Home >> Trees-worth-knowing-1922 >> American Holly I to The Fall Of The_p1

From "Trees Worth Knowing" by Julia Ellen Rogers 1922

American Holly I
American Holly. I. Opaca, Ait. The American Holly Also Yields Its Branches For Christ Mas Greens. In The Remotest Village In The North One May Now Buy At Any Grocery Store A Sprig Of Red-berried Holly To Usher In The Holiday Season. The Tree Is A Small One At Best, ...

American Hornbeam
American Hornbeam. Carpinus Carolinianum, Walt. The American Hornbeam Has Bluish Gray Bark, Very Fine In Texture, From Which The Name "blue Beech," Is Common In Some Localities. "water Beech" Points Out The Tree's Preference For Rich Swamp Land. The Trunk And Limbs Are Strangely Swollen, Sometimes Like A Fluted Column, ...

Black Cottonwood P
Black Cottonwood. P. Trichocarpa, Hook. Farther West, Covering The Mountain Slopes From Alaska To Mexico, And Liking Even Better The Moist, Rich Low Lands, Is The Black Cottonwood, The Giant Of The Genus, Reaching Two Hundred Feet In Height, And Seven To Eight Feet In Trunk Diameter. Tall And Stately, ...

California Laurel
California Laurel. Umbellaria Californica, Nutt. The California Laurel Climbs The Western Slopes Of The Sierra Nevada From The Forests Of Southwestern Oregon To The San Bernardino Range Near Los Angeles. "up North" It Is Called Pepperwood. It Is A Lover Of Wet Soil, So It Keeps Near Streams. With The ...

California White Oak Q
California White Oak. Q. Lobata, Née. The California White Oak Far Exceeds The Eastern White Oak In The Spread Of Its Mighty Arms. The Dome Is Often Two Hundred Feet In Breadth And The Trunk Reaches Ten Feet In Diameter. Such Specimens Are Often Low In Pro Portion, The Trunk ...

Chestnut And Chinquapin
Chestnut And Chinquapin. Castanea Dentata, Borh., And C. Pumila, Mill. Our Native Chestnut And Its Little Brother, The Chin Quapin, Are The American Cousins Of The Sweet Chestnut Of Southern Europe. Japan Has Contributed To American Horticulture A Native Species Which Bears Large But Not Very Sweet Nuts, That Are ...

Eastern Arbor Vitae
Eastern Arbor Vitae. Thuya Occidentalis, Linn. The Eastern Arbor-vitae, Called Also The White Cedar, Is Found In Impenetrable Pure Forest Growth, From Nova Scotia And New Brunswick Northwestward To The Mouth Of The Saskatchewan River, Always In Swampy Regions, Or Along The Rocky Banks Of Streams. In The East It ...

Eastern Mountain Ash
Eastern Mountain Ash. Sorbus Americana, Marsh. The Common Eastern Mountain Ash Reaches Thirty Feet In Height—a Slender, Pyramidal Tree, With Spreading Branches And Delicate Leaves Of From Thirteen To Seventeen Leaflets. The Flat-topped Cluster Of Creamy White Flowers (see Illustration, Page 135) Appears In May And June, Above The Dark ...

Elder Leaved Mountain Ash
Elder Leaved Mountain Ash. S. Sambucifolia, Roem. The Elder-leaved Mountain Ash Overlaps The First Species, And Is Even More Daring As A Climber. It Ranges From Labrador To Alaska, Follows The Rocky Mountains To Colorado, And In The Eastern States Goes No Farther South Than Pennsylvania. Its Leaves Are Graceful ...

European Dogwood C
European Dogwood. C. ?ms. The European Dogwood Or Cornel Is Often Planted In The Eastern States As An Ornamental Tree, But Not For Its Flowers Alone, Though These Tiny, Button-like Clusters Cover The Bare Branches In Earliest Spring. The Showy Fruits Look Like Scarlet Olives Hanging Among The Glossy Foliage ...

European Holly
European Holly. Ilex Aquifolium, Linn. The Holly Of Europe Is Perhaps The Most Popular Orna Mental Tree In The World, Cultivated In Europe Through Centuries, And Now Coming To Be A Favorite Garden Plant Wherever Hardy In The United States. Some Indication Of Its Popularity Abroad Is Found In The ...

European Mountain Ash S
European Mountain Ash. S. Aucuparia, Linn. Most Common In Cultivation Is The European Mountain Ash Called In England The Rowan Tree. This Trim Round Headed Species Is Very Neat And Conventional Compared With Its Wild Cousins, But In The Craggy Highlands Of Scot Land And Wales It Much Resembles Our ...

European Nettle Tree C
European Nettle Tree. C. Australis The European Nettle Tree Is Supposed To Have Been The Famous "lotus" Of Classical Literature. Homer Tells Of The Lotus-eaters Who, When They Tasted The Sweet Fruit, Straight Way Forgot Their Native Land Or Could Not Be Persuaded To Return. This Innocent Tree, Against Which ...

Great Laurel Or Rose
Great Laurel Or Rose Bay. Rhododendron Maximum, Linn. Among The Alleghany Mountains, From Virginia South Ward, The Great Laurel Rises To A Height Of Forty Feet, And Interlaces Its Boughs With Those Of Fraser's Magnolia And The Mountain Hemlock In The Dense Forest Cover. Thickets Of Rhododendron Trees Are Common, ...

Gum The Sour Or
The Sour Or Black, Gum. Nyssa Sylvatica, Marsh. The Sour Or Black Gum Of The South Has A Wide Range, Being Hardy To Southern Ontario And Maine. To The New Englander This Is The "pepperidge "; The Indians Called It " Tupelo "; But The Woodsman, North And South, Calls ...

Hop Hornbeam
Hop Hornbeam. Ostrya Virginiana, Willd. The Hop Hornbeam Has Habits Like The Other Ironwood And An Equal Reputation For The Hardness Of Its Wood. The Tree, However, Wears Scaly, Shaggy Brown Bark, Suggesting In Its Manner Of Scaling Off The Shagbark Hickory. Its Outlets Are Packed Separate In Loose Papery ...

How Trees Spend The_p1
How Trees Spend The Winter. Nine Out Of Every Ten Intelligent People Will See Nothing Of Interest In A Row Of Bare Trees. They Casually State That Buds Are Made In The Early Spring. They Miss Seeing The Strength And Beauty Of Tree Architecture Which The Foliage Conceals In Summertime. ...

How Trees Spend The_p2
The Skin Is The Efficient "third Lung" Of Animals. The Closing Of Its Pores Causes Immediate Suffocation. The Bark Of Trees Carries On The Work Of Respiration In The Absence Of The Leaves. Bark Is Porous, Even Where It Is Thickest. Look At The Twigs Of Half A Dozen Kinds ...

How Trees Spend The_p3
A Tree Takes On In Winter The Temperature Of The Sur Rounding Air. In Cold Weather The Water In Buds And Trunk And Cambium Freezes Solid. Ice Crystals Form In The Intercellular Spaces Where They Have Ample Room, And So They Do No Damage In Their Alternate Freezing And Thawing. ...

Knowltons Ironwood 0
Knowlton's Ironwood. 0. Knowltoni, Cov. Knowlton's Ironwood Is Found Nowhere But In A This': Grove On The Southern Slope Of The Canyon Of The Colorado In Arizona, About Seventy Miles North Of Flagstaff. Here These Trees Are Numerous, Crouching Under Oaks, Their Twisted Branches Ending In Drooping Twigs, Bearing The ...

Oregon Alder A
Oregon Alder. Light, Easily Worked, And Beautifully Satiny When Polished. In Washington And Oregon It Is Largely Used In The Manu Facture Of Furniture. The Indian Dug-outs Are Made Of The Butts Of Large Trees. ...

Oriental Plane P
Oriental Plane. P. Orientalis, Linn. The Oriental Plane Is Almost As Familiar A Tree As Our Native Species, For It Is Planted As A Street Tree In Every City And Village, And Is A Favorite Shade And Lawn Tree Besides. The City Of Washington Has Set The Example And So ...

Pacific Post Oak Q
Pacific Post Oak. Lobed. In Autumn They Sometimes Turn Bright Scarlet. The Wood Is Hard, Strong, Tough, And Close-grained. It Is Employed In The Manufacture Of Wagons And Furniture, And In Ship-building And Cooperage. It Is A Superior Fuel. ...

Rocky Mountain White Pine
Rocky Mountain White Pine. P. Flexilis, James The Rocky Mountain White Pine Inhabits Mountain Slopes From Alberta To Mexico, Including The Sierra Neva Da Range. In Northern New Mexico And Arizona It Occasionally Reaches Eighty Feet In Height, But Ordinarily Does Not Exceed Fifty. Its Rounded Dome, As Broad As ...

Seaside Alder A
Seaside Alder. A. Maritinza, Nutt. The Seaside Alder Shares With The Witch Hazel The Pe Culiar Distinction Of Bearing Its Flowers And Ripening Its Fruit Simultaneously In The Fall Of The Year. The Alder Comes First, Hanging Out Its Golden Catkins In Clusters On The Ends Of The Season's Shoots ...

Shagbark Or Shellbark
Shagbark Or Shellbark. The Shagbark Has Gray Bark That Is Shed In Thin, Tough, Vertical Strips. Attached By The Middle, These Strips Often Spring Outward, At Top And Bottom, Giving The Bole A Most Untidy Look (see Illustrations, Pages, 6, 71), And Threatening The Trousers Of Any Boy Bold Enough ...

Snowdrop Tree M
Snowdrop Tree. M. Diptera, Britt. A Second Species Called The Snowdrop Tree Skirts The Swamps Along The South Atlantic And Gulf Coast And Fol Lows The Mississippi Bayous To Southern Arkansas. It Is Smaller In Stature Than The Silver Bell Tree, But Has Larger Leaves And More Showy Flowers. The ...

Starry Magnolia M
Starry Magnolia. M. Stellata The Starry Magnolia Blooms In March Or April, Covering Itself With Star-shaped White Flowers Made Of Strap-like Petals That Form A Flat Whorl Instead Of A Cup. This Is The Earliest Magnolia And Wonderfully Precocious, Blooming When Scarcely Two Feet High. The Southern States Can Grow ...

Swamp Cottonwood P
Swamp Cottonwood. P. Heterophylla, Linn. The Swamp Cottonwood Of The South Has Leaves Of Varia Ble But Distinctly Poplar Form, Always Large, Broadly Ovate, With Slim Round Petioles. The White Down Of The Un Folding Leaves Often Persists Into Midsummer. On Ac Count Of The Fluttering Leaves The Trees Were ...

The Acacias Or Wattles
The Acacias Or Wattles. Australia Has Contributed To Southern California's Tree Flora A Large Number Of Forms Of The Acacia Tribe, Shrubs And Trees Of Great Variety And Beauty Of Flowers And Ever Green Foliage. They Are Hardy And Perfectly At Home, And Are Planted In Such Profusion As To ...

The Alders
The Alders. Closely Related To The Hornbeams And Birches Is A Genus Of Small Water-loving Trees That Grow Rapidly And Serve Definite, Special Uses In The Old And New World. The Genus Alnus Includes Twenty Species, Nine Of Which Grow In North America; Six Of These Reach The Height Of ...

The American Beech
The American Beech. Fagus Americanus, Sweet. One Of The Most Widely Distributed Trees In Our Country, This Is Also One Of The Most Useful And Most Beautiful In Any Forest. It Is The Sole Representative Of Its Genus In The Western Hemisphere. One Species Is A Valuable Timber Tree In ...

The American Linden Or
The American Linden Or Basswood. Tilia Americana, Linn. The American Linden Or Basswood Is A Stately Spreading Tree Reaching One Hundred And Twenty Feet In Height And A Trunk Diameter Of Four Feet. The Bark Is Brown, Furrowed, And Scaly, The Branches Gray And Smooth, The Twigs Ruddy. The Alternate ...

The Apples Wildrelatives
The Apples - Wild Relatives Of Our Orchard Trees. The Chance Apple Tree Beside The Road, With Fruit Too Gnarly To Eat, Is Common On Roadsides Throughout New England. Occasionally One Of These Trees Bears Edible Fruit, But This Is Not The Rule. Perhaps The Seed Thus Planted Was From ...

The Arbor Vitaes
The Arbor Vitaes. Minute, Scale-like Leaves, Four-ranked, Closely Over Lapping, So As To Conceal The Wiry Twig, Mark The Genus Thuya, Which Is Represented In America By Two Species Of Slender, Pyramidal Evergreen Trees, Whose Intricately Branched Limbs Terminate In A Flat, Open Spray (see Illus Tration, Page 262). "tree ...

The Ashes
The Ashes. Few Large Trees In Our American Woods Have Their Leaves Set Opposite Upon The Twig. Still Fewer Of The Trees With Compound Leaves Show This Arrangement. Con Sult The First Broad-leaved Tree You Meet, And The Chances Are That Its Leaves Are Set Alternately Upon The Twigs. There ...

The Aspen P
The Aspen. P. Tremuloicles, Michx. The Trembling Aspen, Or Quaking Asp, Is The Prettiest Tree Of All The Poplar Tribe. Its Bark Is Gray And Smooth, Often Greenish And Nearly White. An Aspen Copse Is One Of The Loveliest Things In The Spring Landscape. In March The Bare, Angular Limbs ...

The Avocado P
The Avocado. P. Gratissiina, Gaertn. In Florida And Southern California The Avocado Or Alligator Pear Is Being Extensively Cultivated. This Laurel> Grows Wild In The West Indies, Brazil, Peru, And Mexico. Its Berry Attains The Size Of A Large Pear. It Has Been Developed In Several Commercial Varieties, All Having ...

The Bald Cypress
The Bald Cypress. Taxodium, Distichum, Rich. The Bald Cypress Is The One Member Of The Cypress Group That Sheds Its Foliage Each Autumn, Following The Example Of The Tamarack. In The Far South, River Swamps Are Often Covered With A Growth Of These Cypresses Whose Trunks Are Strangely Swollen At ...

The Balsam Fir A
The Balsam Fir - A Fraseri Poir. This Balsam Fir, Much More Luxuriant In Foliage, And Worthier Of Cultivation As An Ornamental Tree, Is Native To The Appalachian Mountains Of Southwestern Virginia, Tennessee And North Carolina. The Purple Cones Are Ornamented By Pale Yellow Cut-toothed Bracts That Turn Back Over ...

The Balsam Fir Abies
The Balsam Fir - Abies Balsamea Mill. The Balsam Fir Is Probably Best Known As The Typical Christmas Tree Of The Northeastern States And The Source Of Canada Balsam, Used In Laboratories And In Medicine. Fresh Leaves Stuff The Balsam Pillows Of Summer Visitors To The North Woods. In The ...

The Balsam Poplar P
The Balsam Poplar. P. Balsamifera, Linn. The Balsam Poplar Is The Balm Of Gilead Of The Early Settlers, The Tacamahac Of The Northern Indians. They Squeezed The Fragrant Wax From The Winter Buds And Used It To Seal Up The Seams In Their Birch-bark Canoes. The Bees Taught The Indian ...

The Basket Oak Q
The Basket Oak. Q. Michauxii, Nutt. The Basket Oak Is So Like The Preceding Species As To Be Listed By Some Botanists As The Southern Form Of Q. Platanoides. They Meet On A Vague Line That Crosses Maryland, Kentucky, And Tennessee. Both Have Large Leaves Silver-lined, With Undulating Border, Of ...

The Bee Tree Or
The Bee Tree Or White Basswood. T. Heterophylla, Vent. The Bee Tree Or White Basswood Of The South Has Nar Rower Leaves Than The Species Just Described, And They Vary In Form And Size; But Always Have Linings Of Fine, Silvery Down, And The Fruits Are Fuzzy. A Wonderful, Dazzling ...

The Big Shellbark
The Big Shellbark. Ii. Lacinata, Sarg. The Big Sheilbark, Like The Little Shellbark, Is A Common Forest Tree In The Middle West And Middle Atlantic States. It Has A Shaggy Trunk, Stout Limbs, Picturesquely Angular, And It Bears Nuts That Are Sweet And Of Delicious Flavor. In Winter The Orange-colored ...

The Big Tree Sequoia
The Big Tree - Sequoia Wellingtonia Seem. The Big Tree Is The Most Gigantic Tree On The Face Of The Earth, The Mightiest Living Creature In Existence. Among The Giant Sugar Pines And Red Firs It Lifts A Wonderfully Reg Ular, Rounded Dome So Far Above The Aspiring Arrow-tips Of ...

The Birches
The Birches Grace And Gentility Of Appearance Are Attributes Of This Most Interesting, Attractive, And Valuable Family Of Trees. Shabby Gentility, One May Insist, Thinking Of The Untidy, Frayed-out Edges That Adorn The Silky Outer Bark Of Almost Every Birch Tree In The Woods. (see Illustration, Page 102.) Not One ...

The Black Acacia
The Black Acacia. Acacia Melanoxylon The Black Acacia, Called At Home In Australian Woods, The "blackwood-tree," For Its Black Heart-wood, Is A Familiar Street And Shade Tree In California. In Narrow Parkings It Is Likely To Surprise The Planter By Outgrowing In A Few Years The Space Allotted To It, ...

The Black Alder
The Black Alder. Alnus Glutinosa, Gaertn. Of The Alders, The Black Alders Of Europe Is The Largest And Most Important Timber Tree. Its Range Includes West Ern Asia And Northern Africa. It Was Introduced Success Fully Into Our Northeastern States In Colonial Times And Has Become Naturalized In Many Localities. ...

The Black Ash F
The Black Ash. F. Nigra, Marsh. The Black Ash Is A Lover Of Marshes, Found From New Foundland To Manitoba, And From Virginia To Arkansas. Its Blue-black Winter Buds, The Sombre Green Of Its Foliage, And The Dark Hues Of Its Bark And Wood Have Justified The Popular Name Of ...

The Black Haw C
The Black Haw. C. Douglasii, Lindl. In The West The Black Haw Is A Round-headed, Native Tree Found From Puget Sound Southward Through California And Eastward To Colorado And New Mexico. It Is A Round-headed Tree Reaching Forty Feet In Height, In Moist Soil. Its Distinguishing Feature Is The Black ...

The Black Haw V
The Black Haw. V. Linn. The Black Haw Has The Characteristic Flowers And Fruit Of Its Genus, But Is Smaller Throughout Than The Other Two, And Its Branches Are Stout. In European Parks And Gar Dens It Is Known As The "stagbush." Its Fruit Turns Dark When Dead Ripe, And ...

The Black Locust
The Black Locust. Robinia Pseudacacia, Linn. The Black Or Yellow Locust Is A Beautiful Tree In Its Youth, With Smooth Dark Rind And Slender Trunk, Holding Up A Loose Roundish Head Of Dark Green Foliage. Each Leaf Is Eight To Fourteen Inches Long, Of Nine To Nineteen Leaflets, Silvery When ...

The Black Maple A
The Black Maple. A. Nigrum, Michx. The Black Maple Is So Like The Sugar Maple That They Are Easily Confused, But Its Stout Branchlets Are Orange-colored, The Leaves Are Smooth And Green On Both Sides, Scantly Toothed, And They Droop As If Their Stems Were Too Weak To Hold Up ...

The Black Mulberry M
The Black Mulberry. M. Nigra, Linn. The Black Mulberry, Probably A Native Of Persia, Has Large, Dark Red, Juicy Fruits, For Which It Is Extensively Cultivated In Europe. In This Country It Is Hardy Only In The Southern And The Pacific Coast States. It Is The Best Fruit Tree Of ...

The Black Oak Group
The Black Oak Group A Large Group Of Our Native Oaks Require Two Seasons To Mature Their Acorns; Have Dark-colored Bark And Foliage, Have Leaves Whose Lobes Are Sharp-angled And Taper To Bristly Points And Tough Acorn Shells Lined With A Silky-hairy Coat. ...

The Black Oak Q
The Black Oak. Q. Velutina, Lam. The Black Oak Of The Vast Region East Of The Rocky Mountains Is The Type Or Pattern Species. Its Leathery, Dark Green Leaves Are Divided By Curving Sinuses Into Squarish Lobes, Each Ending In One Or More Bristly Tips. The Lobes Are Paired, And ...

The Black Poplar P
The Black Poplar. P. Nigra, Linn. The Lombardy Poplar, A Variety Of The Black Poplar Of Europe, Is A Familiar Tree Figure Along Roadsides, And Often Marks Boundary Lines Between Farms. Each Tree Is An Exclamation Point, Its Branches Short And Numerous, Rising Toward The Zenith. The Roundish Leaves That ...

The Black Spruce P
The Black Spruce. P. Mariana, B. S. & P. The Black Spruce Is A Ragged, Unkempt Dingy Tree, With Short Drooping Branches, Downy Twigs, And Stiff Dark Blue Green Foliage, Scarcely Half An Inch Long. Its Cones, Least In Size Of All The Spruce Tribe, Are About One Inch Long ...

The Black Walnut J
The Black Walnut. J. Nigra, Linn. The Black Walnut (see Illustrations, Pages 31, 70) Is The Second Species East Of The Rocky Mountains, And The Tree Chiefly Depended Upon, During The Century Just Closed, By The Makers Of Furniture Of The More Expensive Grades. Black Walnut Wood Is Brown, With ...

The Blue Ash F
The Blue Ash. F. Quadrangulata, Michx. The Blue Ash Has Four-angled Twigs, Often Winged At The Corners With A Thin Plate Of Bark. The Sap Contains A Sub Stance That Gives A Blue Dye When The Inner Bark Is Macerated In Water. The Tree Reaches One Hundred And Twenty Feet ...

The Blue Spruce P
The Blue Spruce. P. Parryana, Sarg. The Blue Spruce Well Known In Eastern Lawns As The "colorado Blue Spruce," Is A Crisp-looking, Handsome Tree, Broadly Pyramidal, With Rigid Branches And Stout Horny Pointed Leaves, Blue-green To Silvery White, Exceeding An Inch In Length. At Home On The Mountains Of Colorado, ...

The Box Elder A
The Box Elder. A. Negundo, Linn. The Box Elder Is The One Maple Whose Leaves Are Always Cleft To The Stem, Making It Compound Of Irregularly Toothed Leaflets. The Clusters Of Flattened Keys, Which Hang All Winter On The Trees, Declare The Kinship Of This Tree To The Maples. Fast-growing, ...

The Bur Oak Q
The Bur Oak. Q. Macrocarpa, Alichx. The Bur Oak (see Illustration, Page 39) Is Called The Mossy Cup On Account Of The Loose, Fringed Scales About The Rim Of The Cup That Holds The Large Acorn—largest In The Whole Oak Family. Often The Nut Is Completely Enclosed By The Cup; ...

The Burning Bush
The Burning Bush. American Gardeners Cherish With Regard That Amounts Almost To Affection Any Shrub Or Tree Which Will Lend Color, Especially Brilliant Color, To The Winter Landscape. Thus The Holly, The Japanese Barberry, Many Of The Haws, The Mountain Ash, And The Rugosa Rose Will Be Found In The ...

The Butternut Whitewalnut
The Butternut - White Walnut Or Oilnut. J. Cinerea, Linn. In Eastern Woods The Butternut Is Known By Its Long, Pointed Nuts, With Deeply And Raggedly Sculptured Shells, In Fuzzy, Clammy, Sticky Husks That Stain The Hands Of Him Who Attempts To Get At The Oily Meat Before The Husks ...

The California Buckeye
The California Buckeye. Ae. Californica, Nutt. The California Buckeye Spreads Wide Branches From A Squat Trunk, And Clothes Its Sturdy Twigs With Unmistak Able Horse-chestnut Leaves And Pyramids Of White Flowers. Sometimes These Are Tinted With Rose, And The Tree Is Very Beautiful. The Brown Nuts Are Irregular In Shape ...

The California Walnut J
The California Walnut. Californians Admire And Plant This Tree For Shade And Orna Ment. Its Greatest Value Is As A Hardy Stock Upon Which The "english" Walnut Is Grafted By Nurserymen, For Plant Ing Orchards Of This Commercial Nut. The Fruit Of The Native Nut Is Excellent, But It Cannot ...

The Canada Plum P
The Canada Plum. P. Nigra., Ait. The Canada Plum (see Illustration, Page 151) Whose Range Dips Down Into The Northern Tier Of States, Is So Near Like The Previous Species As To Be Called By Waugh A Mere Variety. Its Leaves Are Broad And Large, And The Flowers And Fruit ...

The Canoe Birch
The Canoe Birch. Betula Papyrifera, Marsh. The Canoe Birch Or Paper Birch Is The Noblest Member Of The Family. (see Cover Of Book.) Ernest Thompson Seton Calls It "the White Queen Of The Woods—the Source Of Food, Drink, Transport, And Lodging To Those Who Dwell In The Forest—the Most Bountiful ...

The Cherimoya
The Cherimoya. Anona Cizerimolia, Mill. The Cherimoya, Native Of The Highlands Of Central America, Has Long Been Cultivated, And Its Fruit Has Been Classed, With The Pineapple And The Mangosteen, As One Of The Three Finest Fruits In The World. Certainly It Deserves High Rank Among The Fruits Of The ...

The Cherries
The Cherries. Small-fruited Members Of The Genus Prunus, Wild And Cultivated, Are Grouped Under The Popular Name, Cherries, By Common Consent. The Pie Cherry Of New-england Gar Dens Is Prunus Cerasus, Linn. It Often Runs Wild From Gar Dens, Forming Roadside Thickets, With Small Sour Red Fruits, As Nearly Worthless ...

The Cherry Birch B
The Cherry Birch. B. Lenta, Linn. The Cherry Birch Has Dark, Irregularly Checked Bark Like The Wild Cherry, But The Oval, Pointed Leaf, The Catkin Flowers, And The Cone Fruits Of Its Family. Birch Beer Is Made Of Its Aromatic Sap And Wintergreen Oil Is Extracted From The Leaves. Indians ...

The Chestnut Oak Q
The Chestnut Oak. Q. Prinus, Linn. The Chestnut Oak Has Many Nicknames And All Are Descrip Tive. Its Leaves Are Similar In Outline And Size To Those Of The Chestnut. The Margin Is Coarsely Toothed, Not Lobed, Like The Typical Oak Leaf. "tanbark Oak" Refers To The Rich Store Of ...

The Choke Cherry P
The Choke Cherry. P. Virginiana, Linn. The Choke Cherry Is A Miniature Tree No Higher Than A Thrifty Lilac Bush, From The Eastern States To The Mississippi, But Between Nebraska And Northern Texas It Reaches Thirty-five Feet In Height. The Trunk Is Always Short, Often Crooked Or Leaning, And Never ...

The Clammy Locust R
The Clammy Locust. R. Viscose, Vent. The Clammy Locust Has Beautifully Shaded Pink Flowers In Clusters, Each Blossom Accented By The Dark Red, Shiny Calyx, And The Glandular Exudation Of Wax, That Covers All New Growth. A Favorite Ornamental Locust, This Little Tree Has Been Widely Distributed In This And ...

The Cockspur Thorn C
The Cockspur Thorn. C. Crus-galli, Linn. The Cockspur Thorn Is A Small, Handsome Tree, Fifteen To Twenty Feet High, With Stiff Branches In A Broad Round Head. The Thorns On The Sides Of The Twig Are Three To Four Inches Long, Sometimes When Old Becoming Branched, And Reaching A Length ...

The Common Lime T
The Common Lime. T. Vulgaris "tinter Den Linden," The Famous Avenue In Berlin, Is Planted With The Small-leaved Common Lime Of Europe, Be Side Which The American Basswood Is A Coarse-looking Tree. Very Disappointing Docked Trees They Are, Along This Thoroughfare; For City Streets Are Never Places Where A Tree ...

The Cone Bearing Evergreens
The Cone Bearing Evergreens. The Cone-bearers, Or Conifers, Are A Distinct Race That We Commonly Call Evergreens. They Include Pines, Hemlocks, Spruces, Firs, Sequoias, Cypresses, Cedars, And Junipers. Be Sides These, The Tamaracks And The Bald Cypress Must Be Included, Although Their Leaves Are Shed In The Autumn. The Term ...

The Cotton Gum N
The Cotton Gum. N. Aquatica, Marsh. The Cotton Gum Is Draped In Cottony White Down As The New Shoots Start And The Leaves Unfold In Spring. In Mid Summer This Down Persists In The Leaf-linings, Lightening The Dark Green Of The Tree-tops. The Dark Blue Fruits Of This Species Have ...

The Cottonwood P
The Cottonwood. P. Deltoidea, Marsh. The Cottonwood Justifies Its Existence, If Ever A Tree Did. On Our Western Plains, Where The Watercourses Are Slug Gish And Few And Often Run Dry In Midsummer, Few Trees Grow; And The Settler And Traveler Is Grateful For The Cotton , 0 . Woods. ...

The Cuban Pine P
The Cuban Pine. P. Caribaea, Morelet The Cuban Pine Stands Third In The Triumvirate Of Lum Ber Pines Of The South. This Is The "swamp Pine" Or "slash Pine," Found In The Coast Regions From South Caro Lina Throughout Florida, And Along The Gulf Coast To The Pearl River In ...

The Cucumber Tree
The Cucumber Tree. At. Acuminate, Linn. The Cucumber Tree Is The Hardiest Of Our Native Magnolias, Tropical-looking By Reason Of Its Heart-shaped Leaves, Six To Ten Inches Long. Its Chosen Habitat Is Rocky Uplands, Where The Fleshy Roots Can Find Moist Soil. It Ranges From Western New York To Illinois, ...

The Cypresses
The Cypresses. Three Genera Of Pyramidal Conifers, With Light, Graceful Leaf-spray, And Small Woody Cones, Held Erect, Compose The Group Known As Cypresses. All Have Found Places In Horticulture, For Not One Of Them But Has Value For Orna Mental Planting. Some Species Have Considerable Lumber Value. ...

The Digger Pine P
The Digger Pine. P. Sabiniana, Dougl. The Digger Pine Is A Western California Tree Of The Semi Arid Foothill Country. Gray-green, Sparse Foliage On The Gnarled Branches Gives The Tree A Forlorn Starved Look, As It Stands Or Crouches, Singly Or In Scattered Groups, Along The Gravelly Sun-baked Slopes. The ...

The Dogwoods
The Dogwoods Foliage Of Exceptional Beauty Is The Distinguishing Trait Of The Trees In The Cornel Family, From The Standpoint Of The Landscape Gardener And The Lover Of The Woods. Showy Flowers And Fruit Belong To Some Of The Species; Extremely Hard, Close-textured Wood Belongs To All; And This Means ...

The Douglas Spruce
The Douglas Spruce. The Douglas Spruce (pseudotsuga Mucronata, Sudw.), Ranks With The Giant Arbor-vitaes, Firs, And Sequoias In The Forests Of The Pacific Coast. Thousands Of Square Miles Of Pure Forest Of This Species Occur In Oregon, Washington, And British Columbia. Here The Trees Stand Even, Like Wheat In A ...

The Downy Basswood T
The Downy Basswood. T. Pubescens, Ait. The Downy Basswood Has Leaves That Are Green On Both Sides, But Its Young Shoots And Leaf-linings Are Coated With Rusty Hairs. It Is A Miniature Throughout Of The American Basswood, Except That The Blade That Bears The Flower Cluster Is Rounded At Its ...

The Dwarf Juniper
The Dwarf Juniper. Juniperus Communis, Linn. The Dwarf Juniper Departs From The Pyramidal Pattern And Forms A Loose, Open Head Above A Short, Stout Trunk. The Slender Branchlets Are Clothed With Boat-shaped Leaves Which Spread Nearly At Right Angles From The Twigs In Whorls Of Three. Each One Is Pointed ...

The Dwarf Maple A
The Dwarf Maple. A. Glabrum, Torr. The Dwarf Maple Ranges Plentifully From Canada To Arizona And New Mexico. Its Leaves, Typically Three Lobed And Cut-toothed, Vary To A Compound Form Of Three Coarse-toothed Leaflets. The Winged Keys Are Ruddy In Midsummer, Lending An Attractive Dash Of Color To The Woods ...

The Dwarf Sumach R
The Dwarf Sumach. R. Copallina, Linn. The Black Dwarf, Or Mountain Sumach, Is Smaller, With Softer, Closer Velvet Coating Its Twigs And Lining Its Leaves, Than The Burly Staghorn Sumach Wears. It Grows All Over The Eastern Half Of The United States, Even To The Foothills Of The Rocky Mountains, ...

The Eastern Red Cedar
The Eastern Red Cedar. J. Virginiana, Linn. The Eastern Red Cedar Is A Handsome, Narrow Pyramid In Its Youth, Often Becoming Broad And Irregular, Or Round-topped Above A Buttressed, Twisted Trunk, As It Grows Old. The Scale-like Leaves Are Four-ranked, Blue Green When Young, Spreading, And Sometimes Three Fourths Of ...

The Elms
The Elms. Elms Of Sixteen Distinct Species Are Native To Boreal And Temperate Regions Of The Northern Hemisphere, With This Single Exception: Western North America Is Without A Rep Resentative. Europe Has Three Species, Two Of Which Ex Tend Their Range Into Eastern Asia And Northern Africa. Southern And Central ...

The Engelmann Spruce P
The Engelmann Spruce. P. Engelmanni, Engelm. The Engelmann Spruce Is The White Spruce Of The Rocky Mountains And The Cascade Range Of Washington And Oregon, Which Forms Great Forests On High Mountain Slopes From Montana And Idaho To New Mexico And Arizona. Always In Damp Places, This Thin-barked Beautiful Tree ...

The English Elm U
The English Elm. U. Campestris, Linn. The English Elm Is Often Seen In The Eastern States, Planted With The American Elm In Parks And Streets, Where The Two Species Contrast Strikingly. The English Tree Looks Stocky, The American Airily Graceful. One Stands Heavily Upon Its Heels, The Other On Tiptoe. ...

The English Hawthorn
The English Hawthorn. Crataegus Oxyacantha, Linn. Seed, Though In Most Species The Seed Takes Two Years To Germinate. With Few Exceptions, The Flowers Of Our Hawthrons Are Pure White, Perfect, Their Parts In Multiples Of Five—a Family Trait. Each Flower Is A Miniature White Rose. Rounded Corymbs Of These Flowers ...

The English Walnut J
The English Walnut. J. Regia, Linn. Originally At Home In The Forests Of Persia And North Western India, The English Walnut Was Grown For Its Ex Cellent Nuts In The Warm Countries Of Europe And Asia. It Was A Tree Of Great Reputation When Linnaeus Gave It The Specific Name ...

The European Ash F
The European Ash. F. Excelsior, Linn. The European Ash Is The Large Timber Ash From The Atlantic Coast Of Europe To Western Asia. The Earliest Writers Have Ranked Its Wood Next To Oak In Usefulness. It Was Known As "the Husbandman's Tree." Its Uses Were Listed At Interminable Length, For ...

The European Cypress C
The European Cypress. C. Sempervirens, Linn. A Tall, Narrow Pyramid Of Sombre Green, The European Cypress Is Found In Cemeteries In South Europe And Every Where, Planted For Ornament. This Is The Classic Cypress, A Conventional Feature Of Italian Gardens, The Evergreen Most Frequently Mentioned In Classical Literature. Slow Growing ...

The Fall Of The_p1
The Fall Of The Leaves. It Is November, And The Glory Of The Woods Is Departed. Dull Browns And Purples Show Where Oaks Still Hold Their Leaves. Beech Trees In Sheltered Places Are Still Dressed In Pale Yellow. The Elfin Flowers Of The Witch Hazel Shine Like Threads Of Gold ...