Home >> Trees-worth-knowing-1922 >> The Fall Of The_p2 to The Redbud

From "Trees Worth Knowing" by Julia Ellen Rogers 1922

The Fall Of The_p2
Crisp And Dry The Leaves Fall. Among The Crystals And Granules That Remain In Their Empty Chambers There Is Little But Waste That The Tree Can Well Afford To Be Rid Of—sub Stances That Have Clogged The Leaf And Impeded Its Work. We Have Been Mistaken In Attributing The Gay ...

The Figs
The Figs. Smyrna Figs Are Best For Drying. They Form A Delicious, Wholesome Sweet, Which Has High Food Value And Is More Wholesome Than Candy For Children. Tons Of This Dried Fruit Are Imported Each Year From The Countries East Of The Mediterranean Sea. Now California Is Growing Smyrna Figs ...

The Firs
The Firs. Lower Sterile Branches Of The Tree, And Back Of The Growing Shoots, Where Leaves Are Apt To Be Crowded And Immature. The Cones Are Borne Near The Tops Of The Trees, And On These Branches The Leaves Are Often Crowded And Not Two Ranked As They Are Below. ...

The Flowering Dogwood
The Flowering Dogwood. Cornus Floriola, Linn. The Flowering Dogwood (see Illustration, Page 13.4) Is A Little Tree Whose Round, Bushy, Flat-topped Head Is Made Of Short, Horizontal Branches. The Twigs Hold Erect In The Winter A Multitude Of Buds, Large, Squat, Enclosed In Four Scales, Like The Husk Of A ...

The Frijolito
The Frijolito. Sophora Secundiflora, Dc. The Frijolito Or Coral-bean Is A Small, Slender Narrow Headed Tree, With Persistent, Locust-like Leaves, Fragrant Violet-blue Flowers, And Small One-sided Racemes. The Pods Are Silky White, Pencil-like, Constricted Between The Bright Scarlet Seeds. The Tree Grows Wild In Canyons In Southern Texas And New ...

The Fringe Tree
The Fringe Tree. Native To The Middle And Southern Portions Of The United States Is A Slender Little Tree (chionanthus Vir Ginica, Linn.), Whose Sister Species Inhabits Northern And Central China. Both Of Them Cover Their Branches With Delicate, Fragrant White Flowers, In Loose Drooping Panicles, When The Leaves Are ...

The Golden Fig
The Golden Fig. Ficus Aurea, Nutt. The Golden Fig Climbs Up Other Trees And Strangles Its Host With Its Coiling Stems And Aerial Roots. One Far Famed Specimen Has Grown And Spread Like A Banyan Tree, Its Trunk And Head Supported By Secondary Stems That Have Struck Downward From The ...

The Gray Pine P
The Gray Pine. P. Divaricata, Sudw. The Gray Pine Goes Farther North Than Any Other Pine, Following The Mckenzie River To The Arctic Circle. From Nova Scotia To The Athabasca River, It Covers Barren Ground, Reaching Its Greatest Height, Seventy Feet, In Pure Forests North Of Lake Superior. In Michigan ...

The Great Laurel Magnolia
The Great Laurel Magnolia. M. Foetida, Sarg. The Great Laurel Magnolia Is Oftenest Seen In Cultivation As A Small Tree Of Pyramidal Or Conical Habit, With Stiff, Ascending Branches, Bearing A Lustrous Mass Of Leathery Oval Leaves, Five To Eight Inches Long, Lined With Dull Green, Or With Rusty Down, ...

The Green Ash F
The Green Ash. F. Pennsylvanica, Variety Lanceolata, Sarg. The Green Ash Has Narrower, Shorter Leaves Than The Parent Species And Usually More Sharply Saw-toothed Margins. Instead Of Having Pale Linings, The Leaflets Are Bright Green On Both Surfaces. This Is The Ash Tree Of The Almost Treeless Prairies From Dakota ...

The Growth Of A_p1
The Growth Of A Tree. The Great Chestnut Tree On The Hillside Has Cast Its Bur Den Of Ripe Nuts, Flung Down The Empty Burs, And Given Its Yellow Leaves To The Autumn Winds. Now The Owner Has Cut Down Its Twin, Which Was Too Near A Neighbor For The ...

The Growth Of A_p2
What Was Once A Delicate Cell Now Becomes A Hollow Wood Fibre, Thin Walled, But Becoming Thickened As It Gets Older. For A Few Years The Superannuated Cell Is A Part Of The Sap Wood And Is Used As A Tube In The System Through Which The Crude Sap Mounts ...

The Growth Of A_p3
When A Twig Breaks Off, The Bark Heals The Wound And The Grain Becomes Straight Over The Place. Trees Crowded In A Forest Early Divest Themselves Of Their Lower Branches. These Die For Lack Of Sun And Air, And The Trunk Covers Their Stubs With Layers Of Straight-grained Wood. Such ...

The Gum Trees
The Gum Trees Southern People Talk More About "gum Trees" Than People In The North. Two Of Our Three Native Species Of Nyssa Belong Solely To Southern Swamps, And The Third, Which Comes North To Canada, Is Oftener Called By Other Names. All These Trees Are Picturesque, With Twiggy, Con ...

The Hackberries
The Hackberries. Fifty Or Sixty Tropical And Temperate-zone Species Of Hackberries Include Two North American Trees Which Have Considerable Value For Shade And Ornamental Planting. One Hardy Japanese Species Has Been Introduced; Three Exotic Species Are In Cultivation In The South. One Is From South Africa, A Second From The ...

The Hackberry
The Hackberry. Celtic Occidentalis, Linn. The Hackberry Reaches One Hundred And Twenty-five Feet In Height In Moist Soil Along Stream Borders Or In Marshes. It Is Distributed From Nova Scotia To Puget Sound, And South To Florida, Tennessee, Missouri, Texas, And New Mexico. The Beauty Of Its Graceful Crown Is ...

The Hawthorns
The Hawthorns. In The Same Rose Family With Apples, Plums, Cherries, And Service-berries Is Listed The Genus Crataegus, A Shrubby Race Of Trees, Undersized As A Rule, With Stiff, Zigzag Branches Set With Thorns. Over One Hundred Species Have Been Described By Charles Sargent In His "manual Of Trees Of ...

The Hemlock
The Hemlock. Tsuga Canadensis, Carr. The Hemlock Lifts Its Dark Green, Feathery Spray Above The Sturdy Trunk Into A Splendid Broad Pyramid. In All Rocky Uplands From Nova Scotia To Alabama And West To Min Nesota, The Drooping Lower Branches Sweep The Ground, And The Tree Is Often Half Buried ...

The Hemlocks
The Hemlocks. Unlike Any Other Conifer, The Hemlock Mounts Its Ever Green Leaves On Short Petioles, Jointed To Projecting, Horny Brackets On The Twig. At Any Season This Character De Termines The Family Name Of A Group Of Exceptionally Graceful Pyramidal Conifers. The Eastern Hemlocks Have Their Leaves Arranged In ...

The Hollies
The Hollies. The Holly Family, Of Five Genera, Is Distributed From The North To The South Temperate Zones, With Representation In Every Continent. It Includes Trees And Shrubs Of One Hundred And Seventy-five Species, Seventy Of Which Grow In Northern Brazil. The Dried And Powdered Leaves Of Two Holly Trees ...

The Honey Locust
The Honey Locust. Gleditsia Triacanthos, Linn. The Honey Locust Is A Tall Handsome Flat-topped Tree, With Stiff Horizontal, Often Drooping Branches, Ending In Slim Brown Polished Twigs, With Three-branched Thorns, Stout And Very Sharp, Set A Little Distance Above The Leaf Scar Of The Previous Season. Occasionally A Thornless Tree ...

The Hornbeams
The Hornbeams Two Genera Of Little Trees In The Same Family With The Birches Are Frequently Met In The Woods, Often Modestly Hiding Under The Larger Trees. One Is The Solitary Repre Sentative Of Its Genus: The Other Has A Sister Species. The Hornbeams Grow Very Slowly And Their Wood ...

The Horse Bean
The Horse Bean. Parkinsonia Aculeata, Linn. The Horse Bean Or Retama, Native To The Valleys Of The Lower Rio Grande And Colorado River, Is A Small Graceful Pod-bearing Tree Of Drooping Branches Set With Strong Spines, Long Leaf-stems, Branching And Set With Many Pairs Of Tiny Leaflets. The Bright Yellow, ...

The Horse Chestnutsor
The Horse - Chestnuts Or Buckeyes Aesculus Hippocastanum, Linn. At The Head Of This Family Stands A Stately Tree, Native Of The Mountains Of Northern Greece And Asia Minor, Which Was Introduced Into European Parks And Planted There As An Avenue Tree When Landscape Gardening Came Into Vogue. By Way ...

The Incense Cedar
The Incense Cedar. One Tree, So Magnificent In Proportions That It Ranks Among The Giants In Our Western Forests, Stands As The Sole American Representative Of Its Genus. Its Nearest Relatives Are The Arbor-vitaes, Sequoias, And The Bald Cypress Of The South. The Incense Cedar (librocedrus Decurrens, Torr.) Has Its ...

The Jamaica Dogwood
The Jamaica Dogwood. Icthyomethia Piscipula, A. S. Hitch. The Jamaica Dogwood Is A West Indian Tree That Grows Also In Southern Florida And Mexico. It Is One Of The Commonest Tropical Trees On The Florida West Coast From The Shores Of Bay Biscayne To The Southern Keys. The Leaves Are ...

The Japanese Persimmon Kaki
The Japanese Persimmon Kaki. The Native Persimmon Of Japan Has Been Developed Into An Important Horticultural Fruit. China Also Has Species That Are Fruit Trees Of Merit. In The Fruit Stalls Of All American Cities, The Japanese Persimmon Is Found In Its Season, The Smooth, Orange-red Skin, Easily Mistaken For ...

The Junipers
The Junipers. The Sign By Which The Junipers Are Most Easily Distin Guished From Other Evergreens, Is The Juicy Berries Instead Of Cones. In Some Species These Are Red, But They Are Mostly Blue Or Blue-black. Before They Mature It Is Easy To See The Stages By Which The Cone-seales ...

The Kentucky Coffee Tree
The Kentucky Coffee Tree. Gymuocladus Dioicus, K. Koch The Kentucky Coffee Tree Is The One Clumsy, Coarse Mem Ber Of A Family That Abounds In Graceful, Dainty Species. Its Head Is Small And Unsymmetrical, Above A Trunk That Often Rises Free From Limbs For Fifty Feet Above Ground. The Branches ...

The Knob Cone Pine
The Knob Cone Pine. P. Attenuata, Lemm. The Knob-cone Pine Inhabits The Coast Ranges From The San Bernardino Mountains Northward On The Western Slopes Of The Sierra Nevada And Cascade Mountains, Into Southwestern Oregon, Where It Forms Pure Forests Over Large Areas, Its Altitude Limit Being Four Thousand Feet. It ...

The Larches Or Tamaracks
The Larches Or Tamaracks. The Notable Characteristic Of The Small Genus, Larix, Is That The Narrow Leaves Are Shed In The Autumn. Here Is A Tall Pyramidal Conifer Which Is Not Evergreen. It Bears An Annual Crop Of Small Woody Cones, Held Erect On The Branches, And The Leaves Are ...

The Large Leaved Cucumber
The Large Leaved Cucumber Tree. M. Macrophylla, Michx. The Large-leaved Cucumber Tree Exceeds All Other Magno Lias In The Size Of Its Leaves And Flowers. In Fact, No Tree Out Side The Tropics Can Match It, For Its Blades Are Almost A Yard In Length. The Flowers Are Great White ...

The Laurel Family
The Laurel Family. The Laurel Family, A Large Group Of Aromatic Trees And Shrubs Found Chiefly In The Tropics, Includes With Our Sassafras, Laurels, And Bays The Cinnamon And Camphor Trees. ...

The Lawson Cypress C
The Lawson Cypress. C. Lawsoniana, A. Murr. The Lawson Cypress Lifts Its Splendid Spire To A Height Of Two Hundred Feet, On The Coast Mountains Of Oregon And California, Forming A Nearly Continuous Forest Belt Twenty Miles Long, Between Point Gregory And The Mouth Of The Coquille River. Spire-like, With ...

The Life Of The_p1
The Life Of The Trees The Swift Unfolding Of The Leaves In Spring Is Always A Miracle. One Day The Budded Twigs Are Still Wrapped In The Deep Sleep Of Winter. A Trace Of Green Appears About The Edges Of The Bud Scales—they Loosen And Fall, And The Tender Green ...

The Life Of The_p2
In The Lower Half Of The Leaf's Thickness, Between The Pal Isade Cells And The Under Surface, The Tissue Is Spongy. There Is No Crowding Of Cells Here. They Are Irregularly Spherical, And Cohere Loosely, Being Separated By Ample Air Spaces, Which Communicate With The Outside World By The Doorways ...

The Lindens Or Basswoods
The Lindens Or Basswoods This Tropical Family, With About Thirty-five Genera, Has A Single Tree Genus, Tilia, In North America. This Genus Has Eighteen Or Twenty Species, All Told, With Representa Tives In All Temperate Regions Of The Northern Hemisphere, With The Exception Of Central America, Central Asia, And The ...

The Live Oak Q
The Live Oak. Q. Virginiana, Mill. The Live Oak With Its Small Oval Leaves, Without A Cleft In The Plain Margins, Looks Like Anything But An Oak To The Northerner Who Walks Along A Street Planted With This Evergreen In Richmond Or New Orleans. It Is Not Especially Good For ...

The Live Oak Q_2
The Live Oak. Q. Agrifolia, Nee. The Live Oak (q. Nee.) Called Also "encina," Is The Huge-limbed, Holly-leaved Live Oak Of The Lowlands, That Reaches Its Greatest Abundance And Maximum Stature In The Valleys South Of San Francisco Bay. The Giant Oaks Of The University Campus At Berkeley Stretch Out ...

The Loblolly Pine P
The Loblolly Pine. P. Taeda, Linn. The Loblolly Or Old Field Pine Chooses Land Generally Sterile And Otherwise Worthless. It Grows In Swamps Along The Atlantic Coast, From New Jersey Through The Carolinas, And Follows The Gulf From Tampa Bay Into Texas. In Land, It Is Found From The Carolinas ...

The Locusts
The Locusts. Three Representatives Of The Genus Robinia Are Among Our Native Forest Trees. They Are Known In Early Summer By Their Showy, Pea-like Blossoms In Full Clusters, And Their Compound Leaves, That Have The Habit Of Drooping And Folding Shut Their Paired Leaflets When Night Comes On, Or When ...

The Longleaf Pine P
The Longleaf Pine. P. Palustris, Mill. The Longleaf Pine Is Preeminent In Importance In The Lumber Trade And In The Production Of Naval Stores. It Stretches In A Belt About One Hundred And Twenty-five Miles Wide, Somewhat Back From The Coast, All The Way From Virginia To Tampa Bay And ...

The Madrona
The Madrona. The Madroila (arbutus Ilenziesii, Pursh.), Another Mem Ber Of The Heath Family, Is One Of The Superbly Beautiful Trees In The Forests That Stretch From British Columbia Southward Into California. South Of The Bay Of San Francisco And On The Dry Eastern Slopes Of California Mountains It Is ...

The Magnolias Treeswith
The Magnolias - Trees With Showy Flowers And Fruits. Our Of The Ten Genera In The Magnolia Family Are Repre Sented In North America. Of These, Two Are Trees. All Are Known By Their Large, Simple, Alternate Leaves, With Margins Entire; Their Showy, Solitary, Terminal Flowers, Perfect And With All ...

The Maples Deciduoustrees
The Maples - Deciduous Trees With Winged Seeds. A Single Genus, Aver, Includes From Sixty To Seventy Species, Widely Distributed Over The Northern Hemisphere. A Single Species Goes South Of The Equator, To The Mountains Of Java. All Produce Pale Close-grained, Fairly Hard Wood, Valued In Turnery And For The ...

The Melon Papaw
The Melon Papaw. Carica Papaya, Linn. The Melon Papaw Does Not Belong To The Custard-apple Family, But It Grows In Southern Florida And Throughout The West Indies, And Has The Name Of Our Little "wild Banana Tree," So It May As Well Have Mention Here, As It Is The Sole ...

The Mesquite Otherpod
The Mesquite - Other Pod Bearers. Prosopis Juliflora, Dc. The Mesquite Or Honey Pod Is One Of The Wonderful Plants Of The Arid And Semi-arid Regions From Col Orado And Utah To Texas And Southern California. At Best It Is A Tree Sixty Feet High Along The Rivers Of Arizona. ...

The Mississippi Valley Chestnut
The Mississippi Valley Chestnut Oak. Q. Acuminata, Sarg. In The Mississippi Valley The Chestnut Oak Is Q. Acu Minata, Sarg., With A More Slender And More Finely-toothed Leaf That Bears A Very Close Resemblance To That Of The Chestnut. The Foliage Mass Is Brilliant, Yellow-green, Each Leaf With A Pale ...

The Mockernut H
The Mockernut. H. Alba, Britt. The Mockernut Is A Mockery To Him Who Hopes For Nuts Like Those Of Either Shagbark. The Husk Is Often Three Inches Long. Inside Is A Good-sized Nut, Angled Above The Middle, Suggesting The Shagbark. But What A Thick, Ob Stinate Shell, When One Attempts ...

The Monterey Cypress
The Monterey Cypress. Cupressus Macrocarpa, Cord. The Monterey Cypress Is Now Restricted To Certain Ocean Facing Bluffs About Monterey Bay In California. These Trees Are Derelicts Of Their Species. Wind-beaten Into Grotesqueness Of Form, Unmatched In Any Other Tree Near The Sea-level, Their Matted And Gnarled Branches Make A Flat ...

The Monterey Pine P
The Monterey Pine. P. Radiata, D. Don. The Monterey Pine, Like Its Companion, The Torrey Pine, Is Restricted To A Very Narrow Area. They Grow Together On Santa Rosa Island. At Point Pinos, South Of Monterey Bay, This Tree Stands A Hundred Feet In Height, With Trunks Occasionally Five To ...

The Mountain Ashes
The Mountain Ashes. The Handsome Foliage And Showy Flower Clusters Make The Mountain Ashes A Favorite Group Of Little Trees For Border Shrubberies And Other Ornamental Planting. The Foliage Is Almost Fern-like In Delicacy And It Spreads In A Whorl Below The Flower Clusters In Spring And The Scarlet Berry ...

The Mountain Hemlock T
The Mountain Hemlock. T. Ilartensiana, Sarg. The Mountain Hemlock Of The West Is Called By John Muir "the Loveliest Evergreen In America." Sargent En , , Dorses This Judgment With Emphasis. It Grows At High Altitudes, Fringing Upland Meadows, Watered By Glaciers, With Groves Of The Most Exquisite Beauty. The ...

The Mountain Laurel
The Mountain Laurel. The Mountain Laurel (kalnvia Latifolia, Linn.) Grows From Nova Scotia To Lake Erie And Southward Through New England And New York, And Along The Alleghanies To Northern Georgia. Hardier Than The Rhododendrons, Smaller In Blossoms And In Foliage, The Laurel Is In Many Points Its Superior In ...

The Mountain Live Oak
The Mountain Live Oak. Q. Ehrysolepis, Liebm. Sist Until The Bronze-green New Foliage Expands To Replace The Old, And Keep The Tree-tops Evergreen. The Acorns Are Large, And Their Thick, Shallow Saucers Are Covered With Yellow Fuzz. For This Character, The Tree Is Called The Gold-cup Oak. In June, The ...

The Mountain Maple A
The Mountain Maple. A. Spicatum, Lam. The Mountain Maple Is A Dainty Shrub With Ruddy Stems, Large, Three-lobed Leaves, Erect Clusters Of Yellow Flowers And Tiny Brown Keys. It Follows The Mountains From New England To Northern Georgia, And From The Great Lakes Extends To The Saskatchewan. ...

The Mountain Pine P
The Mountain Pine. P. Monticola, D. Don. The Mountain Pine Is Scattered Through Mountain Forests From The Columbia River Basin In British Columbia To Vancouver Island, Along The Western Slopes Of The Rocky Mountains To Northern Montana And Idaho, And South Along The Sierra Nevada And Cascade Ranges In Washing ...

The Mulberries
The Mulberries. The Mulberry Family Includes Fifty-five Genera And Nearly A Thousand Species Of Temperate-zone And Tropical Plants. The Genus Ficus Alone Includes Six Hundred Species. Hemp, Important For Its Fibrous, Inner Bark, And The Hop Vine Are Well Known Herbaceous Members Of The Mulberry Family, Which Stands Botanically Between ...

The Noble Fir A
The Noble Fir. The Oblong Cylindrical Cones, Four To Five Inches Long, Are Velvety, Their Scales Covered By Bracts, Shaped And Notched Like A Scallop Shell, With A Forward-pointing Spine, Exceeding The Bract In Length. Forests Of This Tree At Elevations Of Twenty-five Hundred To Five Thousand Feet Are Found ...

The Norway Maple A
The Norway Maple. A. Platanoides, Linn. The Norway Maple Is Counted The Best Maple We Have For Street Planting. Broad, Thin Leaves, Three-lobed By Wide Sinuses, Cover With A Thick Thatch The Rounded Head Of The Tree. Green On Both Sides, Thin And Smooth, These Leaves Seem To Withstand Remarkably ...

The Norway Spruce
The Norway Spruce. Picea Excelsa, Link. The Norway Spruce (see Illustration, Page 246) Is The Commonest Species In Cultivation. It Is Extensively Planted For Wind-breaks, Hedges And Shelter Belts, Where Its Long Lower Arms Rest On The Ground And The Upper Limbs Shingle Over The Lower Ones, Forming A Thick ...

The Nut Pines
The Nut Pines. The Nut Pines, Four In Number, Supply Indians And Mexicans Of The Southwest With A Store Of Food In The Autumn, For The Seeds Are Large And Rich In Oils And They Have Keeping Qualities That Permit Their Hoarding For Winter. The Four-leaved P. Quadrifolia., Sudw., Scattered ...

The Oaks
The Oaks This Is The Great Family Of The Cup-bearers, Whose Fruit, The Acorn, Is Borne In A Scaly Cup That Never Breaks Into Quarters, As Does The Husk That Holds A Chestnut, Beechnut, Or Hickory Nut. All Oak Trees Bear Acorns As Soon As They Come To Fruiting Age. ...

The Ohio Buckeye
The Ohio Buckeye. Ae. The Ohio Buckeye Has Five Yellow-green Leaflets, Smooth When Full Grown, Pale, Greenish Yellow Flowers, Not At All Conspicuous, And Bitter Nuts In Spiny Husks. The Whole Tree Exhales A Strong, Disagreeable Odor. The Wood Is Peculiarly Adapted To The Making Of Artificial Limbs. The Great ...

The Oregon Ash E
The Oregon Ash. E. Oregona, Nutt. The Oregon Ash Follows The Coast South From Puget Sound To San Francisco Bay, And From The Western Foothills Of The Sierra Nevada To Those Of The Mountains Of Southern California. In Southwestern Oregon The Tree Reaches The Height Of Eighty Feet, With A ...

The Oregon Maple A
The Oregon Maple. A. Macrophyllum, Pursh. The Oregon Maple Grows From Southern Alaska To Lower California, Along The Banks Of Streams. The Great Leaves, Often A Foot In Diameter, On Blades Of Equal Length, Are The Distinguishing Marks Of This Stout-limbed Tree, That Grows In Favorable Soil To A Height ...

The Osage Orange
The Osage Orange. Toxylon Pormferuin, Raff. Related To Figs And Mulberries, But Solitary In The Genus Toxylon, Is The Osage Orange, A Handsome Round-headed Tree, Native Of Eastern North America, Whose Fleshy Roots And Milky, Bitter, Rubbery Sap Reveal Its Family Connec Tions With The Tropical Rubber Plants. (see Illustration, ...

The Palms
The Palms. Palms Are Tropical Plants Related To Lilies On One Hand And Grasses On The Other. One Hundred Genera And About One Thousand Species Compose A Family In Which Tree Forms Rarely Occur. A Few Genera Grow Wild In The Warmest Sections Of This Country, And Exotics Are Familiar ...

The Palo Verde Acacia
The Palo Verde Acacia Cercidium, Torreyanum, Sarg. The Palo Verde Is Another Green-barked Acacia Whose Leaves Are Almost Obsolete. Miniature Honey-locust Leaves An Inch Long Unfold, A Few Here And There In March And April, But They Are Gone Before They Fully Mature, And The Leaf Function Is Carried On ...

The Papaw
The Papaw. Asimina Triloba, Dunal. The Papaw Has The Family Name, Custard-apple, From Its Unusual Fruit, Whose Flesh Is Soft And Yellow, Like Cus Tard. The Shape Suggests That Of A Banana. The Fruits Hang In Clusters And Their Pulp Is Enclosed In Thick Dark Brown Skin, Wrinkled, Sometimes Shapeless, ...

The Papaws
The Papaws. Two Of The Forty-eight Genera Of The Tropical Custard Apple Family Arc Represented By A Solitary Species Each In The Warmer Parts Of The United States. Important Fruit And Ornamental Trees In The Tropics Of The Old World Are Included In This Family, But Their New-world Representa Tives ...

The Pecan H
The Pecan. H. Pecan, Britt. The Pecan Tree Bears The Best Nuts In The Hickory Family. This Species Is Coming To Be A Profitable Orchard Tree In 44ny,spvtions Of The. South. Most Of The Pecan Nuts In The Market Come From Wild Trees In The Mississippi Basin. But Late Years ...

The Persimmon
The Persimmon. Diospysos Virginiana, Linn. The Persimmon Will Never Be Forgotten By The North Erner Who Chances To Visit His Virginia Cousins In The Early Autumn. Strolling Through The Woods He Notes Among Other Unfamiliar Trees A Tall Shaft Covered With Black Bark, Deeply Checked Into Squarish Plates. The Handsome ...

The Persimmons
The Persimmons. The Persimmon Tree Of The Southern Woods Belongs To The Ebony Family, Which Contains Some Important Fruit And Lumber Trees, Chiefly Confined To The Genus Diospyros, Which Has Two Representatives Among The Trees Of North America. Doubtless A Climate Of Longer Summers Would Enable Our Persimmon Trees To ...

The Pignut H
The Pignut. H. Glabra, Britt. Deserves The Better Name, "smooth Hickory," A More Ingratiating Introduction To Strangers. A Graceful, Symmetrical Tree, With Spreading Limbs That End In Deli Cate, Pendulous Branches, And Gray Bark Checked Into A Maze Of Intersecting Furrows, It Is An Ornament To Any Park, Even In ...

The Pin Oak Q
The Pin Oak. Q. Palustris, Linn. The Pin Oak Earns Its Name By The Sharp, Short, Spur Like Twigs That Cluster On The Branches, Crowding Each Other To Death And Then Persisting To Give The Tree A Bristly Appearance. The Tree In Winter Bears Small Resemblance To Other Oaks. The ...

The Pines
The Pines. In A Forest Of Needle-leaved Evergreens It Is Perfectly Easy To Distinguish The Pines By Their Leaves. Look Along The Twigs And You Will Find The Needles Arranged In Bundles, With A Papery, Enclosing Sheath At The Base. Follow Farther Back And These Sheaths Are Missing, But On ...

The Pitch Pine P
The Pitch Pine. P. Rigida, Mill. The Pitch Pine Goes Down To The Very Water's Edge On The Sand-dunes Along The New-england Coast, And Spreads On Worthless Land From New Brunswick To Georgia And West To Ontario And Kentucky. Occasionally In Cultivation The Tree Is Symmetrical, And Grows To Considerable ...

The Pitch Pines
The Pitch Pines. Pitch Pines Have Usually Heavy Coarse-grained, Dark Colored Wood, Rich In Resin—a Nuisance To The Carpenter. The Leaf-bundles Have Persistent Sheaths. The Cone Scales Are Thick And Usually Armed. "hard Pine" Is A Car Penter's Synonym. The Group Includes Some Of The Most Valuable Timber Trees In ...

The Plums
The Plums. The Genus Prunus Belongs To The Rose Family And In Cludes Shrubs And Trees With Stone Fruits. Of The Over One Hundred Species, Thirty Are Native To North Amer Ica; But Ten Of Them Assume Tree Form, And All But One Are Small Trees. Related To Them Are ...

The Pod Bearing Trees
The Pod Bearing Trees. Whenever We See Blossoms Of The Sweet-pea Type On A Tree Or Pods Of The Same Type As The Pea's Swinging From The Twigs, We May Be Sure That We Are Looking At A Member Of The Pod-bearing Family, Leguminosae, To Which Herbaceous And Woody Plants ...

The Poison Sumach R
The Poison Sumach. R. Vernix, Linn. The Poison Sumach Is A Small Tree With Slender Drooping Branches, Smooth, Reddish Brown, Dotted On The Twigs With Orange-colored Breathing Holes, Becoming Orange Brown And Gray As The Bark Thickens. The Trunk Is Often Somewhat Fluted Under A Smooth Gray Rind. This Is ...

The Pond Apples
The Pond Apples. The Pond Apple (anna Glabra, Linn.) Is Our Only Rep Resentative Of Its Genus That Reaches Tree Form And Size, And It Is The Second Of Our Native Custard-apples. It Comes To Us Via The West Indies, And Reaches No Farther North Than The Swamps Of Southern ...

The Poplars Thewater
The Poplars - The Water Loving Trees The Poplars Are Plebeian Trees, But They Have A Place To Fill And They Fill It With Credit. They Are The Hardy, Rude Pioneers That Go Before And Prepare The Way For Nobler Trees. Let A Fire Sweep A Path Through The Forest, ...

The Post Oak Q
The Post Oak. Q. Minor, Sarg. The Post Oak Has Wood That Is Noted For Its Durability When Placed In Contact With The Soil. It Is In Demand For Fence Posts, Railroad Ties, And For Casks And Boat Timbers. "iron Oak" Is A Name That Refers To The Qualities Of ...

The Prairie Crab
The Prairie Crab. Malus Iansis, Britt. The Prairie Crabapple Is The Woolly Twigged, Pink-blos Somed Wild Crab Of The Woods, From Minnesota And Wis Consin To Oklahoma, Texas, And Louisiana. It Has Crossed With The Roadside " Wilding " Trees And Produced A Hybrid Known To Horticulture As The Soulard ...

The Pussy Willow S
The Pussy Willow. S. Discolor, Muehl. The Pussy Willow Is The Familiar Bog Willow, Whose Gray, Silky Catkins Appear In Earliest Spring. A Walk In The Woods In Late February Often Brings Us The Charming Sur Prise Of A Meeting With This Little Tree, Just When Its Gray Pussies Are ...

The Red Ash F
The Red Ash. F. Pennsylvanica, Marsh. The Red Ash Follows The Courses Of Streams And Lake Mar Gins From New Brunswick To The Black Hills And South Into Florida, Alabama, And Nebraska. This Tree Is Much Planted For Shade And Ornament In New England, And In Other Eastern Sections. The ...

The Red Bay
The Red Bay. Persea Borbonia, Streng. Another Laurel Native To Stream And Swamp' Borders, From Virginia To Texas And North To Arkansas, Is The Red Bay, Whose Bark, Thick, Red, And Furrowed Into Scaly Ridges On The Trunk, Becomes Smooth And Green On The Branches. The Evergreen Leaves Are Narrowly ...

The Red Birch B
The Red Birch. B. Nigra, Linn. Red Birch Or River Birch Wears Its Name In Its Chocolate Hued Or Terra-cotta Bark, Whose Scaly Surface Flaunts A Series Of Tattered Fringes To The Very Twig Ends. Tall And Graceful Fountains Of Living Green, These Birches Lean Over Stream Borders From Minnesota ...

The Red Cedar T
The Red Cedar. T. Plicata, D. Don. The Red Cedar Or Canoe Cedar Is The Giant Arbor-vitae Of The Coast Region From British Columbia To Northern California And East Over The Mountain Ranges Into Idaho And Northern Montana. Its Buttressed Trunk Is A Fluted Column One Hundred And Fifty To ...

The Red Fir A
The Red Fir. They Ripen Into Tall Cylindrical Cones, Six To Eight Inches Long And Half As Wide, That Fall To Pieces At Maturity, Discharging Their Broad Thin Scales With The Purple Irides C.:nt Winged Seeds. Pure Forests Of This Splendid Fir Tree Are Found In Southern Oregon Among The ...

The Red Haw C
The Red Haw. C. ?nollis, Scheele The Red Haw Is The Type Of A Large Group, Ample In Size, Fine In Form And Coloring, Of Fruit And Foliage. This Tree Reaches Forty Feet In Height, Its Round Head Rising Above The Tall Trunk, With Stout Branchlets And Stubby, Shiny Thorns. ...

The Red Juniper J
The Red Juniper. J. Barbadensis, Linn. The Red Juniper, Much More Luxuriant Than Its Close Relative Of The North, Is The Handsomest Juniper In Culti Vation. Its Pyramid Is Robbed Of A Rigid Formal Expression By The Drooping Of Its Fern-like Leaf-spray. The Berries Are Silvery White And Abundant. The ...

The Red Maple A
The Red Maple. A. Rubrum, Linn. The Red Maple Is A Lover Of Swamps. It Thrives, However, On Hillsides, If The Soil Be Moist; And Is Planted Widely In Parks And Along Village Streets. In Beauty It Excels All Other Maples. In Early Spring Its Swelling Buds Glow Like Garnets ...

The Red Mulberry
The Red Mulberry. Morns Rubra, Linn. The Red Mulberry Grows To Be A Large Dense, Round-headed Tree, With Thick Fibrous Roots And Milky Sap. Its Alternate Leaves, Three To Five Inches Long, Are Variable In Form, Often Irregularly Lobed, Very Veiny, Usually Rough, Blue-green Above, Pale And Pubescent Beneath, Turning ...

The Red Oak Q
The Red Oak. Q. Rubra, Linn. The Red Oak Grows Rapidly, Like The Pin Oak, And Is A Great Favorite In Parks Overseas, Where It Takes On The Rich Autumnal Red Shades That Give It Its Name At Home. Such Color Is Unknown In Native Woods In England. The Head ...

The Red Pine P
The Red Pine. P. Resinosa, Ait. The Red Pine, Also Called The "norway Pine" For No Par Ticular Reason, Is Something Of An Anomaly. Its Wood Is Soft Like That Of The White Pine With Which It Grows, And Though Resinosa Means "full Of Resin," It Is Not So Rich ...

The Red Spruce P
The Red Spruce. P. Rubens, Sarg. The Red Spruce Forms Considerable Forests From New Foundland To North Carolina, Following The Mountains And Growing Best In Well-drained Upland Soil. This Eastern Spruce Is More Deserving Of Cultivation Than The One Just Described, For Its Leaves, Dark Yellow-green And Shining, Make The ...

The Redbud
The Redbud. Cercis Canadensis, Linn. Stigma, Better Forgotten, For It Does Prejudice The Planter Against A Tree That Should Be On Every Lawn, Preferably Showing Its Rosy Flowers Against A Bank Of Evergreens. Its Natural Range Extends From New Jersey To Florida And West From Ontario To Nebraska And Southward. ...