Home >> Chamber's Encyclopedia, Volume 4 >> Coroner to Crossbill

Chamber's Encyclopedia, Volume 4

Coroner
Coroner (lat. Coronator, Corona, A Crown), A Very Ancient Officer In England, At The Common Law. He Is Mentioned In A Charter Of King Athelstan, 005 A.d; And The Office, Like Much Of The Common Law, Is Acknowledged To Be Of Saxon Origin. The Name Is Derived From The Fact, ...

Corporation
Corpora'tion. This, In England, Is Either Aggregate Or Sole. A C. Aggregate Is A Society Of Persons Authorized By Law To Act As One Person, And To Perpetuate Its Existence By The Admission Of New Members. Without Such Legal Authority, The Acts Of The Soci Ety Would Be Regarded Only ...

Corpus Christi
Corpus Christi, Oxford. This College Was Founded In 1516 By Richard Fox, Bishop Of 'winchester, Under A License From King Henry Viii. The Statutes Were Issued In 1517. The Foundation Consisted Of 20 Fellows And 20 Scholars; Of Whom The Fellows Were To He Elected From The Scholars, While The ...

Correction On The Press
Correction On The Press. This Is One Of The Most Important Of The Many Opera Tions That Every Piece Of Printed Matter Must Undergo Before It Is Put Into The Hands Of The Reading Public; And In Every Considerable Printing Establishment, It Forms A Special Department Executed By One Or ...

Corrugated Iron
Corrugated Iron (lat. Ruga, A Wrinkle). Common Sheet-iron, And What Is Improperly Called "galvanized Iron" (i.e., Sheet-iron Coated With Zinc By Immersion In A Bath Of The Fused Metal), Have Of Late Been Made Available For Ninny Useful Pur Poses, By Virtue Of The Great Additional Strength Imparted To The ...

Corsica
Corsica, An Island In The Mediterranean, Separated From The Island Of Sardinia By The Strait Of Bonifacio On The S. And Situated In Lat. 41° 20' To 43° A., And Long. 8° 30' To 9° 30' East. It Forms The French Department Of Corse, And Has An Area Of :3,350 ...

Corte Real
Corte-real', The Name Of A Noble Portuguese Family. In 1500, Gaspard Corte Real Landed On The Labrador Coast And Stole Some Of The Natives, Whom Lie Took To Portugal And Sold For Slaves. He Went. The Next Year For Another Cargo, But Never Returned. Then His Brother Miguel Set Out ...

Coryphene
Cor'yphene, Corohcena, A Genus Of Fishes Of The Family Scomberidee, To Which The Name Dolphin, Properly Belonging To A Genus Of Eetacea, Has By Some Mistake Been Popularly Transferred. The Coryphenes Are Remarkable For The Beauty And Metallic Bril Liancy Of Their Colors, Which Delight The Spectator As They Are ...

Cosaiogony
Cosaiog'ony (ante), Properly Denotes The Science Of The World's Formation, But. In The Absence Of Knowledge, Is ,applied To Theories On The Subject And Even To Mythical Accounts. The Views Of The Ancients In Regard To It May Be Comprised In Three Classes. 1. That The World Is Eternal Both ...

Cosmogony
Cosmogony (gr. Kosmos, The Universe; Gon, Generation) Is The (so-called) Science Of The Formation Of The Universe. It Is Thus Distinguished From Cosmography, Which Is The Science Of The Parts Of The Universe As We Behold. It (a Science Embodied In The Work Of Humboldt, Entitled Cosmos), And From Cosmology, ...

Cossacks
Cos'sacks (russ. Kusak), A Race Whose Origin Is Hardly Less Disputed Than That Of Their Name. The Latter Has Been Variously Derived From Words Meaning, In Radically Distinct Languages, " An Armed Man, A Saber, A Rover, A Goat, A Promontory, A Coat, A Cassock, And A District In Circassia." ...

Costa Rica
Costa Rica (ante). This Republic Has Been An Independent State Since 1821, From 1824 To 1839 Forming A Part Of The Confederation Of Central America, And Subsequently Separate; Now Governed Under The-constitution Of Dee, 22, 1871. The Legislative Power Ie Vested In A Congress Of One Ehtt-mber,• Chosen In Electoral ...

Costs
Costs, The Technical Name In English Law For The Expenses Incurred In Legal Pro Ceedings. As A General Rule, The C. Of The Successful Party Are Paid By The Loser, But The Rule Is Subject To Important Exceptions. 1. A Party Suing Or Defending Inforrnd Pauperls (to Entitle Him To ...

Costume
Costume (ital. Costume; Fr. Coustume, Costume, From Lat. Consuetudo, Use And Wont) Is Another Form Of The Word Custom, And, In Its Wider Sense, Signifies The External Appearance Which The Life Of A People Presents At A Particular Epoch Of Its History. In Its Narrower And More Usual Sense, C. ...

Cotta
Cotta, The Name Of A Very Old German Publishing-house, Established At Tubingen In 1649, And Still One Of The Most Flourishing In Germany. The Family Came From Italy About The Beginning Of The 15th Century. Its Most Prominent Member Was Joh. Friedr., Freiherr Von C., A Meritorious Theologian Of The ...

Cotton
Cotton, Sir Robert Bruce, A Distinguished English Antiquary, Founder Of The Cottonian Library, Now In The British Museum, Was Born At Denton, Huntingdonshire, 22d Jan., 1570. He Was Educated At Cambridge, And Soon After Taking His Degree Of Mla. In His 16th Year, He Commenced These Archaeological Pursuits Which Have ...

Cotton
Cotton, An Important Vegetable Fiber, Extensively Cultivated In Various Parts Of The Globe Within The 35th Parallels Of Latitude. 1. Botanical And Commercial Classifications.—c. Is The Produce Of All The Species Of The Genus Gossypium, Which Belongs To The Natural Order Malvacece, And Is Thus Allied To Mallow, Hollyhock, Hibiscus, ...

Cotton Famine
Cotton Famine, The History Of Manufacturing Industry Does Not Present A More Strikin; Episode Than That Which Was Connected With The Effects Of The Civil War Iu America On The Cotton Manufactures Of Great Britain In 1861 And Following Years. The Years 1859 And 1860, Unparalleled For The Magnitude Of ...

Cotyledon
Cotyledon (gr. A Cup Or Cup-shaped Hollow), Or Seed-lobe, In Botany, A Principal Part Of The Embryo In Phanerogamous Or Flowering-plants. Cryptogamous Plants Are Acolytedonous (q.v.); Their Seeds Or Spores Have No. Cotyledons. Phanerogamous Plants Are Divided According To Their Seeds Into Monocotyledonous (q.v.), Having Only One C., And Dicolykdonoos ...

Coueacii Or Coracle Cuicrach
Cuicrach, Coueacii Or Coracle (celt. Corteg, Eurach; Lat. Euruea, Earrocium, Cara Bus), The Name Given In The British Islands To A Canoe Or Boat, Made Of A Slender Frame Of Wood, Covered With Skins. Skiffs Of This Sort, As Well As Canoes Hollowed Out Of The Trunks Of Oaks, Were ...

Coughing
Coughing, Considered Physiologically, Consists, 1st, In A Long Inspiration Which Fills The Lungs To A Greater Extent Than Usual; 2d, In The Closure Of The Glottis, Or Narrow Opening In The Organ Of Voice (see Laitvxx), At The Commencement Of The Act Of Expi Ration; And 3d, In The Sudden ...

Count
Count (fr. Comte; Let. Comes). In Classical Writers, Down To The End Of The 4th C., The Meanings Attached To The Word Comes Were Comparatively Few And Simple. At First It Signified Merely An Attendant, And Differed From Socius Chiefly In Expressing A Less Intimate And Equal Relation To The ...

Counterfort
Counterfort, In Fortification, Is A Mass Of Stone Or Brickwork Added To The Revet Ment Of A Rampart, In Such A Way As To Form A Buttress For Resisting The Pressure Of The Mass Of Earth. Counterforts Occur At Intervals Of About 20 Ft., And Assist In Preventing The Earth ...

Counterpoint
Counterpoint, In Music, Means The Setting Of A Harmony Of One Or More Parts To A Melody. In The Early Age Of The Science, Notation Was Represented By Mere Points On Th-. Lines. The Setting Of Parts To A Melody Already Represented By A Row Of Dots Or Points Was ...

County Courts
County Courts. The Present C. C. Were Established In 1846, Principally For The Purpose Of Affording A Cheap And Speedy Mode Of Recovering Small Debts. The Old C. C., Kept By The Sheriffs, Were In Most Cases Limited To The Recovery Of Sums Not Exceeding 40s., And The Expense And ...

Couples
Couples, The Name Given In Statics To Pairs Of Equal Parallel Forces In Opposite Directions, And At Different Points Of A Body. It Is Shown In The Art. L'arallel Forces (q.v.), That When Two Parallel Forces Act In Opposite Directions On A Body, They May Be Replaced By One Equal ...

Couriers
Couriers. There Are Two Distinct Classes Of Couriers. The First To Be Noticed Are Employed By Government To Carry, Securely And Expeditiously, Important Dispatches To And From Ambassadors At Foreign Courts. Active And Accustomed To Travel, Speaking Several Languages, And With A Sufficient Idea Of Their Own Consequence, They Will ...

Coursing
Coursing, A Method Of Hunting Hares By Greyhounds, In Which The Dogs Follow The Game By Sight, Instead Of By Scent. C. Is Of Very Ancient Date, Having Been Practiced By The Greeks. Within The Last 20 Years, However, Its Popularity As A Sport Has Greatly Increased, And The Breed ...

Court Fool
Court-fool, From Very Ancient Times There Existed A Class Of Persons Whose Busi Ness It Was To While Away The Time Of The Noble And Wealthy, Particularly At Table, By All Manner Of Jests And Witty Sayings. Alexander The Great, Dionysius Of Syracuse, Augustus And His Successors, Maintained Such Jesters. ...

Court Of Claims
Claims, Court Of, In The United States, Created By Act Of Congress, Feb. 24, 1855, And Consisted Of Three Judges Appointed By The President And Senate, To Hold Office Dur Ing Good Behavior, And To Have Jurisdiction To Hear And Determine All Claims Founded Upon Any Act Of Congress, Or ...

Court Of Session
Court Of Session, The Highest Civil Tribunal In Scotland, Was Instituted In The Reign Of King James V., By Statute Dating 17th May, 1532. The Object Of Its Institution Was To Discharge The Judicial Functions Which Originally Belonged To The King And His Council, And Which, Since 1425, Had In ...

Courtesy Titles
Courtesy Titles. Titles Of Honor (q.v.) Are Imparted By The Sovereign Or Other Competent Authority. Independently Of These, There Are C. T. Assumed By Or Given To Indi Viduals, And Which Have No Validity In Law. The Term Courtesy Title Is Best Known In Con Nection With The Titles Given ...

Covenant
Covenant (lat. Convenire, To Come Together), A Contract Or Agreement; A Term Much Used By Theologians, And In Its Ordinary Signification, As Well As In Its Theological,use, Nearly If Not Always Exactly Equivalent To The Hebrew Milk Of The Old Testament And The Greek Diathike Of The New. Applied To ...

Coventry
Coventry (convent Town), A City, Parliamentary And Municipal Borough, And Manufacturing Town In The North Of 'warwickshire, On The Sherbourne, An Affluent Of The Avon, 186- M. E.s.e. Of Birmingham. It Stands On A Gentle Eminence In A Valley, With It Ridge Of Hill On The S. And Contains Ninny ...

Coverdale
Cov'erdale, .11iles, An Eminent English Divine, Was B. In Yorkshire In 1487. He Was Educated At Cambridge By The Augustin Friars, And Becoming An Augustin Monk, Was Ordained At Norwich. Lie Appears, However, To Have Soon Changed His Religious Opinions And To Have Devoted Himself Earnestly To The Work Of ...

Coviiber
Coviiber, A Genus Of Serpents Which, As Defined By Linnmus, Included An Extremely Miscellaneous Assemblage Of Species, Venomous And Not Venomous, Agreeing Only In The Character Of Having A Double Row Of Plates On The Under Side Of The Tail. The Venomous Species Are Now Excluded, Not Only From The ...

Cow Tree
Cow Tree, A Name Given To A Number Of Species Of Tree Of Different Natural Orders, The Bland Milky Juice Of Which Is Used Instead Of Milk. They Are All Natives Of Tropical Countries, And Mostly Belong To Natural Orders In Which Acridity Is The General Charac Teristic Of The ...

Cowper
Cowper, Wri.mnu, An English Poet, Was B. On The 26th Nov., 1731, In The Parson Age House Of Great Berkliamstead. Father, Who Was Chaplain To George Ii., Married Ann, Daughter Of Roger Donne, Esq., Of Ludham Ball, In Norfolk. This Lady Expired In Childbirth, In 1737, Leaving Two Sons, William, ...

Cowry
Cowry, Corcea, A Genus Of Gasteropodous Mollusks Of The Order Pectinibranchiata —the Type Of A Family, Cyprceidee, To All Of Which The Name C. Is Often Extended—having The Margin Of The Mantle Prolonged Into A Siphon, By Which Water Is Conveyed Into The Gill Chamber, And A Spiral Convoluted Shell, ...

Crab
Crab, The Popular Name Of All The Crustaceans Of The Order Decapoda (the Highest Order Of Crustaceans, Characterized By Great Concentration Of The Nervous System And Corresponding General Concentration, By Five Pair Of Thoracic Limbs, And By Having The Gills Inclosed In A Special Cavity On Each Side Of The ...

Cracow
Cracow (pol. Krakoz), Formerly The Capital Of A Small Polish Republic, And Anciently The Capital Of The Kingdom Of Poland, Is Now An Austrian City, Situated On The Left Bank Of The Vistula, Where It Becomes A Navigable River, In A Beautiful Plain Surrounded By An Amphitheater Of Gentle Hills. ...

Craig
Craig, Jorrn, An Eminent Preacher Of The Reformation, Was B. In Scotland About 1512. Having Spent Some Time As A Tutor In England, He Returned To Scotland And Entered The Dominican Order, Of Which He Had Not Long Been A Member When He Fell Under The Sus Picion Of Heresy, ...

Crail
Crail, A Royal And Parliamentary Borough And Seaport In The "east Neuk" Of Fife Shire, 2 M. S.w. Of Fifeness, And 10 M. S.e. Of St. Andrews. Pop. '71, 1126. Along With St. Andrews, East And West Anstruther, Cupar, Kilrenny, And Pittenweeni, It Returns One Member To Parlianient. C. Was ...

Crake
Crake, Crex, A Genus Of Birds Of The Rail Family (rallida), Differing From The True Rails In Having The Bill Shorter Than The Head And Comparatively Thick. The Wings Are Also Armed With A Small Concealed Spine. The Name Is Derived From The Harsh Call-note Of The Male. The Best ...

Cranach
Cranach, Lucas, A Celebrated German Painter, Was B. In The Bishopric Of Bamberg In The Year 1472. Little Is Known Of His Early Life, Except That He Was Instructed In Art By His Father—that He Visited Palestine In 1493, With The Elector Frederick The Wise Of Saxony, Who Made Him ...

Cranberry
Cranberry, Arycoccus, A Genus Of Small Evergreen Shrubs Of The Natural Order Vaccine, Distinguished From The Genus Vaccinium (see Whortleberry) By The Wheel Shaped Corolla, With Segments Rolled Back And The Filaments Leaning To The Pistil. The Species Are Few, Natives Of The Colder Regions Of The Northern Hemisphere. The ...

Crane
Crane, Grus, A Genus Of Birds Of The Order Grallatores, The Type Of The Family Gruidw. This Family Differs From Herons, Bitterns, Storks, Etc., In Having The Hind-toe Placed Higher On The Leg Than The Front Ones. It Consists Also Of Birds Less Addicted To Marshy Places, And Which Feed ...

Crannoges
Crannoges, The Name Given In Ireland And In Scotland To The Fortified Islands In Lakes Which Were In Common Use As Dwelling-places And Places Of Refuge Among The Celtic Inhabitants. The Etymology Of The Word Is Uncertain, But It Is Believed To Refer To The Timber Which Was Employed Either ...

Crassus
Crassus, :lances Licinius, The Triumvir, Was Born Sometime Before 115 U.c. His Father And Brother Suffered Death From The Party Of Marius, 81 Tic., And He Himself— Though Young—was Subjected To A Jealous And Dangerous Surveillance. In 85 B.c., To Escape From This, He Went To Spain. Ile Afterwards Joined ...

Creationism
Creationism, A Term Recently Applied To That Theory Of The Origin Of Man Which Is Thought To Be Opposed To Evolutionism (see Anthropology, Evolution). C., How Ever, Has For Centuries Been Used To Indicate A Theory As To The Origin Of The Soul. The Question In Theology Has Been, Whether ...

Credit
Credit, In Political Economy, Is One Of Many Terms Used In That Science, Of Which It Is Said That We Yet Possess No Scientific Definition. This Is The Less To Be Regretted, As The Practical Meaning Of The Word Is Thoroughly Known, So As To Enable Every One To Understand ...

Creeds And Confessions
Creeds And Confessions Are The Names Given To The Authorized Expressions Of The Doctrine Of The Church At Large, Or Of The Several Main Sections Into Which It Is Divided. Such Statements Of Doctrine Sprang Up Naturally In The Course Of The Church's Progress. As The Simple Truths Taught. By ...

Creeks
Creeks, A Nation Of Indians Originally Living In Alabama And Georgia. During The Revolutionary War They Adhered To The English, And Were Hostile To The Colonists Even After Peace. But In 1790, They Made A Treaty With The Federal Government, In Which Nearly A Dozen Other Nations Or Tribes Joined. ...

Creeper
Creeper, Certhia, A Genus Of Birds, The Type Of The Family Certhicace; Having A Longish, Slender, Arched, And Pointed Bill; A Long, Narrow, Sharp-pointed Tongue, Jagged Near Its Tip; The Tail Rather Long, And The Tips Of The Tail-feathers Firm And Pointed. Extending Beyond The Webs, The Feet Are Rather ...

Cremation
Cremation, The Burning Of Human Corpses, Appears To Have Been A General Prac Tice In Early Times, With Three Exceptions: Egypt, Where They Were Embalmed; Judea, Where They Were Laid Away In Sepulchers; And China, Where They Were Buried In The Earth. In Greece, Suicides, Children Not Yet Having Teeth, ...

Cress
Cress, A Name Given To Many Plants, Of Which The Foliage Has A Pungent, Mustard Like Taste, And Is Used As A Salad. It Is Sometimes More Strictly Confined To The Genus Lepidium, A Genus Of The Natural Order Cruciferm, Having Small White Flowers, And Oblong Or Rounded Laterally Compressed ...

Crest
Crest (lat. Crista, A Tuft, From Cresco, To Grow Up). Though Popularly Regarded As The Most Important Feature In Heraldic Emblems, The C., In The Eyes Of Heralds, Is An External Adjunct To The Shield, Without Which The Bearing Is Complete, And Which May Consequently Be Altered Without Materially Affecting ...

Cretaceous System
Cretaceous System (ante), In North America, Extends Along The Atlantic, S. Of New York—where, Though Mostly Hidden By The Tertiary Formation, It Is Visible In New Jersey And Further S.—around The N. And W. Shores Of The Mexican Gulf, Up The Mississippi Valley To The Mouth Of The Ohio, And, ...

Cretinism
Cretinism, From Cretin (french), An Idiot Of The Alps, And This Again Probably From Chretien, A Christian, One Who, From His State Of Fatuity, Could Not Sin, And Was Viewed With Some Degree Of Religious Respect. The Name Of C. Is Now Applied In A More General Sense To Idiocy, ...

Cribbage
Cribbage Is A Game With Cards, Played By Two, Three, Or Four Persons, The Whole Pack Being Used. When Three Are Engaged, Each Plays For Himself; When Four, They Take Sides. The Value Of The Cards Is The Same As At Whist; But There Are No Trumps. The Number Of ...

Cricket
Cricket (gryllus; Acheta Of Some Naturalists), A Genus Of Orthopterous Insects, Of The Section Sanatoria (in Which The Hinder Legs Are Long, Very Strong, And Formed For Leaping), Allied To Locusts And Grasshoppers, And The Type Of A Family Gryllidm (or Achetida). The Wings Are Folded Horizontally, And Form, When ...

Cricket
Cricket (of Doubtful Derivation), A Well-known Game, Is Of Very Ancient Date. The Author Of The Cricket Of The Best Manuals On The Subject—believes It To Be Identical With "club-ball;" A Game Played In The 14th C.; It Went Originally By The Name Of " Handyn And Handoute." C. Is ...

Cricklade
Cricklade, An Agricultural T. And Parliamentary Borough, In The N. Of Wiltshire, 7 M. S.e. Of Cirencester, On The Right Bank Of The Isis. The Town Of C. Consists Of One Long Street. The Government Is In A High-bailiff, Appointed By The Town. It Has A Con Siderable Retail Trade; ...

Crillon
Crillon, Louts Ne Bf:rton Des Balres, Surnamed " I.e Brave," Was B. At }furs, In Provence, In 15•1. Under Francis Of Lorraine, Duke Of Guise, Then The Model Of Military Chivalry, He Was Trained For War, And, At The Age Of 16. Was Accounted An Accomplished Stildler. In 1538, He.gave ...

Crime
Crime, In Its Legal, As Opposed To Its Moral Or Ethical Sense, Is An Act Done In Violation Of Those Duties For The Breach Of Which The Law Has Provided That The Offender, In Addition To Repairing, If It Be Possible, The Injury Done To The Individ Ual, Shall Make ...

Crimea
Crimea (anciently, The Taurie Chersonese). A Peninsula In The S. Of Russia, Form Ing The Greater Part Of The Government Of Taurida, In Let. 44° 44' To 46° 5' N., Long. 32° 30' To 36' 35' East. It Is United To The Mainland Only By The Very Narrow Isthmus Of ...

Crimean War
Crime'an War, Begun In 1953. As The French And Russian Governments Had Taken Sides In The Contention Between The Latin (or Roman) And Greek (or Russian) Churches For Exclusive Possession Of The Holy Sepulcher And Other Sacred Places, The Czar Sent Prince 3lenschikoff To Constantinople Feb. 28, 1853, As Envoy ...

Crinoline
Crinoline (fr., From Lat. Crinis, Hair) Was The Name Originally Given By The French Modistes To A Fabric Made Of Horse Hair, Capable Of Great Stiffness, And Employed To Dis Tend Women's Attire; It Is Now Applied In A General Way To Those Structures Of Steel Wire Or Hoops, By ...

Crinomee
Crinomee (gr. Lily-like), An Order Or Family Of Radiate Animals Of The Class (rhino. Dernutta (q.v.), Of Which The Recent Species Are Few, But The Fossil Species So Very Numer Ous As To Constitute Great Tracts Of The Dry Land As It Now Appears. The C. Have A Cen Tral ...

Crisis
Crisis (gr. A Judgment, From Krino, I Judge), A Name Used By The Ancient Physicians To Denote The Rapid Or Sudden Determination Of An Acute Disease In The Direction Of Con Valescence Or Of Death. It Was Opposed In Signification To Lysis (luo, I Relax). Which Denoted The Gradual Subsidence ...

Critcitere
Critcitere (lat. Cross-carrying), An Important Natural Order Of Exogenous Plants, Including About 1600 Known Species, And Corresponding With The Class Tetradynamia Of The Linnwan System. See Botany. The .flowers Have A Calyx Of Four Sepals, Which Fall Off After Flowering; And A Corolla Of Four Petals, Which Are Placed In ...

Criticism
Criticism, The Act And Art Of Passing Judgment According To A Right Standard Upon Any Literary, Artistic, Philosophical, Or Mechanical Work, And Pointing Out Its Merits And Defects. It Is The Outgrowth And Aid Of Literature And Art; Valuable In Proportion As It Is Intelligent, Impartial, Thorough, And Free From ...

Croatia
Croatia, A Kingdom Forming Part Of The Austrian Empire. Along With Slavonia It Forms One Of The Administrative Divisions Of The Kingdom Of Hungarv. And Their Joint Pop. Is (1869) 1,164,806; Their Area, 8,757 Sq. Miles. C. Lies To The N.e. Of Adriatic, And Borders On One Side With Turkey. ...

Crocodile
Crocodile, Crocodiles, A Genus Of Saurian Reptiles, The Type Of The Family Crocodil Idce; Which Some Naturalists Have Erected Into A Distinct Order Of Reptiles (loricata), On Account Of The Square Bony Plates With Which Their Bodies Are Covered, Instead Of The Scales Of The Other Saurians—the Greater Solidity Of ...

Cromlech
Cromlech.. It Has Been Common Among British Archaeologists, Until Lately, To Apply This Name To A Rude Structure Of Two Or More Unheesn Stones, Placed Erect In The Earth, And Supporting A Larger Stone, Also Zenhewn. According To Its Etymology, However, Cromlech (celt. Crow, Circle, And Leek, A Stone) Is ...

Crompton
Crompton, S
Cronstadt
Cronstadt, A Strongly Fortified Seaport, About 20 M. W. Of St. Petersburg, On A Narrow Calcareous Island Of About 5 M. In Length, At The Narrowest Part Of The Gulf Of Finland, And Over Against The Mouth Of The Neva. Lat. (of Cathedral) 59' 59' 46' N., Long. 29° 46' ...

Croquet
Croquet, An Open-air Game, In Which Two Or More Players Endeavor To Drive Wooden Balls, By Means Of Long-handled Mallets, Through A Series Of Arches Set In The Ground According To Some Pattern. The Player Who First Makes The Complete Circle Of The Hoops Or Arches Wins The Match; But ...

Cross
Cross. The C. Was A Conunon Instrument Of Capital Punishment Among The Ancients; And The Death Of The C. Was Esteemed So Dishonorable That Only Slaves And Malefactors Of The Lowest Class Were Subjected To It By The Romans. It Was Customary To Proclaim The Name And Offense Of The ...

Crossbill
Crossbill, Lazio, A Genus Of Birds Of The Family/ii/wit/we, Much Resembling Bull. Finches, Linnets, Etc., Except In The Bill, Which Is Altogether Singular; The Two Mandibles —which Are Rather Long, Thick At The Base, And Much Curved—crossing Each Other At The Points, When The Bill Is Closed. In Different Individuals, ...