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Collier's New Encyclopedia, Volume 9

Spore
Spore, The Reproductive Body In A Cryptogam, Which Differs From A Seed In Being Composed Simply Of Cells And Not Containing An Embryo. Called Also Spor Ules. Applied Also To The Reproductive Bodies Produced Either Singly Or At The Tips Of The Fruit-bearing Threads In Fungi. Plants Reproduce Themselves In ...

Spring
Spring, An Elastic Substance Of Any Kind, Having The Power Of Recovering, By Its Elasticity, Its Natural State, After Being Bent Or Otherwise Forced, Inter Posed Between Two Objects In Order To Impart Or Check Motion Or Permit Them To Yield Relatively To Each Other. Also, One Of The Four ...

Standard Oil Company
Standard Oil Company, A Union Of Business Interests That Have Held Since 1880 A Predominant Position In The Petroleum Industry. Its Rise Goes Back To 1867, When The Firm Of Rockefeller, Andrews And Flagler Was Formed. The Next Important Step In Its Progress Oc Curred Three Years Later, When The ...

Standard Time
Standard Time, A System Of Time Reckoning, Chiefly For The Convenience Of Railroads In The United States, Estab Lished By Mutual Agreement In 1883 On Principles First Suggested By Charles F. Dowd, Of Saratoga Springs, N. Y. The United States, Beginning At Its Ex Treme E. Limit And Extending To ...

Stanhope
Stanhope, The Name Of A Noble English Family. James, 1st Earl Stanhope; Born In Paris, France, In 1673. He Entered The Army, Served As Brigadier-general Under The Earl Of Peterborough At The Capture Of Barce Lona In 1705, Was Appointed Com Mander-in-chief Of The British Forces In Spain, And In ...

Star
Star, One Of The Self-luminous Bodies Which Surrounds Our Solar System On All Sides. They Are Distinguished From The Planets By Their Flickering Light, By The Comparative Const,ncy Of Their Relative Positions In Space, And By Their Inappre Ciable Diameter Even When Viewed By The Most Powerful Optical Instruments. The ...

Star Chamber
Star Chamber, A British Tribunal Which Met In The Old Council Chamber Of The Palace Of Westminster, And Is Said To Have Received Its Name From The Roof Of That Apartment Being Decorated With Gilt Stars, Or Because In It "starres" Or Jewish Bonds Had Been Kept. It Is Sup ...

State Banks
State Banks, Financial Institutions Doing A Banking Business Under The Su Pervision Of The State, Which Guarantees Its Integrity To A Greater Or Lesser Ex Tent, According To The Individual State's Laws, The Relation Between The Bank And The State Being Similar To The Relation Between A National Bank And ...

Steam
Steam, In Physics, Water In Its Gas Eous Form. It Is A Colorless, Invisible Gas, Quite Distinct From The Visible Cloud Which Issues From A Kettle, Etc., Which Is Composed Of Minute Drops Of Water Produced By The Condensation Of The Steam As It Issues Into The Colder Air. Under ...

Steam Hammer
Steam Hammer, A Hammer Worked By Means Of Steam. The Idea Of A Steam Hammer Seems To Have Occurred First To James Watt, Who Patented It In 1784. William Deverell Also Took Out A Patent For A Steam Hammer In 1806; But It Does Not Appear That In Either Case ...

Steam Turbine
Steam Turbine. The Principles Underlying The Steam Turbine Are Very Simple, Much More So, Indeed, Than Those Of The Reciprocating Engine. It Is, Therefore, Not Surprising That Turbines Of A Single And Crude Type Were In Vented Very Early In History. The First Steam Turbine Is Believed To Have Been ...

Steamboat
Steamboat, A Boat Or Vessel Pro Pelled By Steam Acting Either On Paddles By Denis Papin, Who Navigated It Safely Down The Fulda As Long Ago As 1707. Unfortunately This Pioneer Craft Was De Stroyed By Jealous Sailors, And Even The Very Memory Of It Was Lost For Three Quarters ...

Steel
Steel. Steel May In A General Way Be Defined As A Variety Or Condition Of Iron Capable Of Being Melted And Cast, Hammered And Welded, And Of Being Tem Pered, Or Hardened And Softened. It Is •. Thus In Its Properties Intermediate Be Tween Malleable And Cast Iron, And In ...

Steel Skeleton Construction
Steel Skeleton Construction, A Form Of Building Construction By Which The Loads And Stresses Are Transmitted To The Foundation By A Framework Of Metal Or Re-enforced Concrete, With Girders At Each Story Supporting The Walls Enclosed. It Represents One Of The Greatest Devel Opments In Building From The Earliest Days ...

Stem
Stem, In Botany, The Ascending Axis Of A Plant. It Seeks The Light, Strives To Expose Itself To The Air, And Expands It Self To The Utmost Extent Of Its Nature To The Solar Rays. With Regard To Direction, It May Be Erect, Pendulous, Nodding, De Cumbent, Flexuose, Creeping, Or ...

Stock Exchange
Stock Exchange, A Place And In Stitution Where Securities Are Sold And Purchased. In Its Origin It Was, As The Name Implies, Merely A Place To Buy And Sell, And As Such Has Had Its Place In The History Of Every Town And City Since Men Began To Barter With ...

Stockholm
Stockholm, The Capital Of The King Dom Of Sweden; On Several Islands And The Adjacent Mainland, Between A Bay Of The Baltic And Lake Maier; In A Sit Uation That Is Accounted One Of The Most Picturesque In Europe. The Nucleus Of Stockholm Is An Island In Mid-channel Called "the ...

Stoics
Stoics, The Name Applied To A Body Of Philosophers Who Flourished First In Greece About The 4th Century, But Whose Influence Finally Spread Over The Whole Classical World. Their Place In The His Tory Of Philosophy Is Immediately After Plato And Aristotle. They Divided Philos Ophy Into Three Parts—logic, Physics, ...

Stomach
Stomach, In Comparative Anatomy, A Membranous Sac, Formed By A Dilatation Of The Alimentary Canal, In Which Food Is Received And Subjected To The Processes Of Digestion Among The Vertebrata. The Human Stomach Is An Elongated, Curved Pouch, From 10 To 12 Inches Long, And 4 Or 5 Inches In ...

Stonehenge
Stonehenge, A Very Remarkable Structure Composed Of Large Artificially Raised Monoliths, Situated On Salisbury Plain, In Wiltshire, England. The An Cient Britons Called It Main Ambers, Or "sacred Stones." The Spot Is Surrounded By A Ditch 50 Feet Wide; The Outer Circle Consisted Of 60 Stones, 30 Perpendicular, 20 Feet ...

Storage Battery
Storage Battery, A Battery Which When Charged Can Be Used For Some Time As A Source Of Electric Cur Rent. Gautberot, In 1801, First Conceived The Idea Of Such A Battery. Faraday, In His "researches," Mentions Its Prac Ticality. However, It Was Left To Gaston Plante, In 1860, To Construct ...

Storm
Storm, A Violent Commotion Or Dis Turbance Of The Atmosphere, Producing Or Attended By Wind, Rain, Snow, Hail, Or Thunder And Lightning ; A Tempest; Often Applied To A Heavy Fall Of Rain, Snow, Etc., Without A High Wind. There Is, Perhaps, No Question In Science In Which There Was ...

Strabo
Strabo, A Noted Geographer; Born In Amasea, Pontus, About 63 B. C. On The Mother's Side He Was Descended From A Greek Family Closely Connected With The Kings Of Pontus. Of His Father We Know Nothing. The Dates Of His Visits To Most Of The Countries Through Which He Traveled ...

Strangulation
Strangulation, An Act Of Violence In Which Constriction Is Applied Directly To The Neck, Either Around It Or In The Forepart, In Such A Way As To Destroy Life. This Definition Obviously Includes Hang Ing Which Differs From Other Forms Of Strangulation, Only In That The Body Is Suspended. The ...

Strassburg
Strassburg, A Town And Fortress Of France, In Alsace; Capital Of The Terri Tory Of Alsace-lorraine; On The Ill; About 2 Miles W. Of The Rhine, To Which Its Glacis Extends; 250 Miles E. By S. Of Paris, And About 370 Miles S. W. Of Berlin. By Means Of Canals ...

Stratford On Avon
Stratford-on-avon, A Town Of Warwickshire, England; 8 Miles S. W. Of Warwick; On The Right Bank Of The Avon River. The River Is Here Crossed By A Fine Bridge Of 14 Pointed Arches, Now Nearly 400 Years Old, Still Known As Clopton Bridge, After Its Builder, Sir Hugh Clopton, An ...

Stratum
Stratum, A Bed Or Mass Of Matter Spread Out Over A Certain Surface, In Most Cases By The Action Of Water, But Sometimes Also By That Of Wind. The Method In Which Stratification By The Agency Of Water Has Been Effected In Bygone Times May Be Understood By A Study ...

Straw
Straw. Apart From The Importance Of The Straw Of Various Cereal Plants As A Feeding And Bedding Material In Agri Culture, Such Substances Also Possess No Inconsiderable Value For Packing Mer Chandise, For Thatching, For Making Mat Tresses, And For Door Mats. Straw Is Also A Paper-making Material Of Some ...

Street Railways
Street Railways, An Institution Of American Origin, Though First Sug Gested By The Tramways Used For Carry Ing Coal In The British Collieries. In Terest In Street Railways First Developed In 1829, When The Agitation For Steam Railways Was Going On In This Country. Finally Action Was Taken, In 1832, ...

Stricture
Stricture, A Term Employed In Sur Gery To Denote An Unnatural Contraction, Either Congenital Or Acquired, Of A Mu Cous Canal, Such As The Urethra, (esopha Gus, Or Intestine. When, However, The Affected Part Is Not Mentioned, And A Person Is Stated To Suffer From Stricture, It Is Always The ...

Strikes And Lockouts
Strikes And Lockouts. The Strike Is A Feature Of Industrial Life En Tirely Unknown Before The Development Of The Factory System Of Production, Which In Turn Was Made Possible By The Invention Of The Steam Engine And Steam Driven Machinery. Previously Manufac Turing Had Been In The Hands Of Indi ...

Strychnos
Strychnos, In Botany, The Typical Genus Of Strychnesi. Calyx, Five-parted; Corolla Tubular, Funnel-shaped, Limb Spreading; Stamens Five, Inserted Into The Throat Of The Corolla; Ovary Two-celled; Style One; Fruit, A Berry With A Hard Rind And A Pulpy Sarcocarp; Seeds Many. Natives Of Asia, America, And Australia. S. Nux Vomica, ...

Submarine Mines And Navi
Submarine Mines And Navi Gation. Submarine Mines Consist Of Spherical Or Cylindrical Containers, Usu Ally Made Of Steel, And Sometimes Lined With Concrete, Filled With A Charge Of Ex Plosives. They Are Generally Anchored In Such A Manner That They Are Concealed Beneath The Surface Of The Sea, But They ...

Submarine Telegraphy
Submarine Telegraphy, The Transmission Of Messages By Electricity Under The Sea. The Sending Of Messages By Telegraph From One Country To An Other, Through Wires Buried Many Thou Sand Feet Beneath The Water Has Come Into General Use Since 1851, Though The Conception Of Its Possibility Dated Back Many Years ...

Substance
Substance, In Philosophy, That Which Is And Abides As Distinguished From Accident, Which Has No Existence Of Itself, And Is Essentially Mutable. The Derivation Of The Word In This Sense Is, According To Augustine, From The Latin Subsistere, And So = That Which Subsists Of Or By Itself; Locke Prefers ...

Succession
Succession, In Music, The Order In Which The Notes Of A Melody Proceed. There Are Two Sorts Of Succession, Reg Ular, Or Conjoint, And Disjunct. A Regu Lar Or Conjoint Succession Is That In Which The Notes Succeed Each Other In The Order Of The Scale To Which They Belong, ...

Succession Wars
Succession Wars, The General Name Given To Contests Which Took Place In Europe During The 18th Century On The Extinction Of Certain Dynasties Or Ruling Houses. Four Such Wars Are Usu Ally Enumerated — That Of The Spanish Succession (1701-1713), Of The Polish Succession (1733-1738), Of The Austrian Succession (1740-1748), ...

Sudan
Sudan, The Arab Name Given To The Vast Extent Of Country In Central Africa Which Lies Between The Sahara On The N., Abyssinia And The Red Sea On The E., The Countries Draining To The Kongo Basin On The S., And Senegambia On The W. Its Area Is Estimated At ...

Suez Canal
Suez Canal. It Is Certain That In Ancient Times A Canal Connecting, In Directly, The Mediterranean And Red Seas Did Exist. At What Period It Was Constructed Is Not So Certain. Herodotus Ascribes Its Projection And Partial Execu Tion To Pharaoh Necho (about 600 B. C.) ; Aristotle, Strabo, And ...

Suffrage
Suffrage, The Right To Vote For Any Purpose, But More Especially The Right Of A Person To Vote In The Election Of His Political Representative. Many Writers Advocate The Universal Extension Of This Right, But In Great Britain And Most European Countries It Is Limited By A Household Or Other ...

Sugar
Sugar, A Sweet, Crystallized Sub Stance Manufactured From The Expressed Juice Of Various Plants, Especially From The Sugar Cane; Also, Any Substance, More Or Less Resembling Sugar In Any Of Its Properties; As Sugar Of Lead; Figuratively, Sweet, Honeyed, Or Soothing Words Or Flattery, Used To Disguise Or Hide Some ...

Sugars
Sugars. Sugar Is The Generic Name For A Class Of Substances 'belonging To The Carbohydrate Group. They Either Occur Naturally In The Animal Or Vege Table Kingdom, Or Are Produced By The Action Of Dilute Acids Or Ferments On Another Class Of Bodies Known As Glu Cosides. As A Class, ...

Suicide
Suicide, The Act Of Designedly De Stroying One's Own Life. To Constitute Suicide, In A Legal Sense, The Person Must Be Of The Years Of Discretion And Of A Sound Mind. The Law Of England Treats Suicide As A Felony Involving The For Feiture To The Crown Of All The ...

Sulphur
Sulphur. Sulphur, Or Brimstone, Has Been Known And Used From The Earliest Times. It Is Found Native In Mechanical Combination With Various Earthy Impuri Ties In Most Volcanic Districts, More Par Ticularly In Sicily And The Countries Bordering On The Mediterranean, And In Louisiana And Texas. The Native Sulphur Of ...

Sulphuric Acid
Sulphuric Acid, A Very Important Acid Which Occurs In Nature In Large Quantities, Both In The Vegetable And Mineral Kingdoms, In Combination With The Various Bases, More Particularly The Alkalies, Alkaline Earths, And The Oxides Of Iron, Copper, Lead, Zinc, Alumina, Etc. Its Mineral Combinations Are Generally Known As Vitriols, ...

Sumatra
Sumatra, An Island In The Indian Seas Immediately Under The Equator; Sep Arated From The Peninsula Of Malacca By The Straits Of Malacca And From Java By The Straits Of Sunda ; Greatest Length About 1,000 Miles; Breadth, About 240 Miles; Area, 161,600 Square Miles; Pop. About 4,500,000. Banca And ...

Summary Treaty Of St
Treaty Of St. Germain, Summary On June 2 There Had Been Handed Tc The Austrian Delegates A Preliminary Treaty Which Covered Certain Points, But Left Others To Be Dealt With Later. Austria Must Accept The Covenant Of The League Of Nations And The Labor Char Ter. She Must Renounce All ...

Sumptuary Laws
Sumptuary Laws, Laws Intended To Repress Extravagance, Especially In Eating And Drinking, And In Dress. They Were Common In Ancient Times, And Also Appear In The Old Statute Books Of Most Modern Nations. They Were More Fre Quently Enacted In Ancient Rome Than In Greece. After The Twelve Tables, The ...

Sunday School
Sunday - School, According To Schaff, "an Assembly Of Persons On The Lord's Day For The Study Of The Bible, Moral And Religious Instruction, And The Worship Of The True God. It Is A Method Of Training The Young And Ignorant In The Duties We Owe To God And To ...

Sunnites
Sunnites, The Name Commonly Given To Orthodox Muslims, Because In Their Rule Of Faith And Manners The Sunna, Or Traditionary Teaching Of The Prophet, Is Added To The Koran. According To Islam The Human Mind Is Incapable Of Attain Ing Light In Law Or Religion But Through The Prophet, And ...

Sunstroke
Sunstroke (otherwise Called Heat Stroke, Heat Apoplexy, Heat As Phyxia, Coup De Soliel) , A Very Fatal Affection Of The Nervous System, Which Is Very Common In India And Tropical Countries, And Also In More Favored Regions In Extremely Hot Weather. The Symptoms Of The Disease Are Liable To Be ...

Superstition
Superstition, Credulity Regarding The Supernatural, Or Matters Beyond Human Powers; Belief In The Direct Agency Of Superior Powers In Certain Events; As A Belief In Witchcraft, Appari Tions, Magic, Omens, Charms And The Like, A Belief That The Fortunes Of Individuals Are Or Can Be Affected By Things Deemed Lucky ...

Supreme Council Of The
Supreme Council Of The Paris Peace Conference. In January, 1919, When The Representatives Of The Allied Powers And Those Nations Which Had Been Associated With Them In The War Against The Central Empires, As Sembled In Paris To Draft The Terms Of Peace, The Delegates Of The Four Powers, England, ...

Supreme Court Of The
Supreme Court Of The United States. In Accordance With The Pro Visions Of The United States Constitution There Was Organized In 1789 A Supreme Court, John Jay Receiving The First Ap Pointment As Chief Justice. With Him Were Joined As Associate Judges John Rutledge, Of South Carolina ; James Wil ...

Surface Tension
Surface Tension, In Liquids, That Property In Virtue Of Which A Liquid Sur Face Behaves As If It Were A Stretched Elastic Membrane—say A Sheet Of India Rubber. The Idea Is Due To Segner (1751) ; But It Was Young Who In 1805 First Applied It Successfully To The Ex ...

Surgery
Surgery, Manual Intervention, Me Diate And Immediate, In All Lesions Or Malformations Of The Human Body. It Was Already An Art When Medicine Proper Was But A Phase Of Superstition. The Earliest Notices Of It Occur Among The Egyptians, Who, As We Find Represented On Obelisk And In Temple, Practiced ...

Surveying
Surveying, The Act Or Art Of Deter Mining The Boundaries, Form, Area, Posi Tion, Contour, Etc., Of Any Portion Of The Earth's Surface, Tract Of Country, Coast, Etc., By Means Of Measurements Taken On The Spot; The Art Of Determining The Form, Area, Surface, Contour, Etc., Of Any Portion Of ...

Swan
Swan, In Ornithology, Any Individual Of The Genus Cygnus. The Swans Form A Sharply-defined Group; The Body Is Elon Gated, The Neck Very Long, Head Moderate; Beak About As Long As Head; Legs Short, And Placed Far Back. On The Under Sur Face The Plumage Is Thick And Fur Like; ...

Swansea
Swansea (welsh, Abertawe), A Sea Port Of Glamorganshire, South Wales, On The Banks And At The Mouth Of The Tawe River, 45 Miles W. N. W. Of Cardiff And 216 W. Of London. A Municipal, Parlia Mentary, And Also (since 1888) County Borough, It Is The Most Important Town In ...

Swearing
Swearing, The Habit Of Using The Name Or Attributes Of God In A Light And Familiar Manner By Way Of Asseveration Or Emphasis. It Was Specially Con Demned By The Mosaic Law, Was Long Pun Ished By Severe Penalties, And Is Still An Actionable Offense In England. By Oaths Are ...

Sweating Sickness
Sweating Sickness, An Extremely Fatal Epidemical Disorder Which Ravaged Europe, And Especially England In The 15th And 16th Centuries. It Derives Its Name "because It Did Most Stand In Sweating From The Beginning Till The Endyng," And, "because It First Beganne In Englande, It Was Named In Other Coun Tries ...

Sweden
Sweden (swedish, Sverige), A King Dom Of Northern Europe Comprising With Norway And Lapland The Whole Of The Scandinavian Peninsula, Of Which It Forms The E., S., And Most Important Por Tion; Having N. E. Russian Finland; E. And S. The Gulf Of Bothnia And The Baltic; S. W. The ...

Swimming
Swimming, The Art Of Propelling One's Self Through Water By Motions Of The Arms And Legs; Is A Highly Useful Art And A Gymnastic Exercise Of The First Order. It Has Been Introduced As A Feature Of Physical Training In Some Public Schools. There Are Numerous Me Chanical Aids To ...

Swiss Guards
Swiss Guards, A Celebrated Corps Or Regiment Of Swiss Mercenaries In The French Army Of The Old Regime, Consti Tuted As "gardes" By Royal Decree In 1616. They Were Ever Unswerving In Their Fidelity To The Bourbon Kings, And Their Courage Never Blazed More Brightly Than On The Steps Of ...

Switzerland
Switzerland, A Federal Republic Of Central Europe; Bounded N. By Alsace Lorraine And Baden, From Which It Is Separated For The Most Part By The Rhine; N. E. By Wiirttemberg And Ba Varia, From Which It Is Separated By The Lake Of Constance; E. By Austria And The Principality Of ...

Sword
Sword, A Weapon Of Offense Consist Ing Of A Blade Fitted Into A Hilt Or Handle, With A Guard, The Blade Being Formed To Cut Or To Pierce, Generally To Do Both. It Is The Most Highly Honored Of All Weap Ons, A Symbol Of Military Dignity And Au Thority; ...

Sydney
Sydney, The Capital Of New South Wales And The Parent City Of Australia, Picturesquely Situated On The S. Shore Of Port Jackson, The Shore Line Being Deeply Indented By Capacious Bays Or In Lets Which Form Harbors In Themselves, And Are Lined With Wharves, Quays, And Warehouses. Some Of The ...

Sylvanus Thayer
Thayer, Sylvanus, An American Military Officer; Born In Braintree, Mass., June 9, 1785; Was Graduated At Dart Mouth College In 1807; And The United States Military Academy In 1808; And Assigned To The Engineer Corps. He Was Employed On Engineer Duty On The E. Coast, And As An Instructor Of ...

Symbiosis
Symbiosis, A Biological Term Intro Duced By De Bary To Denote Certain Kinds Of Physiological Partnership Between Or Ganisms Of Different Kinds. Consortism Is Synonymous. As There Are Many Kinds Of Organic Association, It Is Convenient To Restrict The Term Symbiosis To Such Intimate And Complementary Partner Ships As Exist ...

Symbol
Symbol, That Which Specially Distin Guishes One Regarded In A Particular Character, Or As Occupying A Particular Office, And Fulfilling Its Duties; A Figure Marking The Individuality Of Some Being Or Thing; As, A Trident Is The Symbol Of Neptune. In Chemistry, An Abbreviation Of The Name Of An Elementary ...

Symmetrical
Symmetrical, In Botany (of The Parts Of A Flower), Related To Each Other In Number, The Same In Number, Or One A Multiple Of The Other, As In Saxifraga, Which Has Five Divisions Of The Calyx, Five Petals, And Five Stamens; Or Epilobiunn, Which Has A Four-parted Calyx, Four Pet ...

Symphony
Symphony, In Music, A Form Of Orchestral Composition. The Name Was Originally Applied To The Purely Instru Mental Portions Of Works Primarily Vo Cal, Under It Being Included Overtures To Operas And Oratorios As Well As Ritornelli And The Introduction To Choruses And Ar Ias. It Received Its First Restrictive ...

Synagogue
Synagogue, A Congregation Or As Sembly Of Jews For The Purpose Of Wor Ship Or The Performance Of Religious Rites. Also, A Building R,et Apart For Jewish As A Church Or Chapel Is For Christian Worship. Under The Mosaic Law Worship Of The Highest Type Could Take Place Only At ...

Syncretistic Controversy
Syncretistic Controversy, The Name Given To A Series Of Contro Versies Which Arose In The Lutheran Church In The 17th Century, From The Subject Of The Discussion—the Promotion Of Fellowship And Union Between The Protestant Churches Of Germany. These Controversies May Be Grouped Into Three Periods: (1) From The Colloquy ...

Syndicalism
Syndicalism, Broadly Speaking, Is A Branch Of The General Socialist Move Ment Which Has As Its Object A Complete Reorganization Of Society On A Co-opera Tive Basis. The First Concept Of Social Ism Was That The Workers Should Own And Control The Industries Through A Pro Letarian State, Or Government, ...

Synesius
Synesius, Bishop Of Ptolemais In The Libyan Pentapolis, Acted Also The Vari Ous Parts Of Soldier, Diplomatist, Orator, Philosopher And Poet; Born In Cyrene About A. D. 375. The Contemporary Of Augustine, He Took Pride In Tracing His Descent From The Heraclidx, The Royal Family Of Sparta, Who First Colonized ...

Syphilis
Syphilis, According To Dr. Farr, A Disease Belonging To The Enthetic Order Of Zymotic Diseases. It May Be Defined As A Specific Disease Produced By The Con Tagion Of The Same Disease In Another Person, And Characterized (1) In Its Primary Form By The Appear Ance On The Part Inoculated ...

Syracuse
Syracuse, Anciently A Famous City Of Sicily; On The S. E. Coast Of The Island; 80 Miles S. S. W. Of Messina; Was Founded By Corinthian Settlers About 733 B. C. The Colonists Seem To Have Occupied The Little Isle Of Ortygia, Which Stretches S. E. From The Shore. The ...

Syracuse_2
Syracuse, A City Of New York, The County Seat Of Onondaga Co. It Is On The Onondaga Lake, The New York State Barge Canal, The Delaware, Lackawanna And Western, And The Ontario And West Ern Railroads. There Are Six Interurban Lines Radiating From The City Which Give Excellent Passenger And ...

Syria
Syria, Asiatic Turkey, Bounded By Euphrates And Syrian Desert On The East, By The Mediterranean On The West, By Alma Dagh Mountains, North, And Egypt, South. Area, 114,530. Pop. Be Fore The World War About 3,500,000. The Physical Conformation Of Syria Is Throughout Simple And Uniform. A Range Of Mountains, ...

Syriac
Syriac, A Dialect Or Branch Of The Aramaic, And Thus One Of The Semitic Family Of Languages. It Was A Vernacu Lar Dialect In Syria During The Early Cen Turies Of Our Era, But Ceased To Be Spoken As A Living Language About The 10th Cen Tury, Being Crowded Out ...

Tabernacle
Tabernacle, A Slightly Constructed Temporary Building Or Habitation; A Tent, A Pavilion. Figuratively, A Temple; A Place Of Worship; A Sacred Place; Speci Fically, The Sacred Tent Built By Moses And Maintained As The Central Place Of Worship For Israel Till Solomon Built The Temple. Also, The Human Frame As ...

Tacitus
Tacitus, The Historian, Is Known To Us Chiefly From Autobiographical Touches In His Own Writings And From Allusions In Pliny's Letters. His Full Name Is Mat Ter Of Doubt—cornelius Tacitus Being His Nomen And Cognomen; But Whether His Prmnomen Was Publics Or Gaius Can Only Be Conjectured. Born Perhaps In ...