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Collier's New Encyclopedia, Volume 9

Taipings
Taipings, The Name Given By For Eigners To The Followers Of Hung Ch'wan (s'eiw-tseuen), Who Raised The Standard Of Rebellion In China In 1851, And Whose Enterprise Was Finally Sup Pressed In 1865. The Leader Hung Was Born In 1813 In A Poor Agricultural Village Of The Dis Trict Of ...

Talc
Talc, An Orthorhombic Mineral Oc Curring In Short Hexagonal Prisms And Plates, Also In Globular And Stellated Groups, Compact, Massive. Cleavage, Basal; Luster, Pearly; Color, Apple-green, White, Shades Of Gray; Sectile; Feel, Greasy. Composition, Varying With The Amount Of Water Present, But Essentially A Hydrated Silicate Of Magnesia Which, When ...

Talent
Talent, Figuratively: (1) A Gift, En Dowment, Or Faculty; Some Peculiar Fac Ulty, Ability, Power, Or Accomplishment, Natural Or Acquired (a Metaphor Bor Rowed From The Parable In Matt. Xxv: 14-30). (2) Mental Endowments Or Ca Pacities Of A Superior Kind; General Men Tal Power (used In Either The Singular ...

Talmud
Talmud, The Name Of The Funda Mental Code Of The Jewish Civil And Can Onical Law, Comprising The "mishna" And The "gemara," The Former As The Text, The Later As The Commentary And Comple Ment. The Oldest Codification Of Hala Choth, Or Single Ordinances, Is Due To The School Of ...

Tanagers 7
Tanagers (7' Anagridm) , A Family Of The Passeriformes, Or Perching Birds, Containing Nearly 400 Species; The Bill Is Usually Conical (sometimes Depressed Or Attenuated), More Or Less Triangular At The Base, With The Cutting Edges Not Much Inflected, And Frequently Notched Near The Tip Of The Upper Mandible. This ...

Tangent
Tangent, In Geometry, A Straight Line Which Meets Or Touches A Circle Or Curve In One Point, And Which, Being Pro Duced, Will Not Cut It. In Euclid (iii. 16, Cor.) It Is Proved That Any Line Drawn At Right Angles To The Diameter Of A Circle At Its Extremity ...

Tanks
Tanks, Engines Of War First Employed By The British In Their Attack On The Somme (france) In September 15, 1916. The Application Of The Invention To War Purposes Is Credited Partly To Majoi General E. D. Swinton Of The Royal En Gineers And Later Of The British War Cabinet, Who ...

Tapestry
Tapestry, An Ornamental Textile Used For The Covering Of Walls And Furni Ture, And For Curtains And Hangings. In Its Method Of Manufacture It Is Inti Mately Related To Oriental Carpets, Which Are Made In Precisely The Same Way As Certain Kinds Of Tapestry, The Only Dis Tinction Being That ...

Tapeworm
Tapeworm, An Intestinal Worm, Twnia Mixon, In Form Somewhat Resem Bling Tape. Its Length Is From 5 To 15 Yards, And Its Breadth From Two Lines At The Narrowest Part To Four Or Five At The Other Or Broader Extremity. At The Nar Row End Is The Head, Which Is ...

Tapti
Tapti, A River Of Bombay, India; Ris Ing In The Betus District Of The Central Provinces, And Flowing 450 Miles W. Through The Satpura Uplands And The Dis Tricts Of Candeish And Surat To The Gulf Of Cambay; 17 Miles Below The Town Of Surat. Even Small Vessels Of 40 ...

Target Practice
Target Practice. The Use Of Stationary Targets For Practice In The United States Army Has Given Place To That Of Appearing And Disappearing Tar Gets, Which Stimulate Activity And In Crease The Skill Of The Gunners. Ameri Can Soldiers, And Particularly Those Of The Regular Service, Have The Reputation Of ...

Targijk
Targijk, The General Term For The Aramaic Versions—often Paraphrases— )f The Old Testarrient, Which Became Necessary When, After And Perhaps Dur Ing The Babylonian Exile, Hebrew Began To Die Out As The Popular Language, And Was Supplanted By Aramais. The Origin Of The Targum Itself Is Shrouded In Mystery. The ...

Tariff
Tariff, A List Or Table Of Goods With The Duties Or Customs To Which They Are Liable, Either On Exportation Or Importa Tion; A List Or Table Of Duties Or Customs To Be Paid On Goods Imported Or Exported, Whether Such Duties Are Imposed By The Government Of A Country ...

Tarsus
Tarsus, The Ancient Capital Of And One Of The Most Important Cities In Asia Minor; On The Cydnus River; 12 Miles From The Sea In The Midst Of A Pro Ductive Plain. It Was A Great Emporium For The Traffic Carried On Between Syria, Egypt, And The Central Region Of ...

Tasmania
Tasmania, Formerly Van Diemen's Land, An Island In The Southern Ocean, 100 Miles S. Of Australia, From Which It Is Separated By Bass Strait; Greatest Length, 186 Miles; Mean Breadth, 165 Miles; Area, 26,215 Square Miles; Pop. (est. 1919), 270,881. The Capital Is Ho Bart On The S. Coast; Pop. ...

Taste
Taste, One Of The Special Senses. The Parts Of The Mouth Affected By Sapid Sub Stances Are The Surface And Sides Of The Tongue, The Roof Of The Mouth, And The Entrance To The Pharynx. The Mucous Membrane Is Invested By Stratified Squa Mous Epithelium, Which, Over The Surface Of ...

Tatian
Tatian, A Christian Apologist; Born Early In The 2d Century (110, Zahn) ; Was An Assyrian By Birth; Studied Greek Phil Osophy; And Wandered About As A Soph Ist Round The Roman World; But About 150 At Rome Was Won To Christianity By The Simple Charm Of The Old Testament ...

Tattooing
Tattooing, The Custom Of Marking The Skin With Figures Of Various Kinds By Means Of Slight Incisions Or Punctures And A Coloring Matter. The Word Itself Is Tahitian (ta, "a Mark"), But The Practice Is Very Widely Spread, Being Uni Versal In The South Sea Islands, And Also Found Among ...

Tavoy
Tavoy, A District In The Tenasserim Division Of British Burma; Area, 5,308 Square Miles; Pop. About 110,000. The Country Is Mountainous With Thick For Ests And Jungle, And The Chief Rivers Are The Tavoy And The Tenasserim. The Chief Town And The Headquarters Of The Deputy-commissioner Is Tavoy, About 30 ...

Taxidermy
Taxidermy, The Name Given To The Art Of Putting Up Natural History Speci Mens In The Dried State. It Includes The Skinning And Stuffing Of Fishes, Reptiles, Amphibians, Birds, And Mammals; Insects And Other Invertebrata. But It Does Not Properly Comprise The Making Of Wet Zo Ological Preparations Which Are ...

Tchudi
Tchudi, A Name Given By The Rus Sians To The Finnic Races In The N. W. Of Russia. It Is Now More Generally Ap Plied To Designate The Group Of Peoples Of Which The Finns, The Esthonians, The Livonians, And The Laplanders Are Mem Bers. Tea, The Dried Leaf Of ...

Te Deum
Te Deum ("te Dezon, Laudomus," "we Praise Thee, 0 God"), A Well-known Latin Hymn Of The Western Church—so Called From Its First Words—sung At The End Of Matins On All Feasts Except Inno Cents' Day, And On All Sundays Except During Penitential Seasons. The Hymn Is One Of The Most ...

Teachers Pensions
Teachers' Pensions, The Grant Ing Of Pensions To Teachers After Super Annuation By The State, Municipality Or By A Combination Of Either Of These Two And A Professional Organization Of The Teachers Themselves. Teachers May Be Divided Into Two Classes: Contributory And Non-contributory. Contributory Pen Sions Are Granted From A ...

Teak
Teak, Tectona Grandis, One Of The Most Valuable Timbers Known; The Wood• Of A Large Deciduous Tree (natural Or Der Verbenacem) With Leaves From 10 To 20 Inches In Length, And From 8 To 15 Inches In Breadth. The Tree, Which Has Small White Flowers In Panicles, Is Found In ...

Technical Education
Technical Education. Techni Cal Education As The Term Is Now Used Is A Branch Of Professional Education. The Name Itself Might Properly Include Military Education, Agricultural Educa Tion, Or Industrial Education. But These Branches Have Their Own Specific Designa Tions, And It Is Only With The Last Named That Technical ...

Telegraph
Telegraph, An Apparatus Or Proc Ess For The Rapid Communication Of Intel Ligence Between Distant Points, Especially By Means Of Electromagnetism. The In Vention Of The Electric Telegraph, As Now Used In All Parts Of The World, Is Due To Samuel F. B. Morse, Who, In 1832, Dur Ing A ...

Telepathy
Telepathy, The Power Of Communi Cation Between One Mind And Another By Means Unknown To The Ordinary Sense Organs, And Usually Called Thought Trans Ference. Members Of The Society For Psychical Research Believe That They Have Established The Fact That Such Power Exists In The Material Universe And Have Attempted ...

Telephone
Telephone, An Instrument For Transmitting Sounds Or Speech To Distances Where Such Would Be Inaudible Through Aerial Sound Waves. This Definition Ex Cludes Speaking Tubes, Which Act Simply By Preserving And Concentrating Sound Waves. Telephonic Action Depends On The Fact That Sound Waves In Air Are Capable Of Communicating Vibrations ...

Telescope
Telescope, An Optical Instrument To Assist The Naked Eye In Examining Distant Objects. It Does This In Two Ways—by Magnifying The Apparent Angular Dimen Sions Of The Object, And By Collecting More Light Than The Pupil Of The Eye Could Alone Do To Form The Image On The Retina. One ...

Temperance M O V
Temperance M O V E M E N T, A Movement Designed (1) To Minimize Or (2) To Abolish The Use Of Alcoholic Liquors As Beverages. In The First Sense The Word "temperance" Is Used Strictly, I. E., The Aim At Moderation In The Use Of Liquors; In The Second ...

Temperature
Temperature, The Thermal Condi Tion Of A Body Which Determines The In Terchange Of Heat Between It And Other Bodies. Our First Ideas Of Temperature Are Derived From Our Sensations Of Hot And Cold. The Effect Of Adding Heat To A Body Is To Make It Hotter, Unless It Is ...

Temperature Of The Body
Temperature Of The Body. The Terms Cold-blooded And Warm-blooded Animals Serve Roughly To Indicate, The Former, Those Animals Which Possess A Temperature Little Raised Above That Of The Surrounding Medium; The Latter, Those With One Considerably Higher. Fishes, Frogs, And Reptiles Are Cold-blood Ed Animals, While Birds And Quadrupeds Are ...

Templars
Templars, A Famous Military Order, Which, Like The Hospitallers And The Teu Tonic Knights, Owed Its Origin To The Cru Sades. In The Year 1119 Two Comrades Of Godfrey De Bouillon, Hugues De Payen And Geoffroi De Saint-adhemar, Bound Themselves And Seven Other French Knights To Guard Pilgrims To The ...

Temple
Temple, An Edifice Erected And Dedi Cated To The Service Of Some Deity Or Deities, And Connected With Some Pagan System Of Worship. The Term Is General Ly Applied To Such Structures Among The Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, And Other Ancient Nations, As Well As To Structures Serving The Same Purpose ...

Tennessee
Tennessee, A State In The South At Lantic Division Of The North American Union; Bounded By Kentucky, Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mis Sissippi, Arkansas, And Missouri; Admit Ted To The Union, June 1, 1796; Capital, Nashville; Number Of Counties, 96; Area, 42,050 Square Miles; Pop. (1890) 1,767, 518; (1900) ...

Terminalia
Terminalia, In Roman Antiquities, A Festival Celebrated Annually On Feb. 23, In Honor Of Terminus, The God Of Boun Daries. It Was Then Usual For Peasants To Assemble Near The Principal Landmarks Which Separated Their Fields, And, After They Had Crowned Them With Garlands And Flowers, To Make Libations Of ...

Termites
Termites (termitidx), A Family Of Insects In The Order Corrodentia, Or, Ac Cording To Some Systems, Pseudo-neurop Tera. They Are Often Called "white Ants," But Ants Are Hymenopterous Insects, And Do Not Occur Before Tertiary Times, Whereas The Termites Seem To Have Lived From Carboniferous Ages Onward. Yet, Like The ...

Terrapin
Terrapin, The Popular Name Of Sev Eral Species Of Fresh-water Or Tide-water Tortoises Forming The Family Emydidx, Distinguished By A Horny Beak, A Shield Covered With Epidermic Plates, And Feet Partly Webbed. They Are Active In Their Habits, Swimming Well And Moving With Greater Agility On Land Than The Land ...

Terrier
Terrier, A Name Originally Applied To Any Breed Of Dog Used To Burrow Un Derground, But Now Applied To Any Small Dog. Terriers May Be Divided Into Three Classes: Those Able To Follow Their Game Into Its Earth, Those Kept For Hunting Above-ground, And Those Kept Merely As Companions. Among ...

Tertiary
Tertiary, A Color, As Citrine, Russet, Or Alive, Produced By The Mixture Of The Two Secondary Colors. More Correctly Speaking, They Are Grays, And Are Either Red-gray, Or Yellow-gray, When These Pri Maries Are In Excess, Or They Are Violet Gray, Orange-gray, Or Green-gray, When These Secondaries Are In Excess. ...

Testing Machines
Testing Machines, Machines Used For The Accurate Testing Of Iron, Steel And Other Materials Used In Con Structive Work. The Problem Which These Machines Are Intended To Solve Is The Adjustment With Certainty Of A Safe Mar Gin Of Strength With A Minimum Of Weight, Which Can Be Determined Only ...

Teutonic Knights
Teutonic Knights, One Of The Three Military-religious Orders Of Knight Hood Founded During The Period Of The Crusades. Certain Merchants Of Bremen And Liibeck, Witnessing The Sufferings Of The Wounded Christians Before Acre In 1190 Were So Moved With Compassion That They Erected Tent Hospitals For Them. There Had Been ...

Texas
Texas, A State In The South Central Division Of The North American Union; Bounded By Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisi Ana, New Mexico, The States Of Chihua Hua, Coahuila, Tamaulipas In Mexico, And The Gulf Of Mexico; Admitted To The Union Dec. 29, 1845; Capital, Austin; Number Of Counties, 253; Area, 265,780 ...

Textile Manufacturing
Textile Manufacturing. Those Manufactures In The Industrial Field Comprise The Production From Raw Materials Of Silk, Cotton, Woo], Flax, Jute And Hemp, As Well As Knit Goods, Includ Ing Hosiery, With Laces, Embroideries And Braids, With Their Accessories. The In Dustry Has Grown In Recent Times To Enormous Dimensions. The ...

Thames
Thames, The Most Important River Of Great Britain; Usually Said To Rise About 3 Miles S. W. Of Cirencester In Glouces Tershire, Near A Bridge Over The Thames And Severn Canal, Called Thameshead Bridge, But Is More Properly Formed By The Isis, Churn, Colne, And Leach, Which Have Their Sources ...

The Sarre
The Sarre In Compensation For The Destruction Of Coal Mines In Northern France And As Payment On Account Of Reparation, Ger Many Cedes To France Full Ownership Of The Coal Mines Of The Sarre Basin With Their Subsidiaries, Accessories And Facili Ties. Their Value Will Be Estimated By The Reparation ...

Thebes
Thebes, The Name Of A Celebrated Egyptian City, Formerly The Capital Of Southern Or Upper Egypt; Called By The Egyptians Tuabu, By The Hebrews No Amon, By The Greeks Thebm, And At A Later Period Diospolis Magna. It Lies In The Broadest Section Of The Valley Of The Nile, In ...

Theism
Theism, Etymologically Equivalent To Belief In A God Or Gods, And As Such Op Posed To Atheism (q. V.), Is Now Usually Understood To Mean The Doctrine Of The One, Supreme, Personal God, "in Whom We Live, And Move, And Have Our Being"—as Distinguished From Polytheism (q. V.), Which Recognizes ...

Themistocles
Themistocles, An Athenian Eral And Statesman; Born About 520 B. C. His Father, Neocles, Belonged To An Undistinguished Family Of The Middle Class; His Mother Was A Carian. Am Bitious, He Used His Archonship Of 493 For The Promotion Of His Political Plans. He Saw What Was Best For Athens ...

Theocritus
Theocritus, A Greek Poet; A Native Of Syracuse And Son Of Praxagoras And Philina. Suidas, However, Says That Some Made Him The Son Of Simichus Or Si Machidas, And That He Was A Native Of Cos And Only A Metoikos At Syracuse. This Statement Vanishes On Investigation. Theocritus Seems To ...

Theodolite
Theodolite, A Most Important In Strument For Measuring Horizontal And Vertical Angles, But Particularly Adapted For Accurately Measuring The Former. Its Principle Is Identical With That Of The Altitude And Azimuth Instrument; The Construction And Purpose Of The Two, However, Differ, The Latter Being Employed For Astronomical Purposes, While The ...

Theodore Thomas
Thomas, Theodore, A German American Musician; Born In Esens, Han Over, Germany, Oct. 11, 1835. He First Played In Public At The Age Of Six. In 1845 His Family Removed To The United States And For Two Years He Played Violin Solos At Concerts In New York. He Then Traveled ...

Theology
Theology, A Term Applied By The Classic Authors To Treatises On The Nature And Worship Of The Gods, Such As The "works And Days" Of Hesiod, And The "on The Nature Of The Gods" Of Cicero. Augustine Quotes Eusebius And Varro As Dividing Theology Into Three Kinds: The Fabulous, That ...

Theosophy
Theosophy, A Name Which Since The Time Of Ammonius Saccas, In The 3d Cen Tury After Christ, Has Been Used In The West To Cover Various Schools Of Relig Ious Philosophy, Which All Unite In The Fundamental Conception That Man, In His Innermost Nature, Is A Spiritual Being, One In ...

Thermo Chemistry
Thermo Chemistry. All Chemi Cal Reactions Are Accompanied By Changes In Temperature. Exactly When This Fact Was First Observed, It Is Impossible To Say, But It Must Have Been In The Very Early Years Of Chemical Investigation, For The Phenomenon Is So Marked That It Could Not Long Escape Notice. ...

Thermodynamics
Thermodynamics, The Branch Of Theoretical Physics Which Treats Of Heat As A Mechanical Agent, And Is The Basis On Which The Modern Doctrine Of Energy Is Built. The Second Interpretation Given By Newton Of His Third Law Of Motion All But Enumerates The Principle Of The Conservation Of Energy. Ignorant, ...

Thermoelectricity
Thermoelectricity, Electricity Produced At The Junction Of Two Metals, Or At A Point Where A Molecular Change Occurs In A Bar Of The Same Metal, When The Junction Or Point Is Heated Above Or Cooled Below The General Temperature Of The Conductor. Thus When Wires Or Bars Of Metal Or ...

Thermometer
Thermometer, In Physics, An In Strument For Measuring Intensity Of Heat Or Temperature, By Means Of Expansion Of A Liquid Or Gas. Mercury Is Generally Employed, And An Ordinary Thermometer Consists Of A Spherical Or Cylindrical Glass Bulb At The End Of A Very Fine Tube, The Bulb Being Completely ...

Thessaly
Thessaly, The Largest Division Of Ancient Greece; Lay S. Of Macedonia And E. Of Epirus; Being Separated From The Latter By Mount Pindus, And From The Former By The Cambunian Mountains; The Maliac Gulf And Mount Ceta Bound Ing It On The S. It Is A Vast Plain Shut In ...

Thiers
Thiers (te-ar'), Louis Adolphe, A French Statesman; Born In Marseilles, France, April 16, 1797. He Studied Law And At The Age Of 22 Was Admitted Advo Cate. He Soon Relinquished Law, However, For Literature And Politics (1821). After A Long Struggle With Poverty In Paris, He Won A High Reputation ...

Thimble
Thimble, A Metallic Cap Or Sheath Used To Protect The End Of The Finger In Sewing. Seamstresses Use A Thimble Having A Rounded End With Numerous Small Pits Or Indentations. Those Used By Tailors Are Open At The End. The Manufacture Of Thimbles Is Very Simple. Coin Silver Is Mostly ...

Thirty Years War 1618
Thirty Years' War (1618 To 1648), A War In Germany, At First A Strug Gle Between Roman Catholics And Prot Estants. Subsequently It Lost Its Relig. Ious Character And Became A Struggle For Political Ascendancy In Europe. On The One Side Were Austria, Nearly All The Roman Catholic Princes Of ...

Thomas Sydenham
Sydenham, Thomas, The "sommo Ippocratista Inglese" (supreme English Hippocratist), As Puccinotti Styles Him; Born In Winford Eagle In Dorsetshire In 1624. That He Belonged To One Of The County Families; That At 18 He Was En Tered At Magdalen Hall, Oxford; That His Studies Were, After Two Years, Inter Rupted ...

Thoracic Duct
Thoracic Duct, The Name Applied To The Tubular Structure In Which The Ab Sorbent System Of Vessels May Be Said To Terminate, And Into Which The Lacteals Of The Intestine Ultimately Pour Their Con Tained Fluid. It Thus Receives (1) The Products Of Digestion Or Chyle From The Lacteal Vessels ...

Thorn Apple
Thorn Apple, Datura, A Genus Of Plants Of The Natural Order Solanacece, Having A Tubular Five-cleft Calyx, A Large Funnel-shaped Five-lobed Corolla, And An Imperfectly Four-celled, Prickly, Or Un Armed Capsule. The Species Of This Genus Are Annual Herbaceous Plants, Rarely Shrubs Or Trees; They Are In Gen Eral Narcotic, ...

Thread
Thread, A Compound Cord Consist Ing Of Two Or More Single Yarns, Doubled And Twisted. In The Trade It Is Divided Into Lace, Stocking, And Sewing Thread. Any Fibrous Substance, Such As Cotton Or Flax, When It Is To Be Woven, Is First Spun Into Yarn, Which Is Sometimes Called ...

Thrush
Thrush, In Ornithology, The Name For Any Of The Turdidce. They Are Uni Versally Distributed Except In New Zea Land, And Are Very Highly Organized Birds, And It Is For This Reason, Perhaps, As Well As On Account Of Their Omnivorous Diet, That They Have Been Able To Estab Lish ...

Thucydides
Thucydides, Historian Of The Pelo Ponnesian War; Born In The Deme Halimus Most Probably In 471 B. C.; Was The Son Of Olorus And Hegesipyle, And Was Re Lated To Miltiades And Cimon. An Athe Nian Of Good Family, He Must Have Known Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Phi Dias, Protagoras, Gorgias, ...

Tibet
Tibet, A Dependency Of The Chinese Empire, In Central Asia, Between China And India; Area About 463,200 Square Miles; Pop. About 2,000,000. The Native Name Is Bod Or Bodyul. Tibet Is En Closed By The Kuenlun And The Himalaya Mountains. These Claims Run E. From A Mountain Knot At The ...

Tide
Tide, A Regular Periodic Oscillation To Which The Surface Of The Sea At Any Place Is Subject. The Oscillation Takes Place About Twice A Day, The Periodic Time Being, On An Average, About 12 Hours And 26 Minutes. Consequently If High Tide Occurs At Noon One Day, It Will Occur ...

Tierra Del Fuego
Tierra Del Fuego, An Archipelago Consisting Of A Group Of Several Large And Numerous Small Islands, Lying Off The S. Extremity Of South America; In Lat. S., Ion. 70° W.; Separated From The Continent By The Strait Of Magellan. Its Extreme S. Point Is Formed By Cape Horn. The Principal ...

Tiger
Tiger, In Zoology, The Felis Tigris (tigris Regalis, Gray), The Largest And Most Dangerous Of The Felidx, Exceeding The Lion Slightly In Size And Far Sur Passing Him In Destructiveness. It Is Purely Asiatic In Its Habitat, But Is Not By Any Means Confined To The Hot Plains Of India, ...

Tigris
Tigris, Next To The Euphrates, The Greatest River Of Former Asiatic Turkey; Rises On The S. Slope Of The Armenian Taurus Range In Kurdistan To The S. Of Lake Goljik. It Has A Sinuous Course In A S. E. Direction, Almost Parallel To That Of The Euphrates, Which River It ...

Tile
Tile, A Kind Of Thin Slab Of Baked Clay, Used For Covering Roofs, Paving Floors, Lining Furnaces Or Ovens, Construct Ing Drains, Etc. Tiles, Both Flat And Curved, Were In Great. Demand In Roman Architecture. Roofs Were Covered With The Flat And Curved Tiles Alternating. Tiles Are Manufactured By A ...

Timber
Timber, Trees Cut Down, Squared, Or Capable Of Being Squared, Into Beams, Rafters, Boards, Planks, Etc., To Be Em Ployed The Construction Of Houses, Ships, Etc., Or In Carpentry, Joinery, Etc. Timber Is Usually Sold By The Load. A Load Of Rough Or Unhewn Timber Is 40 Cubic Feet, And ...

Timbuktu
Timbuktu, A City Of The Sudan, Central Africa, In Lat. 17° 37' N. And Lon. 3° 5' W.; 6 Miles N. Of The Niger At The Extreme N. Point Of Its Course. The Town Is Triangular In Shape, And At Present Is Less Than Three Miles In Cir Cumference, Though ...

Time
Time. Time And Space Are The Two Great Elements With Which The Astronomer In The Observatory Has To Deal; Conse Quently A Great Part Of Astronomical Work, And A Great Part Of The Equipment Of Every Observatory, Is Devoted To The Determination Of Time In Various Ways And For Various ...

Timothy
Timothy ("one Who Honors God"), One Of The Companions Of St. Paul On His Missionary Travels. Timothy Was Born Either At Lystra Or Derbe; His Father Was A Greek, His Mother A Jewess (acts Xvi: 1-2). Both His Mother, Eunice, And His Grandmother, Lois, Were Christians (ii Tim. I:5), Having ...

Timur
Timur (te-mor'), Called Also Timur Beg And Timurt Lenk (that Is, Timur The Lame), And, By Corruption, Tamerlane, A Celebrated Oriental Conqueror, Of Mon Gol Or Tartar Race; Born In The Territory Of Kesh, Near Samarcand, In 1336. His Ancestors Were Chiefs Of The District, And Timur By His Energy ...

Tintoretto Ii
Tintoretto Ii., A Venetian Painter; Real Name Jacopo Robusti; Re Ceived His Well-known Surname From The Fact Of His Father Being A Dyer (tin Tore) ; Born In Venice In 1512. He Studied For A Few Days Under Titian, But Soon Deserted The Studio Of The Master For Some Unknown ...

Tippoo Sahib
Tippoo Sahib, More Correctly Tipu Sultan, Sultan Of Mysore, And Son Of Ryder Ali; Born In 1749. From The French Officers In His Father's Service He Acquired A Considerable Acquaintance With European Military Tactics. This Knowledge He Put To Effective Use During His Father's Various Wars By Complete Ly Routing ...

The Great Theodosius I
Theodosius I., The Great, Son Of Theodosius The Elder; One Of The Most Notable And Most Capable Of The Later Ro Man Emperors; Born In Cauca, Spain, About 346; Served Under His Father In Britain, Germany, And Africa, And Won Fame As A General By His Exploits In Mcesia. On ...

The Stuart Family
Stuart Family, The. This House Derives Its Name From The Important Office Of Steward Of The Royal Household Of Scotland. The Name Is Often Written Stewart And Occasionally Steuart. The Form Of Stuart Was First Assumed When Queen Mary Went To France, And Was Adopted By All Her Descendants. The ...

The Trentino
Trentino, The, The Name Of That Part Of Tyrol Which Adjoined Italy Be Fore The World War. This Territory Constituted One Of The Claims For Which Italy Entered The World War On The Side Of The Allies, In 1915, And Was Immediately Occupied By The Italian Army On Beginning Operations ...