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Scilicet

ss, london, ward and county

SCILICET (Lat. acirc, to know, /tea, it is permitted ; you may know ; translated by to wit, in its old sense of to know). That is to say ; to wit ; namely.

It is a clause to usher in the sentence of another, to particularize that which was too general before, distribute what was too gross, or to explain what was doubtful and obscure. It neither increases nor diminishes the prem ises or habendwin, for it gives nothing of it self ; it may make a restriction when the preceding words may be restrained ; Hob. 171; 1 P. Wms. 18; Co. Litt. 180 b, n. 1.

When the scilicet is repugnant to the pre cedent matter, it is rejected: for example, when a declaration in trover states that the plaintiff on the third day of May was pos sessed of certain goods which on the fourth day of rMay came to the defendant's hands, who afterward, to wit, on the first day of May, converted them, the scilicet was re jected as surplusage ; Cro. Jac. 428. And see Haak v. Breidenbach, 6 Binn. (Pa.) 15; 3 Saund. 291, note 1.

Stating material and traversable matter under a scilicet will not avoid the conse quences of a variance ; 1 M'Cl. & Y. 277 ; 2 B. & P. 170, n. 2 ; Vail v. Lewis, 4 Johns. (N. Y.) 450, 4 Am. Dec. 300 ; nor will the mere omission of a scilicet render immaterial matter material ; 2 Saund. 206 a; even in a

criminal proceeding ; 2 Camp. 307, n. See 3 Maule & S. 173.

It is said to have been used interchange ably with 'videlicet. It came to be contract ed into ss. Its chief use was in connection with the venue of an action. Scilicet was used to particularize a general statement, thus: "London ss. In the Ward of Cheap," meant at London, but more particularly in the ward of Cheap. When, in 1706, it was enacted that the jury should no longer be summoned de vicineto, and the parish and ward were dropped from the venue, the pleaders held fast to the ss. (as "London ss.") though it had become meaningless. But the prevalence of county courts in America has brought back its real use. It should be written thus: Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, ss.

County of Philadelphia meaning: In the commonwealth of Pennsyl vania, but more particularly in the county of Philadelphia. See 25 Green Bag 59, by J. 0. Skinner.

The omission of "ss." in a legal document is not material so as to invalidate it ; Bab cock v. Kuntzsch, 85 Hun 33, 32 N. Y. Snpp. 587 ; McCord & Nave M. Co. v. Glenn, 6 Utah, 139, 21 Pac. 500.