Hanging Wallpaper

center, length, pattern, paper, lengths, ceiling, roll and breast

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The ceiling paper being of a geometrical pat tern, care must be taken to equalize the pat tern all around so as not to have a half-pattern against one side of the ceiling and a quarter or less on the other. It may not be possible to get the same pattern all around; but if the room is right-angled, the same pattern can be got length wise and in the width. If the room has an un equal side to it, get the three square sides right, and let the paper go where it will on the unequal side, or on the end where the chimney breast is.

Hanging Wallpaper

Let us assume that the room to be papered is oblong in shape (see Fig. 74). The window is in one of the longer sides; the work will therefore be done the short way of the ceiling, so that the joints run towards the light. No assistance will be needed in papering this ceiling. Measure the length with a straight-edge, and find the cen ter; fix the chalk line with a shoemaker's awl, and snap a line A B at right angles to the cor nice; do the same the other way, as C D, the two lines crossing in the center at E. Now arrange the plank and trestles, or steps, under the center line, in order that the line may be seen when the first length is being hung.

Measure the distance from the center E to the cornice at C or D; suppose it to be two lengths of the straight-edge; that will be four lengths, or 12 ft., for the whole width. Unroll a piece of paper on the board to measure the four lengths off, or select the principal pattern for the center, and measure two lengths either way from it; allow a few inches for cutting in by; find how many lengths are required from the center E to A one way, and E to B the other, and cut off. Have the paste fairly stiff and free from lumps; to remove any lumps there may be, strain through coarse canvas or a hair sieve. Only one length at a time can be pasted; too much soaking affects the luster.

In pasting this paper, place all the lengths in the center of the board, so that there is about in. of the board visible on either side; and, when pasting, take the edges of the paper to the edges of the board. Do not get the paste on the back of the next length before pasting it all over, for where it has been doubly pasted a well-de fined mark will be seen when dry. Begin past ing from the end and fold enough over to reach comfortably, so that when finished the length is folded in a series of short folds of 1 yd. or less each (see Fig. 75). Take a roll of paper or the straight-edge, and lay the folded length on it.

Take the wide roller (having previously covered it with clean flannel for this paper) and the length, and get up on the plank. Begin at the window side; undo the top fold (which, when undone, will be pasted side up, if it has been folded properly), and if 3 in. has been allowed for cutting in by, stick the end on the ceiling, so as to leave only iu. or 2 in. over. Roll on lightly with the one hand, and hold the remain der of the folds up to the ceiling with the other, the roll of paper being not necessarily true to the line—not close enough to obliterate it, anyhow. When the center E is reached, the pattern will be 1 in. or 2 in. beyond the center. Now place the pattern right, and roll on the other half C properly, and true to the line; then go to the other end, and gently pull the first half off again; then back to the center, and re-roll back to D; then cut in the ends. Proceed either way till the cornice is reached; then go hack to the center, and work the other way in the same manner. Of course, it will be possible to begin hanging from the ends after getting the first length right; put on the pieces on either side of the chimney breast, roll the joints carefully, and take care not to get any paste on the cornice.

If the breast is not in the center of the wall, it will be advisable, in the case of a large pat tern, to take the line from the middle of the breast, so that the pattern will be equal on both sides, for this is the part that catches the eye first in a ceiling. In an all-over or coral pattern, it would not be necessary to begin in the center; the worker could hang from one end and work right through.

Next comes the frieze. As there is a rail round this room, the frieze can be hung now; if there were none, the filling would have to be hung first. Never hang a frieze in short lengths; hang the whole length from angle to angle in one piece; nothing looks worse than joints in a frieze. Trim on the board the whole length of the piece, and roll up as you trim. Begin on the chimney breast; arrange so as to get the same pattern on both sides, and allow enough to go around into the corners on the side of the breast; paste and fold in short folds, and hang. Con tinue till the place is reached where it is intended to make a break. In this case, the frieze space not being cut into by anything, and the door be ing in the corner, the best place will be the angle over the door, as being the part least likely to be noticed.

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