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Soda

baking, milk and washing

SODA: in the form in which it is chiefly used for food purposes, is variously known as Bicarbonate of Soda or Sodium, Supercarbonate of Soda, Saleratus and Baking Soda. The prefix "Bi" in the first-named title stands for "two," meaning two equiva lents of carbon-dioxide to one of the base, which is soda. It is one of the chief ingre dients of all BAKING POWDERS (which see).

When employed in baking biscuits, etc., Baking Soda produces the carbon-dioxide, which is the active "raising" principle, by reaction in contact with the acid contained in the sour milk or buttermilk which accompanies its use. Its action as an ingredient of baking powder is identical, for it then reacts under similar conditions with similar result in contact with the acid which is a complementary component.

Baking Soda is a valuable ally to the housekeeper. A pinch of it stirred into milk that is to be boiled will keep it from curdling. A bit, the size of a pea, added to the tomato for Tomato Cream Soup will prevent the milk breaking when it goes in—and is a safeguard with all cream soups. Another piece, cooked with green vegetables,

will keep them a fresh color. A pinch in the water in which dry beans are soaked, will expedite the process wonderfully. Many other similar uses might be cited.

Baking Soda is generally obtained as a side product in the manufacture of Soda proper or Sal Soda, known in the average household as Washing Soda.

Washing Soda.

Among the various uses of Washing Soda—in sinks, etc.—is the service it renders in cleaning tin cooking vessels and utensils. They should be put in a wash boiler with plenty of water and a good supply of soda and allowed to boil for a few minutes—then remove the boiler from the stove, but permit the tins to remain in the solution for an hour or two. When rinsed and wiped, they will be bright and new looking. It is well to avoid as much as possible putting one's hands in the water, as it will quickly roughen the skin and nails.