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Lonchurus

vice-chancellor, boy, ingenious, told and astronomy

LONCHURUS, in natural history, a genus of fishes of the order Thoracici. Generic character : the head scaly ; ven tral fins separate ; the tail lanceolated. The bearded lonchurus is a native of Surinam, about twelve inches in length, has a slightly lengthened nose, two beards at the lower jaw, and the first ray of the ventral fins elongated into a bristle. Its colour is a ferruginous brown.

LONG (Rocart,) D. D. Master of Pem broke-hall in Cambridge, Lowndes's pro fessor of astronomy in that university, &c. was author of a well known and much approved treatise of astronomy, and the inventor of a remarkably curious astro nomical machine. This was a hollow sphere of eighteen feet diameter, in which more than thirty persons might sit conve niently. Withinside the surface, which represented the heavens, was painted the stars and constellations, with the zodiac, meridians, and axis parallel to the axis of the world, upon which it was easily turned round by a winch. He died December 16, 1770, at ninety-one years of age.

A few years before his death, Mr. Jones gave some anecdotes of Dr. Long, as fol lows : " He is now in the 88th year of his age, and for his years vigorous and ac tive. He was lately put in nomination for the office of vice-chancellor : he exe cuted that trust once before, I think in the year 1737. He is a very ingenious person, and sometimes very facetious. At the public commencement, in the year 1713, Dr. Greene (master of Bennet Col lege, and afterwards Bishop of Ely) being then vice-chancellor, Mr. Long was pitch

ed upon for the tripos performance: it was witty and humorous, and has passed through divers editions. Some that re membered the delivery of it, told me, that, in addressing the vice-chancellor, (whom the university wags usually styled Miss Greene) the tripos orator, being a native of Norfolk, and assuming the Nor folk dialect, instead of saying, Domine vice-cancellarie,' archly pronounced the words thus, Domina vice-cancellaria which occasioned a general smile in that great auditory. His friend, the late Mr. Boufoy, of Ripton, told me this little inci dent: That be and Dr. Long, walking together in Cambridge, in a dusky even. ins, and coming to a short post fixed in the pavement, which Mr. Boufoy, in the midst of chat and inattention, took to be a boy standing in his way, he said, in a hurry, Get out of my way, boy.' That boy, sir,' said the Doctor, very calmly and slyly, is a post-boy, who turns out of his way for nobody.' I could recollect several other ingenious repartees, if there were occasion. One thing is remarkable, he never was a hale and hearty man, al ways of a tender and delicate constitution, yet took great care of it ; his common drink water ; he always dines with the fellows in the hall. Of late years he has left off eating flesh-meats ; in the room thereof puddings, &c. sometimes a glass or two of wine."