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Chamber's Encyclopedia, Volume 4

Dayaks
Dayaks, See Bouseo, And Brooke, Sir James. Day, Or Dave, Stephen, 1611-68; B. England; The First Printer In The New Eng Land Colonies. Ile Came Over In 1638, And Began Printing At Cambrithre The Next Year, Producing First The Freeman's Oath, But What Freemen Were Meant 'does Not Appear. Then ...

De Clinton
Clinton, De Wrrt (ante), 1769-1828; B. N. Y., Was The Son Of James Clinton And Mary De Witt, And Grandson Of Charles The Immigrant From Ireland. His Paternal Ances • Tors, Although Long Resident In Ireland, Were Of 'english Origin, And His Mother Was Of Dutch-french Biotic'. Ile Was Educated ...

De Foe
De Foe, Dantnt,, Was B. In London, 1661, And Was The Son Of James Foe, A Butcher. The Prefix De Was Not Added To The Family Name Of Foe By. Our Author Until He Had Reached Manhood. De F., Whose Father Was A Dissenter, Was Educated At A Dissenting Academy ...

De La
De La Itame', Louisa (ouida, Pseud.) B. 1840, In Bury St. Edmunds. England, Of French Descent On The Father's Side. When A Child She Was Taken To London, And At A Precocious Age Began To Write For Periodicals. While Yet Under Age, She Commenced Her First Novel In Colburn's New ...

De La Beche
De La Beche, Sir Henry Thomas, A Well-known Geologist, Was B. Near London In 1796. He Was Educated At The Military School At Great Marlow, And Entered The Army In 1814. Three Years After, Lie Became A Fellow- Of The Geological Society, Of Which Inc Was Afterwards Made Secretary. And ...

De Loutherbourg
De Loutherbourg, Plum. James, 1740-1812; Of A Polish Family, But B. At Strasburg, Where He Was Naturalized, Educated In The University, And Intended For The Ministry. His Inclinations, However, Led Him To Painting, And He Studied In Paris Under Van Loo. He Speedily Made A Name And Won High Rank. ...

De Soto
De Soto, Ferturnanno, 1496-1542; One Of The Early Spanish Explorers Of North America. Ire Distinguished Himself When Young In Literary Studies And Athletic Exer Cises. In 1519, He Accompanied Pedrasias Davila, His Patron, To The Isthmus Of Darien, And Was A Most Daring And Independent Opponent Of The Tyrannical Rule ...

Deaconesses
Deaconesses (aneilice, Ministne, Viduce, S'irgines, Episeopce, Presbyters'), Female Ministers Or Servants Of The Church Or Christian Society In The Time Of The Apostles (rom. Xvi. 1). They Co-operated With The Deacons, Showed The Women Their Place In The Church-assem Blies, Assisted At The Baptism Of Persons Of Their Own Sex, ...

Deacons
Deacons, Literally Servants, Meant, In Apostolic Times, Properly Those Officers Of A Congregation Or Church That Had The Charge Of Collecting And The Alms, And Of Taking Care Of The Poor And The Sick. The Office, Therefore, Was Nota Clerical One, The Term Deacon Or Servant May Have Been At ...

Dead Letter Office
Dead-letter Office, A Division In The United States Post-office Department At Washington For The Reception, Care, And Disposition Of Letters And Packages (except Newspapers) That Are Uncalled For Or Cannot Be Delivered To The Parties To Whom They Are Directed At The Various Post-offices Of The Country. A Statement Of ...

Dead Sea
Dead Sea (anc. Locus Asphaltites), Called By The Arabs Bahr Loot, Or Sea Of Lot, Is Situated In The S.c. Of Palestine, In Lat. 31° 10' To 31° 47' N., And Occupies A Central Posi Tion Between Long 35° And 36° East. It Is About 40 M. Long, With An ...

Deaf And Diinib
Deaf And Diinib. Persons Who Are Born Deaf, Or Who Lose Their Hearing At A Very Early Age, Are Dumb Also; Hence The Compound Term Deaf-and-dumb. But The Primary Defect Is Deafness; Dumbness Is Only The Consequence Of It. Children Ordinarily Hear Sounds, And Then Learn To Imitate Them; That ...

Deaf And Dumb
Deaf And Dumb (ante). The Organization Of Institutions To Educate The Deaf And Dumb In The United States Dates From The Early Part Of This Century. An Essay On Teaching The Deaf To Speak, By Dr. W. Thornton, Of Philadelphia, Was Published In 1793, And In 1811, A Grandson Of ...

Deafness
Deafness May Be Complete Or Partial, May Affect Both Ears Or Only One, May Date From Birth, Be Permanent Or Only Temporary, And Is But Too Often One Of The Distressing Symptoms Of Advancing Age. The Causes Of Deafness Are Numerous. On Glancing At The Article Auditory Nerve, The Reader ...

Deal
Deal, A Municipal Borough, And Member Of The Parliamentary Borough Of Sand. With, Maritime T. And Sea-bathing Place, In The C. Of Kent, On A Bold Open Beach, Near The S. Extremity Of The Downs, Between North And South Foreland, 18 M. E S E. Of Can Terbury, And 8 ...

Dean
Dean. The Institution Of Deaneries, As Of Other Ecclesiastical Offices Of Dignity, Bears A Resemblance To The Methods Of Ancient Civil Government. Thus, For The Preserva Tion Of Civil Order, Every Hundred Consisted Of Ten Districts, Called Tithings, And In Every Tithing Was A Constable Or Civil Dean. In Conformity ...

Dean Of Tiie Chapel
Dean Of Tiie Chapel Royal (scotland), An Office Held By Six (formerly Three) Clergymen Of The Established Church, To Which They Are Appointed By The Crown. The Benefice Of The Chapel Royal, Which Was Instituted By James Was Richly Endowed, But It Has Been Disputed Whether The Revenues Now Enjoyed ...

Death
Death. It Is One Of The Fundamental Doctrines Of Physiology, That Every Part Of The Organism Has Its Own Definite Term Of Vitality, And That There Is A Continuous Succession Of The Destruction Of Old Cells And The Formation Of New Ones In All Tissues, And Especially In Those In ...

Death Watch
Death-watch, A Ticking Sound Produced By Certain Insects, Inmates Of Human Dwellings, And Which, Being Most Readily Heard In That Stillness Which Attends Times Of Sickness And Anxiety, Has Become Associated With Superstitious Notions And Fears, Being Regarded As Indicative Of An Approaching Death In A House. The Most Common ...

Deaths Head Moth
Death's-head Moth, .acherontia Atropos, A Species Of Hawk-moth (q.v.), Or Lepi• Dopterous Insect Of The Family Sphingidte, Not Uncommon In Some Parts Of England And Of The Continent Of Europe, And Very Widely Distributed Over The World, Being Found In Africa, The Mauritius, And The East Indies. It Measures Almost ...

Debenture
Debenture, There Are Two Kinds Of Documents To Which This Term Is Applied, Which May Be Described Separately. Excise General D.—this Is A Certificate Authorizing The Exporter Of Certain Classes Of Goods To Receive A Drawback Equal In Amount To The Excise Duties Which Had Been Paid On Them. The ...

Debt
Debt, That Which One Person Owes To Another, Or The Duty Which, As Responsible Beings, All Owe Towards God. Life Is Figuratively Spoken Of As A Loan, And The Act Of Dying Is Called " Paying The Debt Of Nature." More Commonly, However, The Term D. Is Limited To• Money ...

Debts Recovery Of
Debts. Recovery Of (ante), In The United States Ordinarily By An Action At Law. Such Action Lies Where Even The Sum Due Is Certain Or Ascertained In Such A Manner As To Be Readily Reduced To A Certainty, Without Regard To The Manner In Which The Obligation Was Incurred Or ...

Decalog1te
Decalog1te (gr. Delcalogos, " Ten Discourses"), Is The Term Usuallv Applied By The Greek Fathers To The Law Of The Two "tables Of Testimony" Given By To Moses On Mount Sinai. These Tables Were Made Of Stone, And The Commandments Inscribed Thereon Are Said To Have Been " Written By ...

Decemviri
Decem'viri. The Most Famous Body Known Under This Title Were The Ten Persons Who Were Appointed As A Sort Of Legislative Committee, To Draw Up A Code Of Laws At Rome. The Groundwork On Which The D. Proceeded, Was The Information Which Had Been Previously Collected By Three Commissioners Who ...

Decimal Fractions
Decimal Fractions (lat. Damn, Ten) Are Such As Have For Their Denominator Any Of The Numbers 10, 100, 1000, Etc., I.e., Any Power Of 10. See Fraction. Thus, Are, Decimal Fractions. In Writing Such Fractions, The Denominator Is Omitted, And The Above Stand Thus: 0.7, Or .7, .23, .019. That ...

Decimal System
Decimal System. This Name Is Applied To Any System Of Weights, Measures, Money, Etc., In Which The Standard Unit Is Divided Into Tenths, Hundredths, Etc., For The Denominations Below It, And Multiplied By 10, 100, Etc., For Those Above It. The Nature Of This Method Of Division Will Be Best ...

Declamation
Declamation (lat. Declamare, To Speak Loudly, Hence To Exercise One's Self In Rhetorical Delivery), Is The Art Of Speaking According To Rules, Whereby The Sense Of The Words, As Well As The Feeling And Sentiment, Is Naturally And Characteristically Repre Sented. Recitation, Therefore, Whether Spoken Or Sung, Is Subject To ...

Declaration Ln Criminal Proceedings
Declaration Ln Criminal Proceedings. In Scotland, The Statement Made By The Prisoner Before The Magistrate (see Statement) Is Called His Declaration. It Is The Duty Of The Magistrate To Take This D. Immediately On The Prisoner Being Brought To Him —that Is To Say, If He Is In His Sober ...

Declension
Declension, A Grammatical Term Applied To The System Of Modifications Called Ewes, Which Nouns, Pronouns, And Adjectives Undergo In Many Languages. How The Words Declension (lat. Derlinatio, A Declining, Or Leaning Away) And Case (lat. Easue, Fall) Came To Be Applied To This Species Of Inflection, Has Never Been Made ...

Declination Needle
Declination Needle. When A Magnetic Needle Is Suspended Or Made To Rest On A Point So As To Be Free To Move In A Horizontal Plane, It Finds Its Position Of Rest In A Line Joining Two Fixed Points On The Horizon; And When Made To Leave That Position, After ...

Decorated Style
Decorated Style Of Gothic Architecture. During The Reigns Of The First Three Edwards, From The Latter Part Of The 13th Till Nearly The End Of The 14th C., Gothic Archi Tecture May Be Said To Have Been In Full Bloom In England. It Attained Perfection Some What Earlier In France ...

Decoying
Decoying Ore Children. The Crime Of Stealing Human Creatures, The Plagittm Of The Roman Law And Of The Law Of Scotland, Is Severely Punished By The Legislation Of Every Civilized Country. In Countries Where Slavery Does Not Exist, The Theft Of A Human Adult Is A Crime Which Can Scarcely ...

Dedaliis
Deda'liis, According To The Greek Myths, Was Sprung From The Old Athenian Race Of Kings, The Erechtheidw, And Was A Contemporary Of Theseus And Minos. He Was Famous For His Ability As An Artist And Mechanician. Among The Numberless Works Which He Is Said To Have Executed, May Be Mentioned ...

Deduction
Deduction Is A Particular Kind Of Reasoning Or Inference. In Ordinary Language, To Deduce Means To Trace One Thing To Another As Its Cause, To Show That One Proposition Follows From Some Other Proposition Or Propositions. In Logic, Its Signification Is More Definite. It Is Usual To Oppose Deduction To ...

Deed Of Defeasance
Defea'sance, Deed Of (in English Law). An Instrument Which Defeats The Force Or Operation Of Some Other Deed Or Estate; And That Which In The Same Deed Is Called A Condition, In A Separate Deed Is Called A Defeasance. Defeasance Is Of Two Sorts, One Applicable To Freehold Estates, The ...

Deep River
Deep River, A Tributary Of Cape Fear River,. North Carolina, Rising In Guilford Co., And Running Through Randolph And Chatham Counties To Join The Haw. Its Length Is About 120 M., And It Is Navigable As Far As The Coal-mines. The Coal-beds In Its Valley Have Been Long Known, But ...

Dees Cui
Cui,'dees, Or Keldees, (celt. Ceile-de; Lat. Colidei, Culdei, Calledei, Keldei, Keledei), The Name Given In The British Islands To An Ancient Order Of Ecclesiastics. The Word Seems To Be Of Celtic Origin, And In The Irish Language Signifies An " Attendant Of God." Giraldus Cambrensis, Writing Towards The End Of ...

Deffand
Deffand, Mania De Vichy-citamrond, Marquise Du, 1074780; A Leader In The Fashionable Literary Society Of Paris During The Greater Part Of The 18th Century. She Was Born Of A Noble Family In Burgundy, And Educated In A Convent In Paris, And Soon Developed The Cynical And Skeptical Turn Of Mind ...

Definition
Definition Is The Explanation Or Statement Of The Meaning Of A Word, Viz., Either The Meaning It Usually Bears, Or That Which The Speaker Or Writer, For The Particular Purposes Of His Discourse, Intends To Annex To It. To Give Merely Another Synonymous Name—to Say, For Instance, That " Man ...

Deformities
Deformities. Varieties Of Form Which Mar The External Appearance, May Be Con Genital Or Acquired, According As They Occur Before Or After Birth. The Former Class Were Considered By The Ancients To Carry Some Important Meaning In Their Mysterious Shapes, And To Show The Anger Of The Gods; Hence, They ...

Degerando
Degerando, Jos. Marie, Baron, Author And Philanthropist, Was B. 29th Feb., 1772, At Lyons, France. His Family Was Originally From Italy. He Studied At The Col Lege Of The Oratoire Of Lyons, With A View To Becoming A Priest; But The Persecutions Of The Revolutionists Altered His Plans. In 1797, ...

Degree
Degree, In A College Or University (fr. Degre, From Lat. Grades, A Step), Is A Recog Nition Of The Student Having Made A Certain Step In Advance, And Having Attained, As It Were, To A Certain Resting-place In His Academical Career. The Evidence Of A D. Is Usually Called A ...

Dei Gratia
De'i Gra'tia (lat. " By The Favor Of God ") Is A Formula Taken From Several Apos Tolical Expressions In The New Testament. It Is Believed To Have Been First Formally Used By The Bishops At The Council Of Ephesus, 931 Am. Afterwards, It Came To Be Appended By Archbishops, ...

Deiicalion
Deiica'lion, According To The Greek Myth, Was A Son Of Prometheus, Grandson Of Iapetus, And Husband Of Pyrrha. When Zeus Had Resolved To Destroy The Race Of Men By A Flood, D. Built And Provisioned, By The Advice Of His Father, An Ark Or Ship, Which He Entered Along With ...

Deios
Deios (called Also In Ancient Times Asteria, Ortygia, Cynthus, Etc.), An Island In The Grecian Archipelago, The Smallest Of The Cyclades, Is Situated Between The Islands Rhe Neia And Mykonus, In Lat. About 37° 23' A., And Long. 25° 17' East. According To The Mythological Account, It Was At First ...

Delaware
Delaware, A Term Of Various Application In The States, Indicates A River, A Bay, And A State, To Say Nothing Of Counties And Less Important Localities.-1. The River D. Rises In New York, On The W. Slope Of The Catskill Mountains, Commonly Reckonod A Portion Of The Appalachians Or Alleghanics; ...

Delaware
Delaware (ante), The "diamond State," Popularly So-called From Its Size And Shape, Was Named After Lord De La Warr, An Early Colonial Governor Of Virginia, Who Sailed Up The Bay In 1610, Though Henry Hudson Had Preceded Him By Nearly A Year. In 1630, The Dutch Planted A Small Colony ...

Delaware Indians Indians
Delaware Indians (indians, Ante), A Tribe Of American Indians Once Very Important, Dwelling In The Region Of The Delaware River, In Pennsylvania And New York. They Were Called Lenno Lenape, From " Lenappi," A Term For Men In General, Applied By Themselves To Themselves. (delaware Is Not An Indian Word, ...

Delhi
Delhi (ancient Name, Indraprestiut, Or Indoput; Mohammedan Name, Shahjehana Bad), A Celebrated City Of Northern India, In 28° 39' N. Lat., And 77° 18' C. Long., Capital Of The Province And District •of The Same Name, Is Situated On An Offset Of The River Jumna, At About A Mile From ...

Delirium
Delirium (from Lat. Dc/iro, I Am Furious), A State Of Deranged Mind, In Which The Intellect And The Judgment Are Perverted Or Lost, While The Imagination And The Passions Are Often Excited, Or At Least Left Without Control. The Result Is An Incoherent Or Totally Disordered Course Of Action And ...

Delirium Tremens
Delirium Tremens Is The Term Given To A Disease Originating From The Abuse Of Alcoholic Stimulants By Those Of A Nervous And Irritable Temperament, Characterized By A Combination Of Delirium With Muscular Tremors. The Tremors Are General, But Chiefly Of The Hands, And Of The Tongue When Protruded; And The ...

Delphi
'delphi (now Castes), An Ancient T. Of Phocis, Greece, Celebrated Chiefly For Its Famous Oracle Of Apollo, Was Situated About 8 M. N. Of An Indentation In The North Ern Shore Of The Gulf Of Lepanto (corinthian Gulf), At The Southern Base Of Parnassus, In Sat. 38° 27' N., And ...

Demand And Supply
Demand And Supply. The Nature And Influence Of The Law Or Agency So Desig Nated By Political Economists Have Been The Subject Of Considerable Dispute. It Has Sometimes Been Maintained As A Ruling Principle, That The Demand For Anything Creates The Supply. This Has Been Denied, However; And It Has ...

Demavend
Demavend, Morwr, An Extinct Volcano Of Persia. It Forms The Loftiest Peak Of The Elburz Chain; Which Separates The Low Shores Of The Caspian Sea From The High Table-land Of Persia. Although No Longer Subject To Eruptions, D. Bears Traces Of Its Having Been An Active Volcano Within The Most ...

Dembinski
Dembinski, Iiitixi Icrt, A Polish Gen., Best Known In Britain Through His Connection With The Hungarian Revolution, Was B. In The Palatinate Of Cracow, 16th Jan., 1791, Entered The Polish Army In 1809, Took Part Iu The Invasion Of Russia By The French In 1812, And Was Made Capt. By ...

Demeiriiis
Demeiriiis, The Assumed Name Of Four Different Persons Who Figure Prominently In Russian History Between The Years 1603-13. In 15s4, Ivan The " Terrible" Died, Leaving Two Sons, Feodor And Demetrius, The Former Of Whom Ascended The Throne, But Proved A Weak Ruler, And Was Completely Under The Control Of ...

Demetriiis
Deme'triiis, Pliale'reus, So Named From The Attic Demos Of Phalerus, A Seaport Of Athens, Where Lie Was Born About 345 N.c., 'mis Distinguished As An Orator And Politician. Though Descended From A Family Possessing Neither Rank Nor Property, Yet By The Resolute And Persevering Exercise Of His Abilities, He Rose ...

Demidoff
Demidoff, A Russian Family Who In Russia Occupy A Position As Capitalists Similar To That Held By The Rothschilds Elsewhere, And Who Are Not More Celebrated For Their Wealth Than They Are For Their Beneficenee.—nikita D., The Founder Of The Family, Was A Serf Iu The Time Of Peter The ...

Democracy
Democracy (gr. The Rule Of The People). It Is Interesting To Trace The Progress Of This Idea, Which Now Plays So Important A Part. In Greece, Whence We Derive The Name, It Was Understood To Mean A Commonwealth So Constituted That The Power Was Exercised By The Body Of The ...

Democritus
Democritus, An Illustrious Greek Philosopher, Was B. At Abdera, In Thrace, About 470 Or 460 B.c. Of His Life, Little Is Known. The Statement That He Was First Inspired With A Desire For Philosophic Knowledge By Certain Magi And Chaldeans Whom Xerxes Had Left At Abdera, On His Grecian Expedition, ...

Demoniacs
Demo'niacs (damoniaci, Obsessi, Or, With Reference To The Supposed Influence Of The Moon, Lunatic?), The Name Given By The Jews To Persons Afflicted With Epilepsy, Hypo Chondria, Or Insanity, Diseases Of Frequent Occurrence In The East. The Name Originated In The Belief, That Persons So Afflicted Had Been Taken Possession ...

Demons
Demons (gr. Daimlines, Lat. Genii) Are, According To Superstitious Belief, Spirits Which Exercise An Influence On The Fortunes Of Men. Their Dignity And Character Have Both Changed Greatly In The Course Of Time. Homer Calls The Gods Demons, And Daimoniakos Is With Him Equivalent To Divine. Hesiod Affirms That There ...

Demosthenes
Demosthenes, The Greatest Orator Of Greece, And Indeed Of The Ancient World, Was A Native Of Athens. The Date Of His Birth Is Doubtful. Fynes Clinton Assigns It To The Year 382 B.c.; Thirlwall And Other Good Authorities, To The Year 385 U.c. His Father, A Wealthy Manufacturerer, Died Early, ...

Dempster
Dempster, Timmas, A Professor Famous For His Learning, And A Miscellaneous And Voluminous Writer, Was Born At Muiresk, In Aberdeenshire, About The Year 1839. What The Rank Or Condition Of His Family Was, Is Unknown; We Know, However, That He Studied At Cambridge. And That When He Went To France, ...

Demurrage
Demurrage, In The Law-merchant, Is An Allowance Made To The Master Or Owners Of A Ship, By The Freighter, When She Is Detained In Port By The Latter Beyond The Specified Time Of Sailing, For His Own Convenience. A Certain Number Of Days, Called Running Or Working Days, Are Allowed ...

Demurrer
Demurrer, In English Law, Is An Exception By One Party In A Suit Or Action To The Sufficiency In Point Of Law Of The Case Of The Opposite Party. At Common Late, Each Party Might Demur To The Sufficiency Of The Pleading Of The Opposite Party. •the Party Whose Pleading ...

Denbighshire
Denbighshire, A Co. Of North Wales, Ou The Irish Sea, And Between The Dee And The Conway. It Is 41 In. Long, With An Average Breadth Of 17; Contains 603 Sq.m., Has 8 In. Of Coast, And Is The Sixth In Size Of The Welsh Counties. The Surface Is Partly ...

Denis Diderot
Diderot, Denis, A Celebrated French Encyclopedist And Philosophical Writer, Was Born At Langres, In Champagne, 5th Oct., 1713. He Was Educated For The Church At The College Of His Native Town, And Subsequently At That Of D'harcourt, Paris; But Dis Liking The Clerical Office, And After Having Made A Trial ...

Denmark
Denmark (dan. Danmark), Capital, Copenhagen, The Smallest Of The Three Scandi Navian Kingdoms, Is Situated Between 54° And 57° 44' 50° N. Lat., And 8° 5' And 12° 45' E. Long., Excepting The Small Island Of Bornholm In The Baltic, About 90 In. E. Of See Land, Which Lies In ...

Denon
Denon, Dommottri Vivant, Baron, Was H. At Chillons-sur-sa6ne, Jan. 4, 1747. At An Early Period, He Went To Paris, To Study Law, But Quickly Betook Himself To The Fine Arts, And Acquired A High Reputation As An Amateur And Art Critic. During A Residence In Southern Italy, He Spent Much ...

Dentistry
Dentistry, The Art Of The Dentist, Or That Of Treating Disease In The Teeth (dental Surgery), And Of Replacing These Organs When Lost (mechanical Dentistry). 1. Dental Surge?. Y. —the Disorders To Which The Teeth Are Liable Are Those Arising From Defective Development, Such As Imperfections In Form Or Structure, ...

Denudation
Denudation Is The Removal Of Solid Matter By Water In Motion, Whether Of Rivers Or Of The Waves And Currents Of The Sea, And The Consequent Laying Bare Of Some Inferior Rock. The Rate Of Abrasion Depends Upon The Velocity Of The Current, And The Nature Of The Solid Materials ...

Deposit
Deposit Was A Real Contract Of The Civil Or Roman Law. It Was The Simplest Of All Contracts, And Consisted Merely In The Delivery Of An Article By One Person To Another, To Be Kept Without Remuneration, And To Be Restored In Specie As Soon As The Depositor Should Require.—/nst. ...

Depression Or Dip Of
Depression Or Dip Of The Horizon Is The Angle Through Which The Sea-horizon Ap Pears Depressed In Consequence Of The Elevation Of The Spectator. Let A Be A Point On The Surface Of The Earth, B A Point Situated In A Vertical Line From A. Let Bh Be A Tangent ...

Derajat
Derajat', The Fluvial Portion Of Daman (q.v.), Itself A Comparatively Narrow Strip In The Punjab, Between The Suliman Mountains And The Indus, And Which, When Duly Irrigated, Is Singularly Fertile. D. Is So Called From Dera, A Camp, A Common Element In The Names Of Its Towns—dera Been Punah,. Dera ...

Derbyshire
Derbyshire, An Inland Co. Of England, Lying Between Yorkshire On The N. And Leicestershire On The South. Its Shape Is Triangular; The Greatest Length From N. To S. Being 56 M.; Greatest Breadth, 34; Area, 1030 Sq. Miles. The North-west Is Occupied By The S. End Of The Pennine Chain, ...

Derelict
Derelict, A Term In English Law, Signifying Anything Forsaken Or Left, Or Willfully Cast Away. Derelict Lands, If Suddenly Left By The Sea, Belong To The Crown; But If The Sea Has Receded Gradually And Imperceptibly, The Gain Will Go To The Owner Of The Adja Cent Lands. In Order ...

Derrick
Derrick, A Mechanical Contrivance Used For The Same Purposes As The Crane, But Recently So Improved In Size, Strength, And Mechanism, As To Be Able Not Only To Raise A Body Of 1000 Tons In Weight, But To Transport It From One Place To Another. The Fel Lowing Description Of ...

Derry
Derry, A Parliamentary And Municipal Borough And Manufacturing Town, The Capital Of Derbyshire, In The S. Part Of The Co., In The Wide And Fertile Valley Of The Derwent—thence Navigable To The Treut—at The Junction Of The Main Branches Of The Midland Railway, 132 M. N.n.w. Of London, And 35 ...

Dervish
Dervish Is A Persian Word Signifying Poor, Corresponding To The Arabic Fakir (q.v.). It Designates, In Mohammedan Countries, A Class Of Persons Resembling In Many Respects The Monks Of Christendom. The Dervishes Are Divided Into Many Different Brotherhoods And Orders. They Live Mostly In Well-endowed Convents, Called Tekkije Or Changah, ...

Descartes
Descartes, (latinized Into Renatus Cartesius), The Name Of One Of The Reformers Of Philosophy, Was B. Mar. 31,1596, At La Haye, In Touraine. He Was Sent At The Age Of 8 Years To The Jesuit College At La Fleche, Where He Soon Became Distin Guished For His Keenness Of Intellect, ...