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Chamber's Encyclopedia, Volume 4

Desert
Desert (ckstrtus, Solitary), A Term Used To Denote Any Portion Of The Earth's Surface Which, From Its Barrenness, As In The Case Of The Arid Places Of Northern Africa And Arabia, Or From Its Rank Exuberance, As In The Case Of The Silvas Of South America, Is Unfitted To Be ...

Desertion
Desertion From The Public Service Of The Country/ Is The Crime Of A Man Ab Sconding, During The Period For Which He Is Enlisted, From The Service Of The Army Or Navy. This Crime Was, By Certain Old Statutes, Made Punishable With Death; But Now The Punishment For Desertion Is ...

Desmidiee
Desmidiee, According To The Prevalent Opinion Of Naturalists, A Tribe Or Group Of Slice, And As Such Ranked By Sonic Botanists Among Diatomacece (q.v.); Whilst Other Naturalists Regard Them As Belonging To The Animal Rather Than To The Vegetable King Dom, Some Also Esteeming Them To Be Vegetable Who Maintain ...

Desuetude
Desuetude, A Technical Term In The Law Of Scotland, Signifying That Repeal Or Revocation Of A Legal Which Is Effected, Not By A Subsequent Enactment In A Contrary Sense, But By The Establishment Of A Contrary Use, Sanctioned By The Lapse Of Time And The Consent Of The Community. The ...

Detroit
Detroit, The Chief City Of Michigan, The Oldest City By Far In The W. Of The United States, And Older Than Either Baltimore Or Philadelphia On The Seaboard, Was Founded By The French Of Canada In 1670, As An Outpost For The Prosecution Of The Fur Trade, On The Right ...

Detroit_2
Detroit (ante), The Most Populous City Of Michigan, And The Capital Of Wayne Co., On The Iv. Bank Of The Detroit River, About 18 M. From Lake Erie And 7 M. From Lake St. Clair. The Site Is Sufficiently Elevated Above The River To Afford Excellent Facilities For Drainage, Which ...

Dettingen
Dettingen, A Village Of Bavaria, Circle Of Lower Franconia, On The Right Bank Of The Maine; Noted As The Scene Of A Battle During The Austrian Wars Of Succession. This Conflict, In Which George Ii. Of England Headed The Army Of The Allies, While The Duke De Noailles Acted As ...

Deuteronomy
Deuteronomy (ante) Is The English Title Of The Fifth Book Of Moses, Derived From The Greek Translation, And Signifying "repetition Of The Law." It Well Expresses The General Scope Of The Book, Which Is A Review Of The 40 Years In The Wilderness, Including The Laws Which Had Been Given. ...

Development Of Doctrine
Development Of Doctrine Signifies The Modifying Process Through Which Chris Tian Or Philosophical Opinion Passes In Its Transmission From Age To Age. At First Com Paratively Simple In Its Expression, Doctrine Has A Tendency To Become More Complicated And Technical In Structure As Argument Is Exercised Upon It, And The ...

Development Of The
Development Of The En'illei0. Harvey Laid Down The Principle, In Opposition To The Views Of Those Who Believed In The Doctrine Of Spontaneous Generation, That All Animals Are Produced From Eggs (mane Drum Ex Ore); And Move Recent Researches Have Fully Confirmed This View, If We Arc Allowed To Accept ...

Deviation Of The Plumb Line
Deviation Of The Plumb-line, An Effect Observed Near Cliffs Or Mountains, Seems To Show That The Attraction Of Masses Of Earth Deflect A Perpendicular Line. Similar Effects Have Been Observed On Plains, Whence It Is Argued That There Must Be Hollows Underneath, Or Masses Of Earth Of Different Degrees Of ...

Devil Fish
Devil-fish, A Name Given By Fishermen Along The Southern Atlantic And Gulf Coasts Of The United -states To A Cartilaginous Fish Of The Ray Family, Ceratopterus Vain: Pipits, Mitch. The Outline Of The Fish Is Nearly An !softies Triangle, The Apex At The Tail,. The Altitude Of The Triangle, Or ...

Devise
Devise, In English Law, The Conveyance Of Land By Will. As Personal Property Or Chattels Is Said To Be Bequeathed, So Lands Are Said To Be Devised. It Is Said, Co. Litt. 111 B. N. 1, That, Under The Saxon And Danish Rule In England, The Owners Of Land Were ...

Devonian System Devonian Formation
Devonian Formation, Devonian System (ante). At The Beginning Of The Devonian Period The Dry Land Of North America Was Confined To The Present Territory Of Eastern Canada And New England. The Alleghany Mountains Were Sketched In A Series Of Islands And Coral Reefs Which Made A Barrier Between The Ocean ...

Devonshire
Devonshire, A Maritime County, In The S.w. Peninsula Of England, Between The Bristol And English Channels. Greatest Length, 71 M.; Greatest Breadth, 68; Average, 46; Area, 2,590 Sq.m., Three Fourths Being In Pasture Or Arable. The N. Coast, 60 M. Long, Is Mostly Steep And Rocky; The Chief Indentation Being ...

Diabetes
Diabetes (gr. Literally A Syphon, From Diabaino, I Go Or Flow Through), A Disorder Of The General System, Of Which The Principal Symptom Is A Very Much Increased Flow Of Urine. Diabetes Is Of Two Distinct Kinds. The One, Diabetes Insipidus, Is A Mere Exaggera Tion Of The Water-excreting Function ...

Diagram
Diagram, A Figure So Drawn That Its Geometrical Relations May Illustrate The Rela Tions Between Other Quantities. The Area Of A Rectangle Is The Product Of Its Length And Breadth; The Diagram Of The Rectangle Becomes The Visible Symbol, Corresponding To The Equation A = Bl ; By Analogy, The ...

Dial And Dialing
Dial And Dialing. A Is An Instrument For Measuring Time By Means Of The Motion Of The Sun's Shadow Cast By A Stile Erected On Its Surface. It Is An Instru Ment Of Very Great Antiquity, The Earliest Mention Of It Being In Isaiah Xxxviii. 8; And Before Clocks And ...

Dialect
Dialect. In Speaking Of A People Having Essentially All One Language, But Living Extended Over An Extensive Territory, The Name Of Dialects Is Given To Those Varieties Or Peculiar Forms Which That Language Assumes Among The Various Tribes Or Other Local Divisions Of The People. It Is Clear That The ...

Diamagnetism
Diamagnetism. The Fact That Iron Is Attracted By The Magnet, Has Been Known From Very Remote Times; That Bismuth Exhibits A Repulsive Action Towards The Magnetic Needle, Has Been Now Known For Nearly 100 Years. Dr. Faraday Was The First (1845) To Show That All Bodies Are More Or Less ...

Diamond
Diamond (corrupted From Gr. Adamant, Untamable, Refractory), The Most Valuable Of Precious Stones After The Ruby, And The Hardest Of All Known Substances. It Consists Of Carbon (q.v.), A Simple Or Elementary Substance, Crystallized, And In Its Greatest Purity. Diamonds Are Commonly Colorless And Clear Like Water ; Although Sometimes, ...

Diana
Diana, A Roman Goddess, Corresponding In Most Of Her Attributes To The Grecian Artemis. According To The Myths, She Was The Daughter Of Jupiter And Latona, And The Twin-sister Of Apollo. She Was Born, Along With Her Brother, On Mt. Cynthus, In The Isle Of Delos, Which Till Then Had ...

Diapason Regulator
Diapason Regulator. The French, Who Give The Name Of Diapason To The Tuning Fork, Have Lately Made Attempts To Use That Instrument In Connection With Clockwork, Partly As A Means Of Counting Very Small Intervals Of Time. ' M. Duhamel Made An Arrangement In Which A Cylinder, By Means Of ...

Diaphragm
Diaphragm (gr. Diaphragma, A Partition). This Is The Name Applied In Anatomy To Designate The Transverse Muscle Which, In Man And The Mammalia Generally, Separates The Cavity Of The Thorax Or Chest From That Of The Abdomen Or Belly. In Form, It Is Nearly Circular; It Is Fleshy At Its ...

Diarrhea
Diarrhea (gr. Dia, Through, And Rheti, I Flow), A Disease Or Rather A Tribe Of Dis Eases, Characterized By An Increase In The Discharges From The Bowels, Which Are Usually Unduly Liquid, Sometimes Overcharged With Bile, And Sometimes The Contrary. Diarrhea Has Many Varieties And Many Causes; But The Whole ...

Diathermancy
Dia.thermancy, A Word Used To Express That Quality In Bodies By Which Rays Of Heat Are Allowed To Pass Through Them; In Other Words, It May Be Called " Trans Parency" To Heat. More Correctly Speaking. D. Has The Same Relation To Radiant Heat That Transparency Has To Light. Bodies ...

Diaz
Diaz, Baittolommeo, It Portuguese Navigator Of Noble Birth, Who Flourished During The Latter Half Of The 15th Century. Ills Residence At The Court Of King John Ii. Brought Him Into Contact With Many Scientific Men, Among Others The German Cosmographer Behaim (q.v.). D. Took A Great Interest In Geographical Discovery, ...

Dibble And Dibbling
Dibble And Dibbling, The Common Garden Dibble Is An Implement Too Well Known To Require Any Lengthened Description. A Round Piece Of Wood, About An Inch And A Half In Diameter, Sharpened At The Point, Is The Most Simple And Common Form. To Allow It To Be More Easily Pressed ...

Dicast
Di'cast, A Body Of 6,000 Athenian Citizens Chosen Annually By Lot From The Whole People, Except Slaves, To Assist In The Administration Of Justice. They Were Divided Into 10 Sections, Each Section Having The Powers And Performing The Duties Of A Court Of Justice. The Evidence In A Cause Was ...

Dicecious
Dice'cious (gr. Dis, Twice; And &don, A Habitation), In Botany, A Term Applied Either To Plants Or Flowers, When Not Only The Flowers But The Individual Plants Are Unisexual— I.e.. When Male And Female Flowers Are Produced Upon Separate Plants. D. Plants Form A Distinct Class In The Linotean Sexual ...

Dick Bequest
Dick Bequest', The Name Given To A Fund Bequeathed By James Dick Of Finsbury Square, London, For The Benefit Of The Parochial School-masters Of Moray, Banff, And Aberdeen. Mr. Dick Was B. At Forres, Morayshire, In Nov., 1743. Having Entered Mercantile Life In The West Indies At The Age Of ...

Dickens
Dickens, Cilutles, Novelist And Humorist, Was B. At Landport, In Hampshire, In Feb., 1812. His Father, Mr. John Dickens, Was Employed For Some Years In The Navy Pay Department, But At The Conclusion Of The War With France Was Pensioned, And Became A Parliamentary Reporter. In This Pursuit His Son ...

Dictator
Dictator, In The Earliest Times, Was The Name Of The Highest Magistrate Of The Latin Confederation, And In Sonic Of The Latin Towns The Title Was Continued Long After These Towns Were Subjected To The Dominion Of Rome. In The Roman Republic The D. Was An Extraordinary Magistrate, Irresponsible And ...

Dictionary
Dictionary, Is Merely The English Form Of Dictionariura, A Word Not To Be Found In Classical Latin. Though Of Frequent Use In That Called Monkish Or Medheval. A D. Is, As Every One Knows, A Book, But, In The Widest Sense Of The Word, Its Contents Admit Of No More ...

Didot
Didot, The Name Of A Celebrated Family Of French Printers And Publishers. D., Fu_kxgois, The First Of The Family That Attained Eminence, Was B. In 1689, And D. In 1757. His Principal Professional Achievement Was The Publication Of The Voyages Of His Friend The Abbe Prevost, A Work In 20 ...

Dieppe
Dieppe, A Seaport T. Of France, In The Department Of Seine-inferieure, At The Mouth Of The River Armies, On The English Channel, Lat. 49° 55', Long. 1° 5' E. D. Is Situated Between Two High Ranges Of Chalk Cliffs, Is Regularly Built, With Tolerably Wide, Clean Streets Running Parallel To ...

Dies Ire
Dies Ire, The Name Generally Given (from The Opening Words) To The Famous Medix Val Hymn On The Last Judgment. On Account Of The Solemn Grandeur Of The Ideas Which It Brings Before The Mind, As Well As The Deep And Trembling Emotions It Is Fitted To Exite, It Soon ...

Diet
Diet. Man And Animals Generally Require That Their Food Should Be Of Such A Nature As To Compensate For The Wear And Tear Of The Tissues Which Is Perpetually Going On, And As At The Same Time To Keep Up The Animal Heat At Its Proper Standard. Various Classifi Cations ...

Difference Differences Calculusof
Difference ; Differences; Calculus Of Finite Differences. The Word Dif Ference Means Usually The Excess Of One Quantity Over Another Of The Same Kind, And This Is Its Meaning In Arithmetic. In The Higher Branches Of Mathematics, However, It Has A Peculiar Meaning, Which We Shall Briefly Explain. When We ...

Differences
Differences, In Heraldry, Though Often, Or Indeed Generally, Confounded With Marks Of Cadency (q.v.), Have, In Strict Usage, A Totally Different Function—the Former Being Employed To Distinguish Brothers And Their Descendants After The Death Of The Father, The Latter Whilst He Is Still Alive. Differences In This Limited Sense May ...

Diffusion
Diffusion, The Gradual Dispersion Of Particles Of One Liquid Or Gas Among Those Of Another—or Of The Particles Of A Solid In A Liquid Holding It In Solution. It Is Of The Greatest Importance In Terrestrial Physics, Being The Cause Of The Uniform Composition Of The Atmosphere At All Elevations, ...

Digby
Digby, Sir Kenelme, The Son Of Sir Everard Digby, Noted As One Of The Gunpowder Plot Conspirators, Was B. In 1603, Three Years Before The Execution Of His Father. He Was Brought Up In The Protestant Faith, And At The Age Of 15 Was Entered At Gloucester Ball, Oxford. After ...

Digitalis
Digitalis, A Genus Of Plants Of The Natural Order Serophulariaecte, Natives Chiefly Of The S. Of Europe And Temperate Parts Of Asia. One Only, The Common Foxglove (d. Purpurea), Is A Native Of Britain, And Is Very Abundant In Some Parts Of The Country, Its Large Purple Flowers Often Giving ...

Dijon
Dijon, A T. Of France, In The Department Of Cote D'or, Formerly Capital Of The Old Duchy Of Burgundy, In Lat. 47° 20' A., And Long. 5° 2' E., And About 195 M. S.e. Of Paris By Railway. D. Occupies A Most Delightful Situation In A Fertile Plain On The ...

Dilettanti Society
Dilettanti Society, A Body Of Noblemen And Gentlemen By Whose Exertions The Study Of Antique Art In England Has Been Largely Promoted. The Society Was Founded In 1734, And Held Its Meetings At The Thatched House Tavern In St. James' Street. It Was In Its Beginnings Simply An Amateur Club, ...

Diligence
Diligence, The Name Given In France To A Public Conveyance Of The Nature Of A Stage-coach. It Is A Huge, Strong-built Vehicle, With Four Broad Wheels, Weighing About 5 Tons, And Is Drawn By 4 Stout Horses, At The Rate Of About 6 Miles An Hour. It Consists Of 3 ...

Diminutives
Diminutives Are Forms Of Words, Chiefly Of Substantives, In Which The Primitive Notion Has Become Lessened Or Diminished, As Hillock=a Little With Littleness Is Associated The Idea Of Neatness, And Also Of Needing Protection; Hence D. Are Used As Terms Of Endearment; Sometimes They Imply Contempt. There Is Perhaps No ...

Dimorphous
Dimorphous (gr. Dis, Twice; Morphe, Shape Or Form) Is The Term Applied To A Sub Stance When It Exhibits The Property Of Crystallizing In Two Distinct Forms Or Systems. See Crystallography. Thus, Sulphur, As Found Crystallized Naturally, And As Obtained By The Spontaneous Evaporation Of Its Solution In Bisulphuret Of ...

Dinocrates
Dinoc'rates, A Greek Architect Of The Time Of Alexander The Great. He Applied To The Courtiers For An Introduction To The Macedonian King, But Was Put Off From Time To Time With Vain Promises. Impatient At The Delay, He Is Said To Have Laid Aside His Usual Dress, Besmeared His ...

Dinornis
Dinor'nis (gr. Deinos, Terrible Or Wonderful, And Ornis, A Bird), A Genus Of Large Birds Of The Tribe Breripennes (q.v.), Of *melt No Species Is Now Known To Exist, But Of Which The Bones Have Been Found In New Zealand, In The Most Recent Deposits, In The Sand Of The ...

Dion1ea
Dion1ea, A Very Curious And Interesting Genus Of Plants Of The Natural Order Drose Raem, Having A 5-partite Calyx, 5 Petals, 10 To 20 Stamens, And One Style, With 5 Closely United Stigmata. Only One Species Is Known, D. Muacipula, Sometimes Called Venus's Fly-trap And The Carolina Catchfly Plant. It ...

Dioptrics
Diop'trics Is That Branch Of Geometrical Optics (see Optics) Which Treats Of Tho Transmission Of Rays Of Light From One Medium Into Another, Differing In Kind. It Consists Of The Results Of The Application Of Geometry To Ascertain In Particular Cases The Action Of What Are Called The Laws Of ...

Diplomacy
Diplomacy, The Art Of Managing The Intercourse And Adjusting The Relations Of Foreign States, By Means Of *ambassadors, Envoys Extraordinary, Consuls, Etc. The Principles And Rules Of D. Are Embodied Partly In Those International Customs And Usages Which Constitute What May Be Called Common, And In Those Treaties Which May ...

Diplomacy_2
Diplomacy (ante), The Science Which Deals With The Relations And Interests Of Nations In Respect To One Another. Diplomatic Agents Arc Of The Following Grades: Ambassadors, Ministers Penipotentiary, Charges D'affaires, Envoys, And Consuls. In The United States, These Agents Are Appointed By The President, With The Advice And Consent Of ...

Dipper
Dipper, Cinclus, A Genus Of Birds Of The Thrush Family (merulida), Distinguished From The Other Birds Of That Family By An Almost Straight, Compressed, Sharp-pointed Bill, And Still More By Their Manners And Habits. They Frequent Clear Pebbly Streams And Lakes, Feeding Chiefly On Mollusks And On Aquatic Insects And ...

Dipping Needle
Dipping-needle. If A Magnetic Needle Be Supported So As To He Free To Move Ver Tically, It Does Not At Most Places On The Earth's Surface Rest In A Horizontal Position, But Inclines More Or Less From It. If The Vertical Plane In Which The Needle Moves Is The Magnetic ...

Dipsomania
Dipsomania (gr. Dipsa, Thirst, And Mania, Madness, Or Eager Desire) Is A Term Intended, Whether Correctly Or Not, To Denote A Condition In Which Certain Individuals Manifest An Irresistible Craving For Alcoholic Drinks. Oinomania (gr. Oinos, Wine), Used By German Writers; And The English Drinking Insanity, Are Also Intended To ...

Diptera
Diptera (gr. Two-winged), An Order Of Insects, Which Received From Aristotle The Name It Still Bears. Its Distinguishing Characters Are So Obvious That It Has Been Acknowledged, With Little Change Of Its Limits, By Almost All Naturalists. Fly Is A Popular Name Very Generally Applied To Dipterous Insects, And Often ...

Director
Director, One Of A Number Of Persons Appointed To Conduct The Affairs Of Joint Stock Undertakings, Such As Banks, Railways, Water And Gas Companies, Fire And Life Assurance Companies, And Various Kinds Of Manufacturing And Trading Concerns. The Office Of A D. Is In All Cases One Of Less Or ...

Directory
Directory. On The Death Of Robespierre, In 1794, A Reaction Commenced In The Convention Itself, As Well As Throughout All France, Against The Sanguinary Excesses Of The Terrorists. Ultimately A New Constitution—that Of The Year 3 (1795)—gave Birth To A New Government, Composed Of A Legislative Body Divided Into Two ...

Dirschati
.dir'schati, A T. In Prussia, In The Government Of Dantzic, On The Vistula, A Railway Junction, 20 M. S.e. Of Dantzie; Pop. '75, 9,727. There Is Considerable Trade And Industrial Activity; But The Chief Claim Of The Place To Attention Is The Lattice-work Iron Bridge Over The River, Built In ...

Disciples Of Christ
Disciples Of Christ, A Denomination Of Baptists, Organized 1627, Who Are Often Spoken Of As Camphellites, But Prefer To Call Themselves Tin: Oriuncit Of Christ. In 1808, Thomas Campbell, A Minister Of The " Seceders," Emigrated From Ireland To The Western Part Of Pennsylvania, And Was Followed, The Next Year, ...

Discount
Discount, The Difference Between A Sum Of Money Due At A Future Period And Its Present Value; Or The Deduction Made From The Amount Of A Debt That Is Paid Before It Is Due. It Is Usually Ascertained—in The Case Of Bills Of Exchange, Promissory Notes, And The Like—by Subtracting ...

Disease
Disease, According To Its Literal Construction, A State Of Disease, Or Absence Of The Condition Of Health, In Which All The Faculties And Organs Of The Body And Mind Work Together Harmoniously And Without Sensible Disturbance. In A Strictly Scientific Sense, There May Be Disease Without Pain Or Uneasiness In ...

Diseases Of Plants
Diseases Of Plants Form A Subject Of Study Interesting Equally In Its Scientific And Its Economic Or Practical Relations, But In Regard To The Most Important Parts Of Which Much Obscurity And Uncertainty Still Exists. Enough, Indeed, Is Known To Show That, As Might Have Been Expected, An Analogy Subsists ...

Dishonor Of A Bill
Dishonor Of A Bill. When The Drawee, Or Person On Whom A Bill Is Drawn, Declines To Accept It Or To Pay It, He Is Said To Dishonor It. The Act Of Drawing Or Of Indorsing A Bill Implies An Obligation To Pay It In The Last Instance, And The ...

Disinfectants
Disinfectants Are A Class Of Substances Which Have The Power Of Absorbing Or Destroying The Effluvia Or Fetid Odors Evolved From Putrescent Matter, And The Mias Matic Matter Generated In Low, Marshy, And Ill-drained Localities. The Principal Sub Stances Capable Of Being•uked For This Purpose Are Chlorine, Bleaching-powder, Carbolic Acid, ...

Disinfectants_2
Disinfectants (ante). The Subject Of Disinfectants Is Not Yet Perfectly Under Stood, And There Are Many Unsettled Notions Regarding It. There Has Lately Been Con Siderable Skepticism In Regard To The Disinfeeting Powers Of Chlorine And Carbolic Acid, And With Apparently Good Reason. Doubtless Too Much Reliance Has Been Placed ...

Dislocation
Dislocation Consists In The Displacement Of One Bone From Another With Which It Forms A Joint (put Out Of Joint Being The Popular Expression). Dislocations Are Generally The Result Of Sudden Accident, But May Be The Result Of Disease, Or May Be Congenital. The Displacement May Be Partial Or Complete; ...

Dispensation
Dispensation, A License Granted By The Pope For That Which Is Ordinarily Prohib Ited. The Nature And Limits Of The Dispensing Power Have Been The Subject Of Much Discussion Not Only In Controversy With Protestants, But Among Roman Catholics Them Selves. It Is Held By The Extreme Advocates Of Papal ...

Disposition
Disposition, In The Law Of Scotland, Is A Deed Of Conveyance, Applicable Either To Heritable Or Movable Property, But Most Frequently Used For The Purpose Of Transferring The Former From The Seller To The Buyer. There Is Another Well-known Form Of The Deed, The Object Of Which Is To Settle ...

Distribution Of Diseases
Diseases, Distribution Of. It Is Generally Known That The Different Regions Of The Earth Are Subject To Diseases Deriving Their Character From Local Circumstances And Conditions, Such As Latitude, Climate, The Chemical Quality Of The Soil, Elevation Of The Land Above The Sea-level, Variation Of Temperature, Water Distribution, Character Of ...

Divination By Cup
Cup, Divination By, A Mode Of Foretelling Events, Practiced By The Ancient Egyp Tians, And Still Prevailing In Some Of The Rural Districts Of England And Scotland. One Of The Eastern Methods Consisted In Throwing Small Pieces Of Gold Or Silver Leaf Into A C. Of Water, In Which Also ...

Dumec Z1n
Du:mec Z1n, A Large Straggling T. Of Eastern Hungary, Situated In The Midst Of An Extensive Plain, About 120 M. E. Of Pesth. Like Many Of The Hungarian Towns, D. Is A Mere Collection Of Villages, United On No Particular Plan. The Houses For The Most Part Are Mean Structures ...

Edward Daniel Clarke
Clarke, Edward Daniel, Known As A Traveler And Author, Was B. At Willingdon, In Sussex, In 1769. He Studied At Cambridge. And From 1790 To 1799 Was Employed As Tutor And Traveling-companion In Several Noblemen's Families, And Made The Tour Of Great Britain, France, Italy, Switzerland, And Germany. In 1799, ...

Edward Geoffrey Smitr Stanley Derby
Derby, Edward Geoffrey Smitr-stanley, 14th Earl Of, Was B. 1799, At Knowsley Lancashire. He Was Educated At Eton And Christ-church, Where, In 1819, Lie The Latin Verse Prize (subject; Syracuse). He Was Elected Member Of Parliament For Stockbridge In 1820; In 1825, He Married The Second Daughter Of The First ...

Edward Hyde Clarendon
Clarendon, Edward Hyde, Earl Of, An English Historian And Statesman, Son Of A Private Gentleman, Was B. At Dinton, Wiltshire, 18th Feb.. 1608, And Educated At Oxford. He Studied Law Under His Uncle, Nicholas Hyde, Chief-justice Of The King's Bench; Was A Member Of The Long Parliament, And For Some ...

Epistle To The Colossians
Colossians, Epistle To The, Is Proved By External Testimony And Internal Evidence To Be A Genuine Production Of The Apostle Paul, And As Such Has Been Univer Sally Acknowledged Except By A Few Modern Critics Who Oppose But Cannot Overturn The General Judgment. From The Epistle Itself It Is Plain ...

Epistles To The Corinthians
Corinthians, Epistles To The (ante). From A Passage In What Is Now Named The First Epistle—" I Wrote To You In The Epistle"—many Have Inferred That An Earlier Letter Had Been Sent By The Apostle To The Church Of Corinth. The Weight Of Evidence, However, Is Against That Opinion. The ...

Felicien David
David, Felicien, A French Composer, Was B. Stb Mar , 1810, At Cadenet, In The Department Of Vaucluse. He Was At First A Chorister In The Cathedral Of Aix, And At The Age Of 20 Entered The Paris Conservatoire. Ile Threw Himself Earnestly Into The Social Speculations Of His Day; ...

Ferdinand Victor Eugene Delacroix
Delacroix, Ferdinand Victor Eugene, A Modern French Painter, Chief Of The "romantic School," Was B. At Charenton-saint-maurice, Near Paris, 26th April, 1799. At The Age Of 18, Lie Entered The Atelier Of The Artist Pierre Guerin. In 1822, He Exhibited His First Work, "dante And Virgil." It Attracted Much Attention. ...

Flavius Cresconius Corippus
Corip'pus, Flavius Cresconius, A Native Of Africa, Supposed To Have Lived In The 6th C.; Author Of A Panegyric On Justin The Younger, Byzantine Emperor From 565 To 578 A.d. Corippus Was Also The Author Of Johannis, A Poem Celebrating The Exploits Of A Proconsul Of That Name In Africa ...

Francesco Saverio Clavigero
Clavige'ro, Francesco Saverio, A Mexican Historian, Was B. In Vera Cruz, South America. About 1720, And Entering The Order Of The Jesuits, Was Educated As An Ecclesi Astic. Sent As A Missionary Among The Indians In Various Parts Of Mexico, He Lived Among Them For 36 Years, And Made Himself ...

Franz Dear
Dear, Franz, Hungarian Politician, Was B. In 1803 At Kehida, In The Hungarian Co. Of Zala. Having Studied Law At Raab, He Began To Practice As An Advocate In His Native County, And Soon Became Noted For His Eloquence And Enlightened Patriotism. Elected In 1832, To The National Diet, Lie, ...

George Combe
Combe, George, A Well-known Phrenologist And Moral Philosopher, Was B. Oct. 21, 1788, In Edinburgh, Where He Was Educated. Entering The Legal Profession, He Became A Writer To The Signet In 1812, And Continued To Practice Until 1837, When He Resolved To Devote Himself To Scientific Pursuits, For Which He ...

George Crabbe
Crabbe, George, A Late English Popular Poet, Was B. At Aldborough, In Suffolk, On The 24th Dec., 1754. His Father Was A Warehouse Keeper, And Collector Of The Salt-duties At Aldborough, And Exerted Himself To Secure For His Son A Superior Education. C. Early Exhibited A Passion For All Kinds ...

George Cruikshank
Cruikshank, George, One Of The Most Gifted Of English Pictorial Satirists, Was B. In London, Sept. 27, 1792. His Father Was A Native Of Aberdeenshire, And The Son Of A Person Who Had Fought For Prince Charles Stuart At Culloden. C. At First Thought Of The Stage As A Profession; ...