Tile Implements

ball, stroke, umpire, player, balls, replaced, croquet and roquet

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25. Foul Strokes.—Is a player make a foul stroke, he loses the remainder of his turn, and any point or roquet made by such stroke does not count. Balls moved by a foul stroke are to remain where they lie, or be replaced at the option of the adversary. If the foul be made when taking croquet, and the adversary elect to have the balls replaced, they must be replaced in contact as they stood when the croquet was taken. The fol lowing are foul strokes:—(a) to strike with the mallet another ball instead of or besides one's own, in making the stroke; (b) to spoon—i.e., to push a ball without an audible knock; (c) to strike a ball twice in the same stroke; (d) to touch, stop, or divert the course of a ball when in play and rolling, whether this be done by the striker or his partner; (e) to allow a ball to touch the mallet in rebounding from a peg or wire; (f) to move a ball which lies close to a peg or wire by striking the peg or wire; (g) to press a ball round a peg or wire (crushing stroke); (h) to play a stroke after roquet without taking croquet; (i) to fail to move both balls in taking croquet; (/0 to croquet a ball which the striker is not entitled to croquet.

26. Balls touched by Advcrsary.—Should a ball when rolling, except it be in hand, be touched, stopped, or diverted from its course by an adversary, the striker may elect whether he will take the stroke again, or whether the ball shall remain where it stopped, or be placed where, in the judgment of the umpire, it would have rolled to.

27. Balls stopped or diverted by Umpire.—Should a ball be stopped or diverted from its course by an umpire, he is to place it where he considers it would have rolled to.

28. Playing out of Turn, or with theWrong a player play out of turn, or with the wrong ball, the remainder of the turn is lost, and any point or roquet made after the mistake. The balls remain where they lie when the penalty 13 claimed, or are replaced as they were before the last stroke was made, at the option of the adversary. But if the adverse side play without claiming the penalty, the turn holds good, and any point or points made after the mistake, are scored to the ball by which they have been made (that is, the ball is deemed to be for the point next in order to the last point made in the turn), except when the adversary's ball has been played with, in which case the points are scored to the ball which ought to have been played with. If more than one ball be played with during the turn, all points made during the turn, whether before or after the mistake, are scored to the ball last played with. Whether the penalty be claimed or not, the adversary may follow with either ball of his own side.

29. Playing for Wrong Point.—If a player make a wrong point it does not count, and therefore (unless he have, by the same stroke, taken croquet, or made a roquet), all subsequent strokes are in error, the remainder of the turn is lost, and any point or roquet made after the mistake. The balls remain where they lie when the penalty is claimed, or are replaced as they were before the last stroke was made, at the option of the adver sary. But if the player make another point, or the adverse side play, before the penalty is claimed, the turn holds good: and the player who made the mistake is deemed to be for the point next in order to that which he last made.

30. Information as to player is entitled to be informed which is the next point of any ball.

31. State of Game if disputed.—When clips are used, their position, in case of dispute, shall be conclusive as to the position of the balls in the game.

32. Wires knocked out of a player, in trying to run his hoop, knock a wire of that hoop out of the ground with his ball, the hoop does not count. The ball must be replaced, and the stroke taken again; but if by the same stroke a roquet be made, the striker may elect whether he will claim the roquet or have the balls replaced.

33. Pegs or Hoops not .upright.—Any player may set upright a peg or hoop, except the one next in order, and that must not be altered except by the umpire.

34. Ball lying in a Hole or on Bad Ground. —A ball lying in a hole or on bad ground may he moved with the sanction of the umpire. The ball must be put back—i.e., away from the object aimed at—and so as not to alter the line of aim.

35. Umpires.—An umpire shall not give his opinion, or notice any error that may be made, unless appealed to by one of the players. The decision of an umpire, when appealed to, shall be final. The duties of an'umpire are—(a) to decide matters in dis pute during the game, if appealed to; (b) to keep the score, and if asked by a player, to disclose the state of it; (c) to move the clips, or to see that they are properly moved; (d) to replace balls sent off the ground, or to see that they are properly replaced; (e) to adjust hoops or pegs not upright, or to see that they are properly adjusted.

36. Absence of there is no umpire present, permission to move a ball, or to set up a peg or hoop, or other indulgence for which an umpire would be appealed to, must be asked of the other side.

37. Appeal to an umpire be unable to decide any point at issue, lie may appeal to the referee, whose decision shall be final; but no player may appeal to the referee from the decision of an umpire.

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