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Prints

print, frame and blotting-paper

PRINTS Photographic prints embossed in low relief. Platinotype prints are the best for this purpose, but others may be used if hardened in a to per cent, solution of formaline. A folding wooden frame A is required large enough to take an unmounted print. The opening in the frames must be as large as the actual portrait, but smaller than the complete print. Profile portraits give the best results. On a piece of cardboard the same size as the print, is traced the outline of the head and bust ; to do this, trace the head on a piece of tracing paper and transfer to the cardboard by means of carbon (manifolding) paper. Cut out the space inside the outline, and the card will then form a mask, which should exactly correspond with the outline of the portrait. The print is now mounted on thick blotting-paper with starch or other slow-drying adhesive, and is placed under heavy pressure for ten or fifteen minutes, after which time it should feel damp and pliant. Some workers wet the blotting-paper to ensure this. The cut-out

mask is next placed over the face of the print in register, and the whole put into the frame and clamped. The arrangement is shown by B, the bust being seen through the hole in the card. By means of a bone or ivory paper-knife, or the handle of a tooth-brush, carefully apply pres sure from the blotting-paper side and raise or emboss those parts desired, holding the frame in the left hand and working with the right, the face of the print being nearest the operator. First of all work the tool all over the back of the portrait with a circling motion, and then apply more pressure to the nose, cheeks, dress, etc., which need to be given in prominence. The work must be done very gently, as the blotting paper is damp, and the tool may go through the picture and spoil it. Leave in the frame until dry and mount on stiff card by the edges only. (For imitation bas-reliefs, see " Plastic Photographs.")