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Quoits

quoit, game and hob

QUOITS, kwoits, a game somewhat resem bling the throwing of the discus among the ancients; only the discus was flat, while the quoit is ring-shaped. (See Discus). The quoits are made of metal, usually iron, and are com paratively thick at the inner edge of the ring, but sharp enough at the outer edge to stick in soft clay when properly thrown. In size they vary from eight to nine and one-quarter inches. The game is played on a ground from 18 to 24 yards in length, at each end of which a pin called a hob is fixed in the ground to serve for a mark. The object of the game is to throw the quoits from one end of the round to the other so as to make them stick in the ground as near the hob as possible. The best shot, called a ringer, is when the quoit surrounds the hob. The players are divided into sides and each player has two quoits, which he de livers in succession. The winning side counts one for each quoit that it has nearer the hob than the nearest of the losing side and if it has a ringer it counts two for it. The rules as to the size of the quoit, the distance between the hobs and other particulars vary with dif ferent players. In the United States the game

is often played with cast-off horseshoes. The pine is popular in England, Scotland and Canada, and in the two latter countries is the summer sport of the curling clubs. In the United States, under the auspices of the Grand National Curling Club of America, there is an annual contest for the Bell quoit medal, given by David Bell of Buffalo, N. Y., in 1868. Con sult Spalding's Athletic Library,

The game is popular in England, Scotland and Canada, and in the two latter countries is the summer sport of the curling dubs. In the United States, under the auspices of the Grand National Curling Club of America, there is an annual contest for the Bell quoit medal, given by David Bell of Buffalo, N. Y., in 1868. Con sult riding's Athletic Library,