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Encyclopedia Americana, Volume 23

Puvis De Chavannes
Puvis De Chavannes, Pierre, Pe-ir Pii6ves De Sha-van, French Painter: B. Lyons, 14 Dec. 1824; D. Paris, 25 Oct. 1898. He Sprung From An Old Burgundian Family Of Strong Catholic Traditions. His Father Was An Engi Neer And He Himself Was Destined To The Same Career, But An Intervening Illness ...

Pygmies
Pygmies, The Name Given By The Ancients To A Race Of Dwarfish Men Reported As Existing In Various Parts Of The World. Homer (ii. Iii, 6) Fixes The Habitat Of The Pygmies In The Far South Land Whither The Cranes Migrate At The Approach Of Winter; After Homer The Battles ...

Pylos
Pylos. See Navarino. Pym, Pim, John, English Statesman: B. Brymore, Somersetshire, 1584; D. London, 8 Dec. 1643. He Was Educated At Oxford, And In 1602 Entered The Middle Temple, But Was Never Called To The Bar. He Became Member Of Parliament For Caine In 1614, But From 1625 Sat For ...

Pynchon
Pynchon, William, American Colonist And Religious Writer: B. Springfield, Essex, England, 1590; D. Wraysbury, England, 29 Oct. 1662. He Was A Man Of Education, One Of The Grantees Of The Massachusetts Charter And Came To America With Gov. John Winthrop In 1630. He Held Various Offices In The Colony, From ...

Pyramid
Pyramid, In Architecture, A Structure Of Masonry Generally Having A Recangular Base And Four Triangular Sides Terminating In A Point. According To Herodonis The Egyptians Con Sidered The Pyramidal Form As An Emblem Of Human Life; The Broad Base Was Significant Of The Beginning And Its Termination In A Point ...

Pyrenees
Pyrenees, Piec-nea, A Lofty Mountain Chain Forming The Boundary Between France And Spain. Its Length, From Cape Creux, North Of The Gulf Of. Rosas, To The Point Of Near Fuenterrabia,is Nearly 270 Miles; And The I Area Of Its Slopes Is About 21,000 Square .miles, The Chain Is Continued Across ...

Pyrography
Pyrography, From Tr Vp, Fire And To Write, Literally To Write By Fire. A Method Of Making Impressions On Wood, Leather, Etc., By Means Of Heated Metal Tools Or Burnt Sticks. The Art Was Early Practised By The Egyptians Who Used Crude Iron Bars That Had Been Pre Viously Heated ...

Pyroligneous Acid
Pyroligneous Acid, An Impure, Di Lute Form Of Acetic Add Obtained By The Dry Distillation Of Wood. The Foliaceous Trees, Espe Cially The Beech,• Or The Oak And Birch, Which Latter Having Been Deprived Of Their Bark Are Better Adapted For Its Manufacture Than The Conifers. The Dry Distillation Of ...

Pyrometer
Pyrometer, An Instrument For Measur Ing Temperatures Higher Than The Boiling-point Of Mercury (350° C.). Regnault And Other Careful Experimenters Employed The Expansion Of Air And Vapors In Measuring High Tempera Tures. These Pyrometers Can Only Be Used In A Laboratory; For Use In A Manufactory Less Ac Curate Methods ...

Pyrotechnics
Pyrotechnics, The Art Or Business Of Manufacturing Or Displaying Fireworks. The Common Ingredients Are Nitre, Sulphur And Charcoal, Together With Filings Of Iron, Steel, Copper, Zinc And Resin, Camphor, Lycopodium, Etc. Gunpowder Is Used Either In Grain, Half Crushed, Or Finely Ground, According To The De Sired Effect. The Proportions ...

Pyrrho
Pyrrho, Pir'6, Greek Philosopher: B. Elis, About 365 Ex.; D. About 270 S.c. He Was A Pttpil Of The Democritean Philosopher Anaxar Chus Of Abdera, Whom He Accompanied To India In The Train Of Alexander The Great. During This Journey He Became Acquainted With The Doc Trines Of The Brahmans, ...

Pyrrhus
Pyrrhus, Pielis, Greek Military Leader, King Of Epirus: B. About 318 A.c.; D. Argos, 27 Ac. He Was The Son Of Feacides, Who Traced His Descent From Pyrrhus, Son Of Achilles. He Spent An Eventful Youth, Regained The Throne From Which His Father Had Been Deposed, And Was Himself Expelled ...

Pythagoras
Pythagoras, Pi-thilg'6-ras, Greek Losopher: B. Samos, About 582 Ac.; D. About 507. His Father, Mnesarchos, Was A Merchant (prob Ably Of Tyre Or Some Other Phcenician City) Who Traded With Samos, Where Lie Received The Rights Of Citizenship, And Settled With His Family. The Biography Of Pythagoras Is Mingled With ...

Pythagoreanism
Pythagoreanism, The Philosophical Doctrine Of The Pythagoreans, Or Followers Of Pythagoras (q.v.). The System Of The Pytha Goreans Was Comprehensive And Included A Theory Of Being; That Is, A Religious Cult; •met Aphysic.; A Cosmological Theory, And A Mathe-. Maticai Theory. Pythagorean Cult.— The Lieved In Tmmortality And The Transmigration ...

Python
Python, A Serpent Of The Subfamily Pythottintr Of The Boa Family. Pythons Differ Little From Boas (see Boin.t.;), But, Except A Small, Aberrant Species In Mexico, Are Found In Africa, India And Eastward To Australia. They Rival The Boas (q.v.) In Size And Strength And Have Similar Habits, Hanging Motionless ...

Pythonomorpha
Pythonomorpha, A Suborder Of Fos Sil Marine Reptiles Whose Remains Are Found In Cretaceous Rocks Of Europe, The Americas, New Zealand And South Africa. There Are About 120 Vertebrae In The Vertebral Column. The Skull Was Long And Much Resembled That Of The Lizard. The Two Pairs Of Limbs Were ...

Pyxie
Pyxie. Thepyxie, Or Flowering Moss (pyxidanthera Barbidata), Is One Of The Most Beautiful And Early-flowering Plants Of The Moist, Sandy, Pine-barren Regions Of New Jer Sey And North Carolina. It Is Found Only In Certain Localities Even In This Restricted District, But Is Abundant In Its Chosen Haunts, Blooming In ...

Quadrature Of The Circle
Quadrature Of The Circle. The Problem Involved In The Quadrature Of The Circle Requires The Determination Of The Length Of A Straight Line Such That The Square Con Structed Thereon Shall Have An Area Equal To That Of A Given Circle. It Can Be Shown In A Variety Of Ways ...

Quagga
Quagga, Kwig'4, A Species Of The Horse (equus Quagga), Nearly Allied To The Zebras, Formerly Found On The Plains Of Southern Africa, But Now Quite Extinct. It Was Striped Like The Zebra, But Did Not Possess Bands On The Limbs. The Color Was Dark Brown On The Head, Neck And ...

Quaglio
Quaglio, Kwa'1e-6, Name Of A Family Of Painters, Originally Belonging To Laino, Lago 'maggiore, Italy, But Afterward Dwellers In Mu Nich. The Most Eminent Among Them, Domenico (b. Munich, 1 Jan. 1786; D. Hobensehsvangau, 9 April 1837), Was .for 11 Years Decorative Painter For The Munich Theatre. He Subse Quently ...

Quail
Quail, One Of Several Partridges (q.v.); In The Eastern United States The Bob-white (colinas Virginianus) And On The Pacific Coast Partridges Of Other Genera. The Eastern Bob White Requires No Description Beyond A State Ment Of The Differences Between The Sexes. Be Sides Being Larger, The Male Has The Superciliary ...

Quana
Quana, Parker, Comanche Chief : B. About 1845; D. 1911; The Most Influential Leader 'among The Three Confederated Tribes Of Kiowa, Comanche And Apache In Southwestern Okla Homa. He Was The Son Of Nokoni, The Principal Chief Of The Comanche, And Cynthia Parker, A White Captive. Qua= Became Prominent In ...

Quantification Of The Predi
Quantification Of The Predi Cate, Supplying To The Predicate In A Logical Proposition A Word, As Or Tall, * Or Proposition Etc., To Indicate Whether The Whole Of It Or Only A Part Agrees With Or Differs- From The Subject. In The Proposition Tall Metals Are Elements' The Subject Is ...

Quarantine
Quarantine A Stated Period (for Merly 40 Days) During Which A Ship Coming From A Port Suspected Of Contagion, Or Having A Contagious Sickness On Board, Is Forbidden In Tercourse With The Place At Which It Arrives. Quarantine Was' First Introduced At Venice In The 14th Century, Is Now Required ...

Quarrying
Quarrying. Although There Are At This Time In The United States About 3,000 Quarries In Operation, With An Annual Product Valued At Above $75,000,000, The Quarrying Industry Has Not Kept Pace With Modern Tendency And Prog Ress Toward Cheaper Production. In Building Operations Revolutionary Changes Have Come About In The ...

Quartermaster Corps
Quartermaster Corps. In 1912 The Quartermaster Corps Of The United States Army Was Formed By The Fusion Of The Old Quartermaster's, Subsistence And Pay Depart Ments, All Of Which Date Back In Some Form Or Other To The First Two Decades Of The 19th Cen Tury. The Resulting Organization Is ...

Quartz
Quartz, The Name Given The Native Oxide Of Silicon, Siol. It Is A Widely Distributed Min Eral Occurring Not Only In Veins And Segregated Masses, But As A Common Constituent Of Igneous Rocks. Detrital Form Sands, And When Cemented, Sandstones And Quartzites. Owing To Differences In Color End- Its Use ...

Quasi Contract
Quasi-contract. A Quasi-contract — Often Called A Constructive Contract — Is One Founded Solely On An Obligation Of Law And Not Upon The Intention Or Consent Of The Parties. Such Contracts Are Imposed By Law On The Theory That They Are Dictated By Reason And Justice. Quasi-contracts Are Usually Founded ...

Quaternions
Quaternions. Fundamental Prin Ciples.— A Quaternion, Or Of Four,* Is A Quadrinomial Of The Form W + Xi -i- Yj Sk, In Which W, X, Y, X Are Numbers, And 1, 1, J, K Are Four Independent Units, Any Three Of Which May Be Interpreted Geometrically As A Set Of ...

Quatrefages De Bread
Quatrefages De Bread, De Jean Louis Armand De, French Naturalist: B. Berthezene, Gard, France, 10 Feb. 1810; D. Paris, France, 12 Jan. 1892. He Was Graduated From The University Of Strass Burg And In 1832 Settled In Toulouse Where He Practised Medicine And Shortly Afterward Founded The Journal De Midecine ...

Quay
Quay, Kwa, Matthew Stanley, American Politician: B. Dillsburg, York County, Pa., 30 P Sept. 1833; D. Beaver, A., 28 May 1904. He Was Graduated From Jefferson College In 1850, Studied Law, Was Admitted To The Bar In 1854 And Elected Prothonotary Of Beaver County In 1856 And 1859. During The ...

Quebec
Quebec, Siege Of, In The American Revo Lution. After Ethan Allen And Benedict Arnold (qq.v.) Had Captured Ticonderoga And Crown Point (qq.v.), Continental Congress, At Wash Ington's Earnest Solicitation, Decided To Con Qtier Canada As A Measure Of Self-defense. One Expedition Under Gen. Philip Schuyler (q.v.) Was To Proceed Northward ...

Quebec
Quebec, Kwe-bek (fr. Ki-1541c), One Of The Provinces Of Canada, The Largest In Area And Second In Population, In British North America. Its Capital Is The City Of Quebec. Ex Boundaries And Tent.—it Is Bounded On The North By Hudson Bay And Strait, On The East By Labrador And The ...

Quebec Act
Quebec Act; The Administrative Measure Passed By The British Parliament In 1774, For The Purpose Of Adding The Regions Extending To The Ohio And Mississippi Over Which The French Had Exercised Authority, To The Province Of Quebec, Which Had Been Limited By The Proc Lamation Of 1763 To An Area ...

Queens University
Queen's University. Queen's Uni Versity, Situated At Kingston On Lake Ontario, Is One Of The Largest Universities Of Canada. It Has Faculties Of Arts, Applied Science, Medicine, Education And Theology; And Holds A Yearly Summer School For Instruction In Certain Sub Jects In The Arts And Education Courses. De Grees ...

Queensland
Queensland, Australia, A State Of The Commonwealth, Prior To 1901 A Colony. It Oc Cupies The Northeastern Portion Of The Continent, North Of New South Wales And South Aus Tralia, And East Of The Latter. The Land Bounda Ries Are Mostly Artificial, The Meridians Of 138° And 141° East And ...

Queretaro
Queretaro, Mexico, Capital Of The State Of Queretaro, Distant From The City Of Mexico By The National Railway 167 Miles And By The Central 153 Miles, And From El Paso, Texas, By The Central 1,071 Miles And From Laredo, Tex., By The National 580 Miles; Eleva Tion 5,904 Feet Above ...

Quetzal
Quetzal, Lat-sal', A Very Beautiful Bird Of The Trogon (q.v.) Family (pharomarcus Ma: Cinno), Intimately Connected With The Mythol Ogy And History Of The Maya, Quiche And Nahuatl Races Of Mexico, Yucatan And Guate Mala. The Name Of The Bird In Aztec Is De Rived From Its Bright Green Color. ...

Quetzalcoatl
Quetzalcoatl, Ka-tal-kwatl, The Mexican (fair God," Is A Nature Deity Trans Formed Into A Great National T Od And The Founder Of A Priesthood. As He Is A Primitive Deity The Legendary Lore Connected With Him Assumes Many Forms. He Is The God Of The Winds Who, Driving The Clouds ...

Quichua
Quichua, Ke-choo'a, A Very Extensive South American Indian Family Composed Of Many Tribes Linguistically Closely Related. The Quichuas Inhabit Peru And Parts Of Ecuador And Bolivia And Neighboring Territory, And Their Language Is Quite Similar In Grammatical Struc Tupe And Ocabulary To That Of The Aymara Who, With Them, Formed ...

Quick Sand
Quick-sand, A • Tract Of Loose Sand Mixed With Water Which Will Not Support Heavy Bodies. In Appearance Quick-sands Do Not Differ From The Adjacent Sands. They Usually Occur On Flat Shores Underlain By Stiff Clay Or Other Impervious Materials And Especially Near The Mouths Of Large Rivers. They Appear ...

Quietism
Quietism, A Tendency In Religious Devo Tion Rather Than Any Specific System Of Religion Or Mysticism. It Consists In Making Christian Perfection A State Of Uninterrupted Contempla Tion Of Divine Things, The Soul Meanwhile Re Maining Quiet And Entirely Passive Under The Divine Influence, Heedless Of The Customary Pre Cepts ...

Quillaia Bark
Quillaia Bark, The Bark Of A South American Tree ( Uillaia Saponaria), Belonging To The Division Prcea Of The Order Rosacece. The Tree Has Smooth, Oval Leaves, And White Terminal Flowers, Solitary Or In Small Clusters. Kooch, Sul Arthur Thomas, Author: B. Cornwall, 21 Nov. 1863. He Was Educated At ...

Quince
Quince, A Shrub Or Small Tree (cydonia Saris) Of The Rose Family; A Native Of Central And Eastern Asia, Where It Was Cultivated More Than 2,000 Years Ago And Whence It Has Been Introduecd Into All Cool Temperate Countries Of The Civilized World. It Is A Close Relative Of The ...

Quincy
Quincy, Josiah, American Statesman And Educator: B. Boston, 4 Feb. 1772; D. Quincy, Mass., 1 July 1864. He Was Graduated From Harvard In 1790, Studied Law And In 1793 Was Admitted To Practice, And Gave Much Study To Political Problems. By His Oration In Old South 4 July 1798, He ...

Quincy_2
Quincy, Ill., City, Capital Of Adams County, On The East Bank Of The Mississippi River, 263 Miles South Of Chicago And 142 Miles North Of Saint Louis. It Is Built On An Elevated Plateau 160 Feet Above The High-water Mark Of The River. The Trade Of The City Is Extensive ...

Quinine
Quinine (lcvvin'en Or 'delft), Quin Ina, Or Quinia, A Drug (cohts/s1202) Largely Used In The Cure Of Malarial Fevers, In Which It Is Regarded As A Specific. It Is Also A Valuable Tonic. Quinine Is One Of The Five Most Important Of The 21 Alkaloids Obtained From The Bark Of ...

Quinsy
Quinsy, An Acute Inflammation Of The Tonsils; Acute Parenchymatous Tonsilitis. It Is Attended By Fever, Pain, Headache, Difficulty In Swallowing (dysphagia), And Frequently By Sup Puration. One Attack Seems To Predispose To Another. It Is Not Uncommon For Individuals To Have Attacks Year After Year At About The Same Time ...

Quint
Quint, Ke-na, Edgar, French Litterateur: B. Bourg, 17 Feb. 1803; D. Versailles, 27 March 1875. He Was Educated At The Schools Of Charolles And Bourg And The Lye& Of Lyons. His First Publication Was (tablettes Du Juif Errant> (1823), An Apology For His Abandon Ing The Military Career Which Had ...

Quintilianus
Quintilianus, Kwin-t/1-1-a'nt'is, Mar Ens Fabius, Roman Rhetorician: B. Calagurris (calahorra), Spain, About 40 A.d. ; D. About 118. He Was Educated At Rome, Where He Studied Under Domitius Afer, And About 69 Began To Practise As An Advocate. Subsequently He Be Came A Teacher Of Rhetoric, And Had Pliny The ...

Quito
Quito, Keta, Capital Of The Republic Of Ecuador, Situated Only A Few Miles South Of The Equator, But At A Height Of More Than 9,000 Feet Above Sea-level. Climatic Results Of Proximity To The Equatorial • Line Are Modified And Nearly Equalized Throughout The Year By Those Of Alti Tude; ...

Quo Vadis
Quo Vadis. Sienkiewicz, Early In The Nineues Of The Last Century, Devoted Himself To A Study Of The Latin Writers Of The First Few Christian Centuries And The Result Of These Studies Was 'quo Vadis,' A Historical Novel Of The Time Of Nero, Which Appeared In 1895 And Immediately Created ...

Quoits
Quoits, Kwoits, A Game Somewhat Resem Bling The Throwing Of The Discus Among The Ancients; Only The Discus Was Flat, While The Quoit Is Ring-shaped. (see Discus). The Quoits Are Made Of Metal, Usually Iron, And Are Com Paratively Thick At The Inner Edge Of The Ring, But Sharp Enough ...

Qvistgaard
Qvistgaard, Icvlsegard, J. W. Von Rehling; Danish Miniature Painter: B. Orsholt Gaard, Parish Of Tikjob, 1877. He Was Gradu Ated At The Royal Agricultural College Of Copen Hagen And In Opposition To Family Prejudice, As A Member Of The Danish Nobility, Selected Art As A Profession. After A Brief Course ...

Raab
Raab, Rib, Johann Leonhard, German Etcher And Engraver: B. Schwaningen, Near Anspach, Bavaria, 29 March 1825; D. Munich, 2 April 1899. He Was Educated At Nuremberg And At The Academy In Munich And Received An Appointment As Professor Of Engraving At The Latter Place In 1869, Which He Held Until ...

Raabe
Raabe, Ra'be, Wilhelm, German Novelist And Poet: B. Eschershausen, Duchy Of Bruns Wick, 8 Sept. 1831: D. 15 Nov. 1910, In The City Of Braunschweig. After Attending The Gymna Sia In Holzminden And Wolfenbattel, He En Tered A Book Store As Apprentice In 1849. He Used This Opportunity For Wide ...

Rabanus
Rabanus, Ra-ba'nfis, Or Hrabanus, Magnus, Carolingian Prelate: B. Mayence, About 776; D. Winkel, Near Mayence, 4 Feb. 856. His Education Was Obtained In The Cloister School Of Fukla, And Later At Tour, Where His Instruc Tor, Alcuin, Surnamed Him Maurus After The Legendary Founder Of The Order Of Saint Bene ...

Rabbit
Rabbit, A Name, When Properly Used, Re Stricted To A Single Species (lepus Cuniculus) Of The Rodent Family, Leporidce, To Which The Na Tive American Hares Also Belong. The Rabbit Is Of European Origin, And, Although Found Wild In Many Places, Is Better Known In The Domesticated Or Semi-domesticated State ...

Rabelais
Rabelais, Francois, Frah-swi French Author: B. Chinon, Touraine, About 1483 (according To Other Authorities 1490 Or 1495); D. Paris, 9 April 1553. Regarding His Birth, Parentage And Early Youth Nothing Definite Is Known. It Is A Fact, However, Established By Still Existing Documents, That In 1519 He Was A Member ...

Raccoon
Raccoon, The Name, Of Indian Derivation, Given To The Typical Members Of The Procyonitia, A Family Of Carnivorous Mammals, Resembling The Bears In Their Plantigrade Feet And Other Characteristics, But Differing From Them Espe Cially In The Long Tail, Sharp Snout, Slender Body And Moderate Size. All Of The Five ...

Races
Races, Origins Of Any Discussion Of Race Is Handicapped By Four Points Of Obscur Ity: Firstly, There Exists No Very Clear Idea In The Mind Of Many As To What Constitutes Race; Secondly, The Marks Of Differentiation Which Serve To Set Off One Race From Another Are Often Vaguely Presented; ...

Rachel
Rachel, Rd-shel (ei.isnarachelftrux), French Tragedienne: B. Mumpf, Canton Of Aargau, Switzerland, 28 Feb. 1820 Or 21; D. Le Cannet, Provence, 3 Jan. 1858. Her Father Was An Alsatian Jew, Naturalized In France, And After Much Wandering About Europe In His Trade Of Peddling Established His Family At Lyons, Where The ...

Racine
Racine, Jean Baptiste, Zhoil West A Sen, French Dramatist: B. La Ferte-milon, Picardy, 21 Dec. 1639; D. Paris, 21 April 1699. He Studied At The College Of Beauvais, And Subsequently At The Port-royal Institution, Where, Under The Care Of Lancelot And Lemaistre, He Became A Profound Greek Scholar. In 1658 ...

Racine_2
Racine, Wis., City County-seat Of Racine County, On Lake Michigan At The Mouth Of Root River, And On The Chicago, Milwaukee And Saint Paul And Northwestern Railroads, About 22 Miles South Of Milwaukee.and 65 Miles North Of Chicago. It Has Steamboat Connections With All The Lake Ports, And Electric Lines ...

Radcliffe
Radcliffe, Radldlf, Ann Ward, Eng Lish Novelist: B. London, 9 July 1764; D. There, 7 Feb. 1823. She Was Married At 23 To William Radcliffe, Afterward Editor And Proprietor Of The Weekly Called The English Ckeeneick. Her First Work Was
Radcliffe College
Radcliffe College, A College For The Education Of Women, Affiliated With Harvard University, Cambridge Mass. Its Forerunner Was The Society For Tie Collegiate Instruction Of Women, Organized In 1879 To Provide Syste Matic Instruction For Women By Professors And Instructors In Harvard. This Society Was In Corporated Three Years After ...

Radcliffe_2
Radcliffe, John, English Physician: B. Wakefield, 1650; D. Carshalton, Surrey, 1 Nov. 1714. He Was Educated At University College, Oxford, Was A Fellow Of Lincoln College, 1669 77, Graduated In Medicine In 1675 And, At Ox Ford, Began The Practice Of Medicine, But Remov Ing To London In 1684 Soon ...

Radetzky
Radetzky, Ra-at'sice, Johann Joseph Wenzel Anton Fritz Karl,count, Austrian Military Officer; B. Trebnitz, Bohemia, 2 Nov. 1766; D. Milan, Italy, 5 Jan. 1858. He Joined The Austrian Army In 1784, Served In The Campaigns Against The Turks In 1788-89, In Holland And Italy, 1793-96, In Various Parts Of Europe During ...

Radiation
Radiation. The Term Radiation Is Ap Plied To A Variety Of Cases In Which Energy Is Propagated Through Space Like Rays Of Light. The Case Most Studied Is That Of Heat. Heat Rays Are Regarded As Of The Same Character As Light Rays, The Two Merely Differing In Wave Length ...

Radioactivity
Radioactivity. The Discovery That Uranium Possesses The Property Of Spontane Ously And Continuously Emitting Penetrating Rays, Capable Of Passing Through Bodies Opaque To Ordinary Light, Was Made By Becquerel In 1896. Since That Time Our Knowledge Of The Subject Of Radioactivity Has Increased With Great Rapidity And A Very Large ...

Radish
Radish, Several Species Of Herbs Of The Family Brassicareat. The Common Garden Radish (raphanus Rativar) Is Thought To Be A Native Of Asia, But Is Not Known In A Wild State. It Is-cultivated For Its Edible Roots, Which In Various Varieties May Be Red, White, Gray, Brown Or Black, And ...

Radium
Radium (lat. Radius, Ray), Was Discov Ered In 1898 At Paris By Prof. Pierre Curie And Madame Sklodowska Curie H Collabora Tion With Monsieur Bemont. It Is The Most Important Of Over 30 Newly Discovered Radio Active Elements, And Was Found In The Sulphate Residues From Pitchblende Of The Austrian ...

Radium Therapy
Radium Therapy. Twenty Years After Madame Curie Announced The Discovery Of Radium, And 15 Years Of Experience With Its Use In Treatment Of Diseased Conditions, Is Long Enough To Give Some Idea Of Its Usefulness And Its Limitations. Radium Came Into Use As •a Sur Gical Agent Some Five Years ...