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The Plate Washing Arrangement

board, plates and tube

THE PLATE WASHING ARRANGEMENT.

tank at the right should be made of zinc, or it can be made of wood, with two coats of black varnish inside. A tube is inserted in front near the bottom, three-eighths of an inch opening, to which a large zinc or brass tube, eight to ten inches long is attached at its center, and at right angles to the smaller tube. This larger one is perforated with one-sixteenth inch holes in a line along its lower side, the holes being about three sixteenths of an inch apart. Through these holes the water from the tank is sprayed upon the plate placed on the washing board.

In the place of the large zinc or brass tube, the writer uses a joint of a common bamboo fish-pole, making the sprinkling holes one-eighth inch, as smaller ones are apt to clog. This does just as well as the metal tube and is cheaper.

The washing-board is made of seasoned pine, one inch thick, ten inches wide, and as long as the sink. A strip of smooth wood, three-eighths or one half-inch square, is nailed along each side and another near the center of the board, so as to leave the two spaces between them three and three-eighths, and five and one-eighth inches wide. The narrower of these will hold plates

three and one-quarter inches wide, and the other any width up to five inches. The board will be long enough to wash at one time half a dozen or more plates, separating them by pins. The plate first laid on the board is so placed that the water falls upon it near its upper end.

This is a most effective washing arrangement, plates being thoroughly washed in fifteen to twenty minutes, after which they are swabbed under the tap with cotton wool, and then placed in the rack to dry.

Larger plates, such as 6-ix8i, 8x10 or 10x11, can be washed with this same apparatus by laying them on the top of the strips or divisions of the board.

While we consider this one of the best arrangements for wash ing plates, it must not be supposed that it is the only thing for the amateur to use. Ready-made washing-boxes of good design, can be supplied by any dealer in photographic supplies.