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Food for the

gradually and characterised

FOOD FOR THE SICK.—See THE STANDARD PHYSICIAN, pages 698-7o5. FRACTURES OF THE BONE.—See under BONES, FRACTURE OF.

FRECKLES.—Small spots on the skin due to the increase of colouring matter in the epidermis. Freckles commonly occur in large numbers, and may be either inborn or caused by exposure to the sun.

Treatment.—A remedy recommended is : Naphthol, r drachm ; glycerine, 3o minims ; tincture of green soap, to make 3 ounces. Lotion to be applied twice daily, FREEZING.—There are three grades of freezing : (r) Characterised by bluish-red discoloration of the skin and accompanied by itching and pain ; (2) characterised by the formation of blisters, usually filled with a blood coloured fluid ; (3) characterised by gangrene of the frozen parts. See CHILBLAINS.

Treatment.—In restoring persons \vho have been frozen, the chief thing to do is to warm them gradually. Take the sufferer into an unheated room ; undress him carefully ; rub his body with cold, wet towels or with snow ; or place him in a full bath of cold water (6r° to 64° Fahr.), continue to rub

',.he body, raising the temperature of the bath gradually to 86° Fahr. As soon as the limbs have become a little more movable, resort to artificial respiration if necessary. When the patient begins to breathe spontaneously, place him in an unheated bed and cover him with blankets. Then gradually heat the room to a moderate temperature, and later the patient may be rubbed with towels, gradually made warmer and wanner. Just as soon as he is able to swallow, give him tea or coffee in large quantities, wine, or other alcoholic beverage. Consciousness is not fully restored until several hours have elapsed ; sometimes oulv after days.