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Tobacco

oil, ounce, drops, powdered, water, solution and ounces

TOBACCO POISONING.—For description, symptoms, etc., see THE STANDARD PHYSICIAN, pages 962-963, to61.

Treatment.—Cease smoking immediately. In acute cases the treatment consists of out the stomach with a weak solution of tannin. Give plenty of water or milk (lukewarm). If a stimulant is required give brandy or whisky.

TONSILITIS.—Inflammation of the tonsils. For classification, descrip tion, symptoms, etc., see TILE STANDARD PHYSICIAN, pages 964-965.

Treatment.—The best gargle or spray is hydrogen peroxide diluted with equal part water. The best internal remedy should contain tincture of chloride of iron well diluted, to drops to a dose. If the attack is severe, the patient should be put to bed, or at least kept in a warm, not overheated, room of even temperature. It is best to commence treatment with a slight. purgative, such as castor-oil, Epsom salt, or small, repeated closes of calomel, grain for four closes (see ABDOMINAL PAINS), and let him gargle with a solution of alum, 5 grains to i ounce of water or Listerine (see also GARGLES, in SORE THROAT). 1::v./enmity, apply hot linseed poultices (see AnnomiNAL Internally, take r tablespoonful every three hours of the following solution : One drachm each of sodium salicylate and potassium bromide, 2 drachms of potassium bicarbonate, 1 ounce of chloroform water, and water enough to make 3 ounces. Aspirin is also commended, and may take the place of the preceding, 5 grains three times a clay.

The tonsils should be painted three times a clay with tincture of iron chloride ; or tannin and glycerine, equal parts. A spray will also do good service ; Dobell's solution (see SORE THROAT), pure or diluted, or a solution of hydrogen peroxide may be used in the spray, r part to S parts of water. Cracked ice, to he swallowed in small pieces, is very soothing. If pus forms, the abscess should be opened by incision by a medical man as soon as possible. Danger may arise from the sudden bursting of the abscess.

In quinsy sore throat, give, besides the purgative and gargle, warm drinks, such as hot linseed tea or, still bettcr, hot milk, not ice. Apply to the throat a hot poultice and use the croup-kettle or cresoline lamp (see CRouP). The tonsils should be painted three times a day with glycerine and boric acid, or sprayed with Dobell's solution or hydrogen peroxide, as stated above.

TOOTHACHE.—See also TliE STANDARD PHYSICIAN, page 952.

Treatment.—A capsicum plaster placed on the gum (see Gum-BoiL) will often relieve the toothache. If there is a cavity in the tooth, dip a small piece of cotton into oil of cloves or oil of eucalyptus or creosote or chloroform, then the cotton should be dried somewhat and carefully inserted into the cavity.

Or use in the same way one of the following mixtures : Essential oil of mustard, 6 drops ; chloroform, 12 drops ; oil of sassafras, 6 drops ; alcohol, ounce. Or thymol, drachm ; chloroform, drachm ; alcohol, 2 ounces. Or menthol, drachm ; chloroform, r drachm ; alcohol, 2 ounces.

If a paste is preferred, dissolve dram of salicylic acid in, ounce of collo dion. This forms a plug in the cavity, thus covering the exposed nerve.

TOOTH-POWDER.—See MOUTH-WASH and also THE STANDARD PHYSICIAN, page 951. Nearly every druggist prepares his own tooth-powder, of which there are numerous varieties on the market. Of the tooth-powders manu factured and sold in the open market, calox, an oxygen calcium tooth-powder. is highly recommended.

One may mix one's own tooth-powder by using r pound of precipitated chalk, pound of powdered orris root, pound of sodium bicarbonate, ounce of powdered sugar. Mix thoroughly ; then take a small portion of the powder and mix this well with ounce of oil of wintergreen, and, if desired, colour with ounce of finely powdered carmine. When this has been thoroughly mixed, add to the remainder of the powder, rubbing the mixture thoroughly together until it is well blended and of a uniform colour. This is quite inexpensive.

A more costly preparation is the so-called rose tooth-powder : Take the ingredients used a.bove, omitting the oil of wintergreen and carmine. Take 4 ounces of the so-prepared powder and rub it well with ounce of finely powdered carmine, 6o drops of oil of rose, ro drops of oil of sandalwood, and io drops of oil of cassia. When this has been thoroughly blended, add it to the remainder.

Some prefer a saponaceous tooth-powder. This can be made of pound of precipitated chalk, pound of powdered orris root, 6 ounces of powdered white soap. Mix well, then proceed as before, using ounce of oil of winter green, 20 drops of oil of calamus, and ounce of finely powdered carmine.