Home >> Trees-worth-knowing-1922 >> The Redwood S to Yulan Magnolia

From "Trees Worth Knowing" by Julia Ellen Rogers 1922

The Redwood S
The Redwood. S. Sempervirens, Endl. The Redwood Comes Down To The Sea On The Western Slopes Of The Coast Range, From Southern Oregon To Monterey County In California, Tempting The Lumberman By The Wonderful Wealth And Accessibility Of These Groves Of Giant Trees. The Wood Is Soft, Satiny, Red, Like ...

The Rhododendron
The Rhododendron. The Heath Family, Of About Sixty-seven Genera, Distrib Uted Over The Temperate And Tropical Countries Of The Earth, Has Twenty-one Genera In The United States, Seven Of Which Have Tree Representatives. Azaleas, The Multi Tude Of The Heathers, The Huckleberries, The Madroftas, Call To Mind Flower Shows We ...

The Rock Elm U
The Rock Elm. U. Thonzasi, Sarg. The Rock Elm Or Cork Elm Chooses Dry, Gravelly Upland And Low Heavy Clay Soil, On Rocky Slopes And River Cliffs, From Ontario And New Hampshire Westward Through Northern New York, Southern Michigan To Nebraska And Missouri. It Is More Abundant And Of Largest ...

The Rusty Nannyberry V
The Rusty Nannyberry. V. Rufidulum, Ralf. The Rusty Nannyberry Is Easily Distinguished By The Rusty Hairs That Clothe Its New Shoots And The Stems And Veins Of The Leaves. White Flower Clusters Are Succeeded By Bright Blue Berries Of Unusual Size And Brilliance, Ripe In October, On Red-stemmed Pedicles. The ...

The Sassafras
The Sassafras. Sassafras, Karst. The Sole Remnant Of An Ancient Genus Is The Aro Matic Sassafras Familiar As A Roadside Tree That Flames In Autumn With The Star Gum And The Swamp Maples. In The Deep Woods It Reaches A Height Of More Than A Hundred Feet And Is An ...

The Scarlet Haw C
The Scarlet Haw. C. Pruinosa, K. Koch. The Scarlet Haw Found From Vermont To Georgia, And West To Missouri, Prefers Limestone Soil Of Mountain Slopes, And Is More Picturesque Than Beautiful. The Foliage Is Distinctive; It Is Dark, Blue-green, Smooth, And Leathery, Pale Beneath, And Turns In Autumn To Brilliant ...

The Scarlet Haw C_2
The Scarlet Haw. C. Coccinea, Linn. The Scarlet Haw, Native Of The Northeastern States, Is One Of The Oldest Native Thorns In Cultivation. It Is A Favorite In New England Gardens, Because Of Its Abundant Bloom, Deep Crimson Fruit And Vivid Autumn Foliage. It Is A Shrubby, Round-headed Tree, With ...

The Scarlet Oak Q
The Scarlet Oak. Q. Coccinea, Moench. The Scarlet Oak Is Like A Flaming Torch Set Among The Dull Browns And Yellows In Our Autumnal Woods. In Spring The Opening Leaves Are Red; So Are The Tasselled Catkins And The Forked Pistils, That Turn Into The Acorns Later On. This Is ...

The Scotch Elm U
The Scotch Elm. U. Montana, Linn. The Scotch Or Wych Elm Is Planted Freely In Parks And Private Grounds. It Is A Medium-sized Tree Of Rather More Strict Habit Of Growth Than The American Elm. Before The Leaves Open The Tree Often Looks Bright Green From A Distance. This Appearance ...

The Screw Bean P
The Screw Bean. P. Pztbescens, Benth. The Screw-bean Or Screw-pod Mesquite Is A Small Slender Trunked Tree With Sharp Spines At The Bases Of The Hoary Foliage. The Marked Distinction Between This Species And The Preceding One Is In The Fruit, Which Makes From Twelve To Twenty Turns As It ...

The Scrub Pine P
The Scrub Pine. P. Contorta, Loud. The Scrub Pine Is The Humble Parent Of One Of The Splen Did Western Lumber Pines, Whose Description Comes Under Its Varietal Name. Down The Coast Of Alaska, Usually In Sphagnum Bogs, On Sand-dunes, In Tide-pools And Deep Swamps To Cape Mendocino, The Indomitable, ...

The Sequoias
The Sequoias. Nowhere Else In The World Are Conifers Found In Such Ex Tensive Forests And In Such Superlative Vigor And Stu Pendous Size As In The States That Border The Pacific Ocean. California Is Particularly The Paradise Of The Conifers. All Of The Species That Make The Forests Of ...

The Service Berries
The Service Berries. A Small Genus Of Pretty, Slender Trees Related To Apples, And In The Rose Family, Has Representatives In Every Conti Nent Of The Northern Hemisphere, And Also In North Africa. Their Natural Range Is Greatly Extended By The Efforts Of Horticulturists, For The Trees Are Among The ...

The Service Berry
The Service Berry. Amelanchier Canadensis, T. & G. The Eastern Service-berry, June-berry, Or Shad-bush, Is Often Seen In Parks And On Lawns; Its Delicate, Purple Brown Branches Covered In April, Before The Oval Leaves Ap Pear, With Loose, Drooping Clusters Of White Flowers. (see Illustration, Page 182 .) Under Each ...

The Sheepberry
The Sheepberry. Viburnum Lentago, Linn. In Our Native Woods The Sheepberry Is A Small Round Headed Tree, With Slim, Drooping Branches And Oval Leaves, Finely Cut-toothed And Tapering To Wavy-winged Petioles. In Autumn These Leathery Leaves Change To Orange And Red, Their Shiny Surfaces Contrasting With The Dull Lining, Pitted ...

The Shingle Or Laurel
The Shingle Or Laurel Oak. Q. Imbricaria, Michx. The Shingle Or Laurel Oak May Be Met In Any Woodland From Pennsylvania To Nebraska, And South To Georgia And Arkansas. It May Be Large Or Small; A Well-grown Speci Men Reaches Sixty Feet, With A Broad, Pyramidal, Open Head. The Chief ...

The Shortleaf Pine P
The Shortleaf Pine. P. Echinata, Mill. The Shortleaf Pine Ranks Second To The Longleaf In Im Portance To The Lumber Industries Of The East And South. It Ranges From Staten Island, New York, To North Florida, And West Through West Virginia, Eastern Tennessee, Southern Missouri, Louisiana And Eastern Texas. It ...

The Silver Bell Trees
The Silver Bell Trees. The Silver Bell Tree (mohrodendron Tetraptera, Britt.) Earns Its Name In May When Among The Green Leaves The Clustered Bell Flowers Gradually Pale From Green To White, With Rosy Tints That Seem To Come From The Ruddy Flower Stems. A "snowdrop Tree" May Be Eighty Feet ...

The Silver Wattle A
The Silver Wattle. A. Dealbata The Silver Wattle Of Nursery Catalogues Is Named For Its Abundant, Silvery-pubescent, Feathery Foliage. Its Flow Ers—fluffy Golden Balls, Small But Abundant—make This A Wonderfully Showy Tree. Sea-green And Turquoise-blue Leaves, With Abundant Canary-yellow Bloom, Are Traits Of Many Different Acacias In Cultivation, All Of ...

The Slippery Elm U
The Slippery Elm. U. Fulva, Michx. The Slippery Elm Is Also Known As The Red Elm And Moose Elm, Because Its Wood Is Red And Moose Are Fond Of Brows Ing Its Young Shoots. In Regions Where Moose Are Rarely Seen, It Is The Small Boy Who Browses And Often ...

The Smoke Tree
The Smoke Tree. A Favorite Tree In American And European Gardens Is The Smoke Tree (cotinus), A Genus Which Has Native Repre Sentatives In Both Continents. The European C. Cotinus, Sarg., Was Brought To This Country By Early Horticulturists And In Some Respects It Is Superior To Our Native C. ...

The Smooth Sumach
The Smooth Sumach. Ii. Glabra, Linn. The Smooth Sumach (see Illustrations, Pages 150-151) Is Quite As Familiar As The Staghorn, As A Roadside Shrub. It Forms Thickets In Exactly The Same Way, And Its Foliage, Flow Ers And Fruit Make It Most Desirable For Decorative Planting, Especially For Glorious Autumnal ...

The Soft Maple A
The Soft Maple. A. Saccharinum, Linn. The Soft Maple Or Silver Maple (see Illustration, Page 199) Has A White-lined Leaf, Cleft Almost To The Midrib And Each Division Again Deeply Cut. It Is Quick And Ready To Grow, And Has Been Widely Planted As A Street Tree, Especially In Prairie ...

The Soft Pines
The Soft Pines. The Outward And Visible Sign Of A Soft Pine Is The Loose, Deciduous Sheath Of Its Leaf Bundles. The Scales Of Its Cones Are Usually Unarmed With Horns Or Prickles. The Wood Is Soft, Light Colored, Close-grained. The Number Of Leaves In A Bundle Is The Principal ...

The Sorrel Tree
The Sorrel Tree. The Sorrel Tree, Or Sour-wood (oxydendrum Arboreum, Dc.) Belongs Among The Heaths. Its Vivid Scarlet Autumn Foliage Is Its Chief Claim To The Admiration Of Gardeners. In Spring The Little Tree Is Beautiful In Its Bronze-green Foliage, And In Late July And August It Bears Long Branching ...

The Southwestern Walnut
The Southwestern Walnut. Juglans Rupestris, Engelm. The Walnut Of The Southwest Grows Into A Spreading, Lux Uriant Tree, Where Its Roots Find Water. But On The Canyon Sides, And Higher On Mountain Slopes, It Becomes A Stunted Shrub, Because Of Lack Of Moisture. The Nut Is Smaller Than That Of ...

The Spruces
The Spruces. The Distinguishing Mark Of Spruce Trees Is The Woody Or Horny Projection On Which The Leaf Is Set. Look At The Twigs Of A Tree Which You Think May Be A Fir Or A Spruce. Wherever The Leaves Have Fallen, The Spruce Twig Is Rough Ened By These ...

The Staghorn Sumach
The Staghorn Sumach. Rhus Hirta, Sudw. The Staghorn Sumach Is Named For The Densely Hairy, Forking Branchlets, Which Look Much Like The Horns Of A Stag "in The Velvet." The Foliage And Fruit Are Also Densely Clothed With Stiff Pale Hairs, Usually Red Or Bright Yellow. The Leaves Reach Two ...

The Striped Maple A
The Striped Maple. A. Pennsylvanicum, Linn. The Striped Maple Is Quickly Recognized By The Pale White Lines That Streak In Delicate Patterns The Smooth Green Bark Of The Branches. The Leaves Are Large And Finely Saw-toothed, With Three Triangular Lobes At The Top, The Yellowish Bell-flowers Hang In Drooping Clusters, ...

The Sugar Maple
The Sugar Maple. Acer Saccharum, Marsh. The Sugar Maple (see Illustration, Page 198-199) Is Eco Nomically The Most Important Member Of Its Family In This Country. As An Avenue And Shade Tree It Is Unsurpassed. It Is The Great Timber Maple, Whose Curly And Birds-eye Wood Is Loved By The ...

The Sugar Pine P
The Sugar Pine. P. Lambertiana, Dougl. The Sugar Pine (see Illustration, Page P231) Belongs In The Class With Those Tree Giants, The Sequoias, With Which It Grows In The Mountain Forests Of Oregon And California. John Muir Calls It "the Largest, Noblest, And Most Beautiful Of All The Pine Trees ...

The Sumachs
The Sumachs. The Sumach Family Contains More Than Fifty Genera, Con Fined For The Most Part To The Warmer Regions Of The Globe. Two Fruit Trees Within This Family Are The Mango And The Pistachio Nut Tree. Commercially Important Also Is The Turpentine Tree Of Southern Europe. The Japanese Lacquer ...

The Swamp Bay M
The Swamp Bay. M. Glauca, Linn. The Swamp Bay Has Lustrous, Bright Green Leaves With Silvery Linings. In Florida And Across To Texas And Arkan Sas It Grows Into A Superb Evergreen Tree, Fifty To Seventy Five Feet In Height. Northward Along The Atlantic Coast Its Growth Is Stunted As ...

The Swamp White Oak
The Swamp White Oak. Q. Platanoides, Sudw. The Swamp White Oak Loves To Stand In Wet Ground, Sometimes Even In Actual Swamps. Its Small Branches Shed Their Bark Like The Buttonwood, The Flakes Curling Back And Showing The Bright Green Under Layer. On The Trunk The Bark Is Thick, And ...

The Sweet Buckeye
The Sweet Buckeye. Ae. Oetandra, Marsh. The Sweet Buckeye Is A Handsome, Large Tree With Green Ish Yellow, Tubular Flowers And Leaves Of Five Slender, Elliptical Leaflets. Cattle Will Cat The Nuts And Paste Made From Them Is Preferred By Bookbinders; It Holds Well, And Book-loving Insects Will Not Attack ...

The Sweet Gum
The Sweet Gum. Liquidamber Styraciflua, Linn. The Sweet Gum Is A Tall Tree With A Straight Trunk, Four To Five Feet In Diameter, With Slender Branches Covered With Corky Bark Thrown Out In Wing-like Ridges. At First The Head Is Regular And Pyramidal, But In Old Age It Becomes Irregularly ...

The Sweet Leaf
The Sweet Leaf. Two Genera Of Trees In This Country Are Temperate Zone Representatives Of A Tropical Family Which Furnishes Ben Zoine, Torax, And Other Valuable Balsams Of Commerce. It Is Easy To See That These Trees Are Strangers From Warm Countries, For Many Of Their Traits Are Singularly Unfamiliar. ...

The Sweet Leaf_2
The Sweet Leaf. Symplocos Tinctoria, L'her. The Sweet Leaf Is Our Sole Representative Of A Large Genus Of Trees Native To The Forests Of Australia And The Tropics In Asia And South America. They Yield Important Drugs And Dyestuffs, Particularly In British India. But The Sweet Leaf Is A Small ...

The Sycamore Maple A
The Sycamore Maple. A. Pseudo-platanus, Linn. The Sycamore Maple Is Another European Immigrant, Whose Broad Leaf Is Thick And Leathery In Texture, And Pale Underneath. Its Late-opening Flowers Are Borne In Long Racemes, Followed By The Small Key Fruits Which Cling To The Twigs Over Winter, Making The Tree Look ...

The Sycamores Or Buttonwoods
The Sycamores Or Buttonwoods Platoons Occidentalis, Linn. Tree Is Wayward In Its Branching Habit, Its Twigs Irregular And Angular. When The Leaves Are Gone, It Is A Distressed Looking Object, Dangling Its Seed-balls In The Wind Until The Central, Bony Cob Is Bare, The Seeds Having All Sailed Away On ...

The Tamarack
The Tamarack. Larix Americana, Michx. The Tamarack Or American Larch (see Illustration, Page ' 263) Goes Farther North Than Any Other Tree, Except Dwarf Willows And Birches. Above These Stunted, Broad-leaved Trees Pure Forests Of Tamarack Rise, Covering Northern Swamps From Newfoundland And Labrador To Hudson Bay And West Across ...

The Texas Ebony
The Texas Ebony. Zigia Flexicaulis, Sudw. The Texas Ebony Is A Beautiful, Acacia-like Tree Of South Ern Texas And Mexico. One Of The Commonest And Most Beautiful Trees On The Bluffs Along The Coast, South Of The Rio Grande. Its Leaves Are Feathery, Fern-like, Its Flowers In Creamy Clusters, Its ...

The Tulip Tree
The Tulip Tree. Liriodendron Tulipifera, Linn. The Tulip Tree Is A Cousin, Rather Than A Sister, To The Fore Going Magnolias. It Stands Alone In Its Genus In America, But Has A Sister Species That Grows In The Chinese Interior. A Tall, Stately Forest Tree, It Reached Two Hundred Feet ...

The Two Foxtail Pines
The Two Foxtail Pines. Two Western Pines Are Distinguished By The Common Name "foxtail Pine," Because The Leaves Are Crowded On The Ends Of Bare Branchlets. P. Balfouriana, M. Murr., Has Stiff, Stout Dark Green Leaves With Pale Linings. The Tree Is Wonderfully Picturesque When Old, With An Open Irregular ...

The Umbrella Tree M
The Umbrella Tree. M. Tripetala, Linn. The Umbrella Tree Has An Umbrella-like Whorl Of Leaves Surrounding The Flower Whose White Cup Stands Above Three Recurving White Sepals. The Whole Tree.suggests An Umbrella, So Closely Thatched Is Its Dome Of Thin, Bright Green Leaves. The Stout Contorted Branches And Twigs Lack ...

The Viburnums
The Viburnums. The Honeysuckle Family, Which Includes A Multitude Of Ornamental Shrubs, Furnishes Two Genera With Three Repre Sentatives. Handsome Foliage, Showy Flowers, And At Tractive Fruits Justify The Popularity Of This Family In Gardens And Parks. The Viburnums Are Distributed Over The Northern Hemisphere And Extend Into The Tropics. ...

The Vine Maple A
The Vine Maple. A. Circinatum, Pursh. The Vine Maple Reminds One Of The Lianas Of Tropical Woods, For It Has Not Sufficient Stiffness To Stand Erect. It Grows In The Bottom Lands And Up The Mountain Sides, But Always Following Water-courses, From British Columbia To Northern California. Its Vine-like Stems ...

The Walnuts Thenut
The Walnuts - The Nut Trees. Hickories Are Included With Their Near Relatives, The Walnuts, In One Of The Most Important Of All Our Native Tree Groups. They Are Distinct, Yet They Have Many Traits In Common—the Flowers And The Nut Fruits, The Hard Resinous Wood, With Aromatic Sap And ...

The Western Hemlock T
The Western Hemlock. T. Heterophylla, Sarg. The Western Hemlock Is A Giant That Dominates Other Trees In The Western Mountain Forests, Famous For Their Giants Of Many Different Names. It Is A Noble Pyramidal Tree That Reaches Two Hundred Feet In Height And A Maxi Mum Trunk Diameter Of Ten ...

The Western Juniper J
The Western Juniper. J. Occidentalis, Hook. The Giant Of Its Race Is The Western Juniper, One Of The Patriarchial Trees Of America, Ranking In Age With The Sequoias. Never A Tall Tree, It Yet Attains A Trunk Diameter Of Ten Feet, And An Age That Surely Exceeds Two Thousand Years. ...

The Western Larch L
The Western Larch. L. Occidentalis, Nutt. The Western Larch Is The Finest Tree In Its Genus, Reaching Six Feet In Trunk Diameter And Two Hundred Feet In Height, In The Cascade Forests From British Columbia To Southern Oregon And Across The Ranges To Western Montana. This Tree Has The Unusual ...

The Western Pitch Pine
The Western Pitch Pine. P. Coulteri, D. Don. The Western Pitch Pine, Most Abundant In The San Bernardino And San Jacinto Mountains, At Elevations Of About A Mile Above The Sea, Has Cones Not Unlike Those Of The Digger Pine, In The Armament Of Their Scales. These Are Notable By ...

The Western Service Berry
The Western Service Berry. A. Alnifolia, Nutt. The Western Service-berry Grows Over A Vast Territory Which Extends From The Yukon River South Through The Coast Ranges To Northern California And Eastward To Man Itoba And Northern Michigan. In The Rich Bottom Lands Of The Lower Columbia River, And On The ...

The Western Yellow Pine
The Western Yellow Pine. P. Ponderosa, Laws. The Western Yellow Pine Forms On The Colorado Plateau The Most Extensive Pine Forests Of The American Continent. Mountain Slopes, High Mesas, Dry Canyon Sides, Even Swamps, If They Occur At Elevations Above Twenty-five Hundred Feet, Furnish Suitable Habitats For This Amazing Species, ...

The White Ash
The White Ash. Fraxinus Americana, Linn. The White Ash Is One Of The Noblest Trees In The American Forest, The Peer Of The Loftiest Oak Or Walnut. When Young It Is Slim And Graceful, But It Grows Sturdier As It Approaches Maturity, Lifting Stout, Spreading Branches Above A Tall, Massive ...

The White Bark Pine
The White Bark Pine. P. Albicaulis, Engelm. The White-bark Pine Is A Rippled, Gnarled, Squatting Tree, Whose Matted Branches, Cumbered With Needles And Snow, Make A Platform On Which The Hardy Mountain Climber May Walk With Safety In Midwinter. It Offers Him A Springy Mattress For His Bed, As Well. ...

The White Birch B
The White Birch. B. Populifolia, Marsh. The White Birch Is A Small, Short-lived Tree That Grows In Swampy Ground, Its Bark Chalky White Or Grayish, With Triangular Rough Patches Of Black, Where Branches Are Or Have Been. (the Canoe Birch Has A Clean Bole, Chalky White, With None Of These ...

The White Cedar
The White Cedar. Chamaecyparis Thyoides, Britt. The Genus Chamaecyparis Includes Three American Species, Of Tall, Narrow Pyramidal Habit And Flat Leaf-spray Like That Of The Arbor-vitae. Annual Erect Globular Cones Of Few, Woody Scales, Produce One To Five Seeds Under Each. This White Cedar Is The Swamp-loving Variety Of The ...

The White Elm
The White Elm. Ulmus Americana, Linn. The White Or American Elm Is Widely Known As A Tall, Graceful Wide-spreading Tree, Usually Of Symmetrical, Vase Shape, With Slender Limbs And Drooping Twigs. (see Illustration, Page 215.) It Has The Rough Furrowed Bark Characteristic Of The Genus, Dark Or Light Gray, With ...

The White Fir A
The White Fir. A. Grandis, Lindl. The White Fir Is A Striking Figure, From Its Silvery Lined, Dark Green Foliage, Its Slender Pyramidal Form That Reaches Three Hundred Feet In Height, And The Vivid Green Of Its Mature Cones That Are Destitute Of Ornament And Slenderly Cylindrical. From Vancouver Island ...

The White Fir A_2
The White Fir. A. Concolor, Lindl. And Gord. This White Fir Is A Giant Of The Sierras, But A Tree Of Medium Height In The Rocky Mountains. Its Leaves Are Often Two To Three Inches Long, Very Unusual For A Fir Tree, Curving To An Erect Position, Pale Blue Or ...

The White Mulberry M
The White Mulberry. M. Alba, Linn. The White Mulberry Is A Native Of Northern China And Japan. From This Region It Has Been Extensively Intro Duced Into All Warm Temperate Climates. Its White Berries Are Of Negligible Character. It Is The Leaves That Give This Oriental Mulberry A Unique Position ...

The White Oak
The White Oak. The White Oak Has No Rival For First Place In The Esteem Of Tree-lover And Lumberman. Its Broad, Rounded Dome, Sturdy Trunk, And Strong Arms (see Illustration, Page 38), And Its Wide-ranging Roots Enable A Solitary Tree To Resist Storms That Destroy Or Maim Other Kinds. Strength ...

The White Pine
The White Pine. Pinus Strobus, Linn. The White Pine (see Illustrations, Pages Is The Only Pine East Of The Rocky Mountains That Bears Its Leaves In Bundles Of Five. This Semi-decimal Plan Is Found In Three Western Soft Pines And Two Western Hard Pines; But In The East, A Native ...

The White Poplar
The White Poplar. Populus Alba, Linn. The White Poplar Is Sometimes Called The Silver-leaved Poplar Because Its Dark, Glossy Leaves Are Lined With Cot Tony Nap. This Sprightly Contrast Of Light And Shade In The Foliage Is Most Unusual, And Very Attractive In Early Spring; But The Leaf-linings Collect Soot ...

The Wild Black Cherry
The Wild Black Cherry. P. Serotina, Ehrh. The Wild Black Cherry Or Rum Cherry (see Page 166), Is The Substantial Lumber Tree Of The Genus, Whose Ponderous Trunk Furnishes Cherry Wood, Vying With Mahog Any And Rosewood In The Esteem Of The Cabinet-maker, Who Uses Cherry For Veneer Oftener Than ...

The Wild Cherry
The Wild Cherry. Prunus Pennsylvanica, Linn. The Wild Red, Bird, Or Pin Cherry Grows In Rocky Woods, Forming Thickets And Valuable Nurse Trees To Hardwoods, From Newfoundland To Georgia, And West To The Rocky Mountains. The Birds Enjoy The Ruddy Little Fruits And Hold High Carnival In June Among The ...

The Wild Crab
The Wild Crab. Al. Coronaries, Mill. Throughout The Wooded Regions, From The Great Lakes To Texas And Alabama, The Wild Crabapple Brightens The Spring Landscape With Its Rose-colored, Spicy-scented Blos Soms. The Little Trees Huddle Together, Their Flat Tops Often Matted And Reaching Out Sidewise From Under The Shade Of ...

The Wild Red Plum
The Wild Red Plum. Prunus Americanus, Marsh. The Wild Red Or Yellow Plum Forms Dense Thickets In Moist Woods And Along River Banks From New York To Texas And Colorado. Its Leafless, Gnarled, And Thorny Twigs Are Covered In Spring With Dense Clusters Of White Bloom, Honey-sweet In Fragrance, A ...

The Willow Oak Q
The Willow Oak. A Southern Tree, Deservedly Popular In Cities For Shade And Ornamental Planting, It Is Nevertheless Hardy In Philadelphia And New York; And A Good Little Specimen Seems To Thrive In Boston, In The Arnold Arboretum. As A Lumber Tree, The Species Is Unimportant. ...

The Willows
The Willows Along The Watercourses The Willow Family Finds Its Most Congenial Habitat. It Is A Very Large Family, Numbering More Than One Hundred And Seventy Species, Which Are, However, Mostly Shrubs Rather Than Trees. America Has Seventy Species Of Willows, And New Forms Are Constantly Being Discovered, Which Are ...

The Winged Elm U
The Winged Elm. U. Alata, Michx. The Winged Elm, Or Wahoo, Is Dainty And Small, Its Leaves And The Two Thin Corky Blades That Arise On Each Twig Befitting The Smallest Elm Tree In The Family. Despite Its Corky Wings, It Has None Of The Ruggedness Of The Cork Elm, ...

The Witch Hazel
The Witch Hazel. Eighteen Genera Compose The Sub-tropical Family In Which Hamainclis Is The Type. Two Or Three Asiatic Species And One American Are Known. The Witch Hazel (flamamelis Virginiana, Linn.) Is A Stout, Many-stemmed Shrub Or A Small Tree,:with Rough Unsymmet Rical Leaves, Strongly Veined, Coarsely Toothed, And Roughly ...

The Yaupon I
The Yaupon. I. Vomitoria, The Yaupon Is A Shrubby Tree Of Spreading Habit, With Very Small, Oval, Evergreen Leaves And Red Berries. It Grows From Virginia To Florida And West To Texas And Arkansas. A Nauseating Beverage, Made By Boiling Its Leaves, Was The Famous "black Drink" Of The Indians. ...

The Yellow Birch B
The Yellow Birch. B. Haat, Michx. The Yellow Birch Shows Gleams Of Yellow Under Every Rent In Its Gray, Silky, Frayed-out Surface. Here Is A Timber Tree Of Considerable Size And Value: Its Hard Wood Furnishes The Frames Of Northern Sledges; The Knots And Burs Make Good Mallets; The Curiously ...

The Yellow Wood
The Yellow Wood. Cladrastis Lutea, K. Koch. The Yellow-wood Was Named By The Wife Of A Pioneer, Surely, For She Soaked The Chips And Got From Them A Clear Yellow Dye, Highly Prized For The Permanent Color It Gave To Her Homespun Cotton And Woolen Cloth That Must Have Gone ...

Tideland Spruce P
Tideland Spruce. P. Sitchensis, Carr. The Tideland Spruce Is The Most Important Lumber Tree In Alaska. It Inhabits The Coast Region From Cape Mendo Cino, In California, Northward; And Is Abundant On Wet, Sandy And Swampy Soil. The Conspicuous Traits Of This Tree Are Its Strongly Buttressed Trunk, One Hundred ...

Weeping Willow
Weeping Willow. Salix Babylonica The Weeping Willow, Much Planted In Cemeteries And Parks, Came Originally From Asia And Is Remarkable For Its Narrow Leaves That Seem Fairly To Drip From The Pendulous Twigs. (see Illustration, Page 55.) The Foliage Has A Wonderful Lightness And Cheerfulness Of Expression, Despite Its Weeping ...

Western Dogwood C
Western Dogwood. C. Nuttallii, Aud. The Pacific Coast Outdoes The Rest Of The Country In The Size Of Its Forest Trees. Superlatives In Vegetation Abound Where The Breath Of The Japan Current Tempers The Air. The Western Dogwood Often Reaches One Hundred Feet In Height In The Forests Near Seattle. ...

Yulan Magnolia
Yulan Magnolia. Magnolia Yulan The Yulan Magnolia, For Centuries A Favorite In Japanese Gardens, Covers Itself Before The Leaves Appear With Pure White, Fragrant Flowers, Bell-shaped And Fully Six Inches Across. In Our Eastern Gardens It Is Quite As Much At Home, And Though Young Trees Are Oftenest Seen, The ...