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Altyn Tagh
Altyn Tagh, The Northernmost Of The Constituent Ranges Of The Kuen-lun (q.v.), Which Separates The High Plateau Of Tibet On The South From The Depression Of The Tarim Basin On The North (see Asia). ...

Aludel
Aludel, A Pear-shaped Pot, Generally Made Of Earthenware And Open At Both Ends, So That A Series May Be Formed, The Neck Of One Aludel Fitting Into The Base Of The Next. Aludels Were Used By The Early Chemists And Are Still Employed At Almaden In Spain, In Connection With ...

Alum
Alum, The Name Given In Commerce And By Long Popular Usage To A Double Salt Composed Of Aluminium Sulphate And Potas Sium Sulphate. In Chemistry The Name Is Applied To A Whole Series Of Sulphates, Which Form One Of The Most Important Examples Of Isomorphism (q.v.). The Potassium Of Common ...

Alumina
Alumina, The Only Aluminium (q.v.) Oxide. It Occurs As Corundum, Which Is A Hard Colourless Crystalline Solid, As Ruby, Sapphire, Topaz, Etc. (tinted By Other Metallic Oxides), And In Bauxite (q.v.) . Amorphous Alumina May Be Obtained By Ignition Of Aluminium Hydrate, Or Aluminium Sulphate, Etc. Synthetic Rubies Are Made ...

Aluminium Bronze
Aluminium Bronze, The Name Originally Given To An Alloy Containing 9o% Copper And Io% Aluminium. Later, Alloys With Smaller Percentages Of Aluminium And Also Those Containing, In Addition, I %-4% Of Manganese And Iron Were Included Under The General Term "aluminium Bronzes." The Maximum Percentage Of Aluminium In Industrial Bronzes ...

Aluminium Industrial Alloys
Aluminium - Industrial Alloys These Alloys May Be Divided Into Two Main Classes : Those In Which Small Proportions Of Aluminium Modify The Properties Of Other Metals And Those In Which Other Metals Are Added For This Purpose To Aluminium. The First Category Includes The Aluminium Bronzes (q.v.) Which Are ...

Aluminium Isolation Andextraction
Aluminium - Isolation And Extraction When In The Middle Of The I 8th Century It Was Recognized That Alumina Was The Oxide Of A Metal, All Means Available At The Time Were Employed, Though Unsuccessfully, To Smelt It. Indeed, La Voisier, In 1782, Expressed The Belief That Alumina Could Not ...

Aluminium Or Aluminum
Aluminium Or Aluminum, A Metallic Element Which Owes Its Name To The Romans, Who Called Certain Salts, Now Be Lieved To Be The Mixed Sulphates Of Iron And Aluminium, Alumen. These Salts Were Found In The Volcanic Districts Washed By The Mediterranean And Were Much Used In Medicine And The ...

Aluminium Properties
Aluminium - Properties Form And Structure.—aluminiumwhen Cast From The Fur Naces Solidifies In Crystal Masses, As May Be Seen If An Ingot Be Broken At Temperatures Just Below The Melting Point. Mechanical Working Deforms And Partly Shatters The Original Crystals, But Subsequent Heating Causes Recrystallization. When The Degree Of Deformation ...

Alundum
Alundum, A Hard Material Belonging To The Class Of Abrasives (q.v.), Also Used For The Manufacture Of Laboratory Appa Ratus. It Is Obtained By Fusing Bauxite (q.v.) In An Electric Furnace. ...

Alunite Or Alumstone
Alunite Or Alumstone, A Mineral First Observed In The Century At Tolfa, Near Rome, Where It Is Mined For The Manu Facture Of Alum. Extensive Deposits Are Also Worked In Tuscany And Hungary, And At Bulladelah In New South Wales. By Repeat Edly Roasting And Lixiviating The Mineral, Alum Is ...

Aluntium
Aluntium, An Ancient City Of Sicily, (gr. 'axov7-loii, Mod. S. Marco D'alunzio), 6 M. From The North Coast And 25 M. E.n.e. Of Halaesa. It Was Probably Of Sicel Origin, Though Its Foundation Was Ascribed To Some Of The Companions Of Aeneas. It Suffered Considerably At The Hands Of Verres. ...

Alur
Alur (lur, Luri, Lurem), A Negro People Of The Nile Valley, Living On The North-west Coast Of Albert Nyanza. They Are Akin To The Acholi (q.v.), Speaking Practically The Same Language. ...

Alure
Alure, A Rare Architectural Term For A Passageway Or Gutter Behind A Parapet Or A Clerestory ; Sometimes Written Valure Or Valoring. ...

Alva
Alva, Municipal Burgh, Clackmannanshire, Scotland, 3 +m. N. Of Alloa, Terminus Of A Branch Line Of The L.n.e.r. Pop. 4,853. It Is Situated At The Foot Of Three Front Peaks Of The Ochils—west Hill (1,682ft.), Middle Hill (i,436ft.) And Wood Hill (1,723ft.). There Are Spinning-mills, And Also Manufactures Of Tweeds, ...

Alvarez Quintero
Alvarez Quintero, The Name Of Two Brothers, Serafin (1871-1938) And Joaquin (1873— ), Spanish Dramatists, Born At Utrera. They Revived In Their Graceful Plays The Traditional Humour Of Rueda's Pesos. These Plays Deal Chiefly With Scenes Of Andalusian Life And Include Such Subjects As Los Galeotes (1900) , El Patio ...

Alveary
Alveary (lat. Alvearium), A Beehive; Used, Like Apiarium, Figuratively For A Collection Of Hard-working People, Or A Scholarly Work (e.g., Dictionary) Involving Bee-like Industry. By Analogy The Term Is Used For The Hollow Of The Ear, Where The Wax Collects. ...

Alwar
Alwar, An Indian State In The Rajputana Agency. Its Con Figuration Is Irregular, The Greatest Length From North To South Be Ing About 8om., And Breadth From East To West About 6om., With A Total Area Of 3,158sq.m. The Eastern Portion Of The State Is Open And Highly Cultivated; The ...

Alypius Of Antioch
Alypius Of Antioch, A Geographer Of The 4th Century, Who Was Sent By The Emperor Julian Into Britain As First Prefect, And Was Afterwards Commissioned To Rebuild The Temple Of Jeru Salem. Among The Letters Of Julian Are Two (29 And 3o) Addressed To Alypius, One Inviting Him To Rome, ...

Alypius
Alypius, A Greek Writer On Music Whose Works, With Those Of Six Others, Were Collected And Published With A Commentary And Explanatory Notes (antiquae Musicae Auctores Septem, Amstel., 1652), By Mark Meibomius (1630-1711). He Is Said To Have Written Before Euclid And Ptolemy; And Cassiodorus Arranges His Introduction To Music ...

Alytes
Alytes, A Genus Of Batrachians Of Which The Best Known Is The Midwife Toad, Alytes Obstetricans, Two Inches In Length, Of Dull Greyish Coloration, Plump Form With Warty Skin And Large Eyes. Although Toad-like It Belongs To Another Family, Disco Glossidae. It Inhabits Most Of Western Europe. A Second Species, ...

Alzey
Alzey, A Town In Hesse, Germany, Tom. S.s.w. Of Mainz. Pop. It Is Mentioned In The Nibelungenlied. In 1277 It Became An Imperial City, And In 162o Was Sacked By The Span Iards And In 1689 Burnt By The French. During The Napoleonic Wars It Was Annexed To France And ...

Amadis De Gaula
Amadis De Gaula. This Famous Romance Of Chivalry Survives Only In A Castilian Text, But It Is Claimed By Portugal As Well As By Spain. The Date Of Its Composition, The Name Of Its Author, And The Language In Which It Was Originally Written Are Not Yet Settled. It Is ...

Amadou
Amadou, A Soft Tough Substance Once Frequently Used As Tinder, Derived From Polyporus Fomentarius, A Fungus Belonging To The Group Basidiomycetes And Growing Upon Old Trees, Espe Cially The Oak, Ash, Fir And Cherry. The Fungus Is Cut Into Slices And Then Steeped In A Solution Of Nitre. Amadou Is ...

Amakusa
Amakusa, An Island Of About 2oosq.m. Off The West Coast Of The Larger Island Of Kyushu In South Japan (3 2 ° 25' N., 130° E.). Its Conformation Is Typical Of That Of The Whole West Flank Of Kyushu, A Hilly Country Broken Up Along North-east To South-west Lines ; ...

Amal
Amal, The Name Of The Noblest Family Among The Ostrogoths And That From Which Nearly All Their Kings Were Chosen. The Family First Appears In History In The 4th Century A.d. ...

Amalaric
Amalaric (died 531), King Of The Visigoths, Son Of Alaric Ii., Was A Child When His Father Fell In Battle Against Clovis, King Of The Franks (507) . He Was Carried For Safety Into Spain, Which Country And Provence Were Thenceforth Ruled By His Maternal Grandfather, Theodoric The Ostrogoth, Acting ...

Amalasuntha Or Amalasuentha
Amalasuntha Or Amalasuentha, Queen Of The Ostrogoths (d. 535), Daughter Of Theodoric, King Of The Ostro Goths, Was Married In 515 To Eutharic, An Ostrogoth Of The Old Amal Line, Who Had Previously Been Living In Spain. Her Husband Died, Apparently In The Early Years Of Her Marriage, Leaving Her ...

Amalekites
Amalekites, An Ancient Tribe, Or Collection Of Tribes, Be Longing To The Bedouin Type, Familiar From Their Relations To Israel. Though Hebrew Ethnology Made Them A Subordinate Branch Of Edom (gen.xxxvi.12), And (if The Text Of Judges V.14 And Xii.15 Be Correct) Even Connected Them Closely With The Tribe Of ...

Amalfi
Amalfi, Town And Archiepiscopal See, Campania, Italy, In . The Province Of Salerno, I2m. W.s.w. By Road From The Town Of That Name, On The North Coast Of The Gulf Of Salerno. Pop. This Picturesque Old City Lies At The Mouth Of A Deep Ravine, Sheltered At The Foot Of ...

Amalgam
Amalgam, The Name Applied To An Alloy Containing Mercury, And Said By Andreas Libavius To Be A Corruption Of ?axayua ; In The Alchemists The Form Algamala Is Also Found. Many Amal Gams Are Formed By The Direct Contact Of A Metal With Mercury, Sometimes With Absorption, Sometimes With Evolution, ...

Amalgamation In Metallurgy
Amalgamation - In Metallurgy Amalgamation Is The Process Of Extracting Gold And Silver From Their Ores By Means Of Mercury. It Depends On The Fact That Mer Cury, Or Quicksilver As It Is Usually Called By Metallurgists, "wets" And Adheres To Metallic Gold And Silver And Penetrates Them, Form Ing ...

Amalgamation
Amalgamation. The Term Amalgamation, In Its Indus Trial Sense, Is One Of A Number Of Terms Used To Denote The Process Whereby Previously Independent And Probably Competing Busi Ness Concerns Join Forces And Become A Single Concern Conducted Under A Unified Financial And Industrial Control. Amalgamation Is Usually Spoken Of ...

Amalric Ii
Amalric Ii., King From I197 To 1205, Was The Brother Of Guy Of Lusignan. He Married Isabella, The Daughter Of Amalric I., By His Second Marriage, And Became King Of Jerusalem In Right Of His Wife In 1197. In 1198 He Was Able To Procure A Five Years' Truce With ...

Amalric Of Bena
Amalric Of Bena (fr. Amaury) (d. C. 1204-1207), French Theologian, Who Taught Philosophy And Theology At The University Of Paris, And Enjoyed A Great Reputation As A Subtle Dialectician. His Lectures Developing The Philosophy Of Aristotle Attracted A Large Circle Of Hearers. In 1204 His Doctrines Were Condemned By The ...

Amalric
Amalric, The Name Of Two Kings Of Jerusalem. Amalric I., King From 1 162 To 1174, Was The Son Of Fulk Of Jerusalem And The Brother Of Baldwin Iii. He Was Twice Married; By His First Wife, Agnes Of Edessa, He Had Issue A Son And A Daughter, Baldwin Iv. ...

Amalteo
Amalteo, The Name Of An Italian Family Belonging To Oderzo, Treviso, Several Members Of Which Were Distinguished In Literature. The Best Known Are Three Brothers, Geronimo (1507 74) , Giambattista (15 2 And Cornelio (153o-16o3), Whose Latin Poems Were Published In One Collection Under The Title Trium Fratrum Amaltlieorum Carmina ...

Amaltheia
Amaltheia, In The Earlier Greek Mythology, The Foster Mother Of Zeus. She Is Sometimes Represented As The Goat Which Suckled The Infant God In A Cave In Crete, Sometimes As A Nymph Of Uncertain Parentage, Who Brought Him Up On The Milk Of A Goat. This Goat Having Broken Off ...

Amandus Heinrich Adamsen
Adamsen, Amandus Heinrich ) Estonian Sculptor, Studied In St. Petersburg (leningrad). In 1887 He Produced A Portrait In Relief Of Tsar Alexander Iii.; He Then Went To Paris, Where He Lived For Several Years. In 1891 He Returned To His Native Land And Lived Alternately In Port Baltic And St. ...

Amanita
Amanita. The Amanitas Include Some Of The Most Showy Representatives Of The Agaricineae Or Mushroom Order Of Fungi (q.v.). In The First Stages Of Growth, They Are Completely En Veloped By An Outer Covering Called The Veil. As The Plant De Velops The Veil Is Ruptured; The Lower Portion Forms ...

Amanuensis
Amanuensis, One Who Writes, From Dictation Or Other Wise, On Behalf Of Another (from Lat. Serous A Manu, Slave Of The Hand) . An Amanuensis Differs From A Secretary In That, As A Rule, He Is A Copyist Only. ...

Amanullah Khan
Amanullah Khan ), Amir Of Afghanistan, Was Born June I, 1892, Being The Third Son Of Habibullah Khan By His Principal Wife, Ulya Hazrat. On Feb. 20, 1919, Habibullah Khan Was Assassinated, Whereupon His Brother, Nasrullah Khan, Seized The Reins Of Government. Six Days Later, However, Amanullah Khan Declared Himself ...

Amapala
Amapala, The Pacific Port Of Honduras, Central America. Population, About 3,000. Amapala Is Located On Tigre Island, In The Gulf Of Fonseca, And Passengers And Freight To And From The Interior Are Carried On Barges Or Launches To San Lorenzo, On The Mainland, The Terminus Of The Highway To Tegucigalpa ...

Amara Sinha
Amara Sinha (c. A.d. 375), Sanskrit Grammarian And Poet. He Is Said To Have Been "one Of The Nine Gems That Adorned The Throne Of Vikramaditya," And According To The Evidence Of Hsiian Tsang, This Is The Chandragupta Vikramaditya That Flour Ished About A.d. 375. The Only Work Of His ...

Amaranth Or Amarant
Amaranth Or Amarant, A Name Chiefly Used In Poetry, And Applied To Certain Plants Which, From Not Soon Fading, Typified Immortality (from The Gr. Aµapavros, Unwithering). The Plant Genus Amarantus (of The Family Amarantacea) Con Tains Several Well-known Garden Plants, Such As Love-lies-bleed Ing (a. Caudatus), A Native Of India, ...

Amarapura
Amarapura, A Suburb Of Mandalay, Burma; Pop. 0930 8,254. The Town Was Founded In 1783 To Form A New Capital About 6m. To The North-east Of Ava. In 181 O It Was Estimated To Contain I70,00o Inhabitants; But A Fire In That Year And The Removal Of The Native Court ...

Amarar Um Arar Or
Amarar (um 'ar'ar Or Beni 'amir), A Tribe Of African "arabs" Inhabiting The Mountainous Country On The West Side Of The Red Sea From Suakin Northwards Towards E Osseir. The Tribe Is Divided Into Four Great Families: (i) Weled Gwilei, (2) Weled Aliab, (3) Weled Kurbab Wagadab And (4) The ...

Amaravati
Amaravati, A Ruined City Of India In The Guntur District Of The Madras Presidency, On The South Bank Of The Kistna River, 62m. From Its Mouth, A Centre Of The Ancient Buddhist Kingdom Of Vengi, With A Famous Stupa (sepulchral Monument). Its Elaborate Carvings Illustrate The Life Of Buddha. Some ...

Amarillo
Amarillo, A City Of Texas, U.s.a., About 250m. W. Of Oklahoma City, At An Altitude Of 3,660f T. ; The County Seat Of Potter County. It Is On Federal Highways 66, 164, 366, 370 And 385 ; And Is Served By The Rock Island, The Colorado And Southern, And The ...

Amarna Tablets
Amarna Tablets, A Collection Of Clay Tablets With Cuneiform Inscriptions, A Poem, Letters And Other Documents, Dis Covered At El Amarna. These Inscriptions Have Materially Ad Vanced Our Knowledge Of The Languages And Legends Of Babylonia And Assyria. (see Cambridge Ancient History, Vol. I. 2nd Ed. 1924.) ...

Amaryllidaceae
Amaryllidaceae, The Amaryllis Family, A Numerous Group Of Monocotyledonous Plants, Closely Allied To The Lily Family (liliaceae). Familiar Representatives Are The Daffodil, Jonquil, Snowdrop, Snowflake And Tuberose (qq.v.). The Family Comprises About 90 Genera And 1,050 Species, Found Chiefly In Tropical And Subtropical Regions. Many Are Bulbous Plants Of Arid ...

Amaryllis
Amaryllis (the Name Of A Girl In Classical Pastoral Poetry), In Botany, A Genus Of The Family Amaryllidaceae, Contain Ing The Belladonna Lily (amaryllis Belladonna), A Native Of South Africa, Which Was Introduced Into Cultivation At The Beginning Of The 18th Century. This Is A Half-hardy Bulbous Plant, Producing In ...

Amasia
Amasia, The Chief Town Of The Amasia Vilayet Of Asia Minor And An Important Trade Centre On The Samsun-sivas Road, Beautifully Situated On The Yeshil Irmak (iris). Pop. (1927), 60,527, Including Many Kizilbash (shia) . It Was One Of The Chief Towns Of The Kingdom Of Trebizond And Of The ...

Amasis Or Amosis
Amasis Or Amosis (the Greek Forms Of The Egyptian Name Ahrnase, Ahmosi, "the Moon Is Born," Often Written Aahmes Or Ahmes In Modern Works), The Name Of Two Kings Of Ancient Egypt. ...

Amateur
Amateur, A Person Who Takes Part In Any Art, Craft, Game Or Sport For The Sake Of The Pleasure Afforded By The Occupation Itself And Not For Pecuniary Gain (lat. Amator, Lover). Being Thus A Person For Whom The Pursuit In Question Is A Recreation And Not A Business, And ...

Amathus
Amathus, Ancient City, Cyprus, On The South Coast, About 24m. W. Of Larnaka And 6m. E. Of Limassol, Among Sandy Hills And Sand-dunes, Which Perhaps Explains Its Name (greek Aµaoos, Sand). The Earliest Remains Hitherto Found On The Site Are Of The Early Iron Age (i000-600 B.c.). Amathus Maintained Strong ...

Amati
Amati, The Name Of A Family Of Italian Violin Makers, Who Flourished At Cremona From About 155o To 1692. According To Fetis, Andrea And Nicolo Amati, Two Brothers, Were The First Italians Who Made Violins. They Were Succeeded By Antonio And Geronimo, Sons Of Andrea. Another Nicolo, Son Of Geronimo, ...

Amatitlan Or San Juan
Amatitlan Or San Juan De Amatitlan, The Capital Of A Department Bearing The Same Name In Guatemala, On Lake Amatitlan, 15m. S.w. Of Guatemala City By The Trans Continental Railway From Puerto Barrios To San Jose. The Popu Lation In 192i Was 37,705. The Town Consists Almost Entirely Of One-storeyed ...

Amaurosis
Amaurosis, A Term For "deprivation Of Sight," Limited Chiefly To Those Forms Of Defect Or Loss Of Vision Which Are Caused By Diseases Not Directly Involving The Eye. ...

Amazon Stone Or
Amazon-stone Or Amazonite (named From The Amazon River, Its Supposed Locality), A Bright Green Variety Of Micro Cline Felspar (which See) Obtained From Miask In The Ilmen Mountains, Russia, And At Pikes Peak, Colorado, And In Mada Gascar. ...

Amazon The Mainriver
Amazon - The Main River Physical Characteristics.—theamazon Main River Is Navigable For Ocean Steamers As Far As Iquitos, 2,3oom. From The Sea, And 486m. Higher Up For Vessels Drawing 14f T. Of Water, As Far As Achual Point. Beyond That, According To Tucker, Confirmed By Wertheman, It Is Unsafe ; ...

Amazon Tributaries
Amazon - Tributaries The Tocantins Is Not Really A Branch Of The Amazon. It Is The Central Fluvial Artery Of Brazil, Running From South To North For A Distance Of About 1,50o Miles. It Rises In The Mountainous Dis Trict Of Pyrenopolis, But Its More Ambitious Western Affluent, The Araguay, ...

Amazon
Amazon, The Great River Of South America And The Largest In The World In Volume Although Exceeded In Length By The Mississippi—missouri. In The Year 1500, Vicente Yafiez Pinzon, In Command Of A Spanish Expedition, Discovered And Ascended The Amazon To A Point About So M. From The Sea. He ...

Amazonas
Amazonas, The Extreme North-western And Largest State Of Brazil, Bounded North By Colombia And Venezuela, East By The State Of Path, South By The State Of Matto Grosso And Bolivia, And West By Peru And Colombia. It Embraces An Area Df 731,363 Sq.m. Wholly Within The Amazon Basin. A Small ...

Amazonas_2
Amazonas, A Department Of Northern Peru', On The East Ern Slopes Of The Cordillera Between The Departments Of Loreto And Cajamarca, With Ecuador On The North (area, 13,947 Sq.m., Estimated Pop. 8o,000). The North-eastern Part Of The Territory Is A Low-lying Equatorial Virgin Forest Inhabited By Savage Tribes. The Southern ...

Amazonas_3
Amazonas, A Territory Belonging To Venezuela, And Occupy Ing The Extreme Southern Part Of That Republic, Adjoining The Bra Zilian State Of Amazonas. It Lies Partly Within The Drainage Basin Of The Orinoco And Partly Within That Of The Rio Negro, An Affluent Of The Amazon. The Territory Is Covered ...

Amazons
Amazons, A Legendary Nation Of Female Warriors, Said To Have Lived In Pontus Near The Shore Of The Euxine Sea, Where They Formed An Independent Kingdom Under The Government Of A Queen, The Capital Being Themiscyra On The Banks Of The River Thermodon (herodotus Iv. I '0-1'7). From This Centre ...

Ambarvalia
Ambarvalia, An Annual Festival Of The Ancient Romans, Occurring In May, Usually On The 29th, The Object Of Which Was To Secure The Growing Crops Against Harm. The Priests Were The Arval Brothers (q.v.), Who Conducted The Victims—ox, Sheep And Pig (suovetaurilia)—in Procession With Prayer To Ceres Round The Boundaries ...

Ambassador
Ambassador, A Public Minister Of The First Rank, Ac Credited And Sent By The Head Of A Sovereign State As His Personal Representative To Negotiate With A Foreign Government, And To Watch Over The Interests Of His Own Nation Abroad. The Power Thus Conferred Is Defined In The Credentials Or ...

Ambato Or Asiento De
Ambato Or Asiento De Ambato, An Inland Town Of Ecuador, Capital Of The Province Of Tunguragua, 8om. S. Of Quito By The Highway, And Near The Northern Foot Of Chimborazo. Pop. Estimate) 17,674. The Town Stands In A Bowl-like Depres Sion, 8,6o6f T. Above Sea-level, Surrounded By Steep, Sandy, Bar ...

Ambato
Ambato Is Also The Name Of A Range Of Mountains In Northern Argentina, Being A Spur Of The Sierra De Aconquija Crossing The Province Of Catamarca From North To South. ...

Amber
Amber, A Ruined City Of India, The Ancient Capital Of Jaipur State In The Rajputana Agency. The Name Of Amber Is First Men Tioned By Ptolemy. It Was Founded By The Minas And Was Still Flourishing In A.d. 967. In 1037 It Was Taken By The Rajputs, Who Held It ...

Amberg
Amberg, A Town In Bavaria, Formerly Capital Of The Upper Palatinate, On Both Sides Of The Vils, 42m. E. Of Nurnberg By Rail. Pop. (1933) 27,633. It Has Eleven Churches; St. Martin's (i Sth Century) Has Good Paintings And A Tower 300f T. High. A Former Jesuit Monastery Is Now ...

Ambergris
Ambergris, A Solid, Fatty, Inflammable Substance Of A Dull Grey Or Blackish Colour, The Shades Being Variegated Like Marble, Possessing A Peculiar Sweet, Earthy Odour. It Occurs As A Biliary Concretion In The Intestines Of The Spermaceti Whale (physeter Catodon), And Is Found Floating Upon The Sea, On The Sea ...

Amber_2
Amber, A Fossil Resin Much Used For The Manufacture Of Ornamental Objects. The Name Comes From The Arabian Anbar, Probably Through The Spanish, But This Word Originally Referred To Ambergris, Which Is An Animal Substance Quite Distinct From Yellow Amber. The Property Which Amber Possesses Of Acquiring Elec Trical Charge ...

Ambidexterity
Ambidexterity, The Ability To Use Both The Right And The Left Hand With Equal Ease (lat. Ambi Both, Dexter Right Handed). Educationalists And Physiologists Frequently Advocate The Cultivation Of Ambidexterity In Children On The Ground That The Brain-centres Controlling The Motor Functions Thereby Become More Highly Developed. Since, However, The ...

Ambient
Ambient (lat. Ambi, On Both Sides, Ire, To Go), Surround Ing; A Word Implying A Moving Rather Than A Stationary Encir Cling. It Is Used Mostly In The Phrase The "ambient Air." In Astrology It Means The Sky. ...

Ambigu
Ambigu, A French Game Of Cards In Which A Whist Pack With The Court Cards Omitted Is Used. It Is Composed Of The Char Acteristic Elements Of Whist, Bouillotte And Piquet. ...

Ambiguity
Ambiguity, In Law, Is Of Two Kinds, Patent And Latent. (i) Patent Ambiguity Is That Which Is Apparent On The Face Of An Instrument To Anyone Perusing It. In The Case Of A Patent Ambigu Ity Parol Evidence Is Admissible To Explain Only What Has Been Written, Not What It ...

Ambiorix
Ambiorix, Prince Of The Eburones, A Tribe Of Belgian Gaul. Although Caesar (q.v.) Had Freed Him From Paying Tribute To The Aduatuci, He Joined Catuvolcus (winter, 54 B.c.) In A Rising Against The Roman Forces Under Q. Titurius Sabinus And L. Aurunculeius Cotta, And Almost Annihilated Them. An Attack On ...

Ambleside
Ambleside, Urban District Of Westmorland, England, A Mile From The Head Of Lake Windermere. Population (1931) It Is Beautifully Situated Among The Bare Hills Surrounding The Richly Wooded Valley Of The Rothay. The Hills Are Wansfell On The East, Loughrigg Fell On The West, And Rydal Fell And The Ridge ...

Amblygonite
Amblygonite, A Mineral Usually Found As Cleavable, Compact Masses; It Is Translucent And Has A Vitreous Lustre, And The Colour Varies From White To Pale Shades Of Violet, Grey, Green Or Yellow. There Are Good Cleavages In Two Directions. The Min Eral Is Thus Not Unlike Felspar In General Appearance, ...

Amblypoda
Amblypoda, An Extinct Order Of Hoofed Mammals. They Inhabited North America, Europe And Asia During The Early Part Of The Tertiary Period And Were The Largest Quadrupeds Of Their Time. The Limbs And Feet Were Like Those Of Elephants, Long, Straight, Postlike Legs With Short, Rounded, Five-toed Feet, Small Hoofs ...

Ambo
Ambo, The Reading-desk Of The Early Christian Church, Orig Inally Movable, But By The 6th Century Established As An Important And Stationary Piece Of Great Decorative Value. From The I2th Century On, And Earlier Than That Outside Italy, The Ambo Was More And More Superseded By The Pulpit And Lectern, ...

Amboina
Amboina Is A Dutch Residency Of The Government Of The Moluccas, Area 198,367 Sq.km., And Is The Name Of The Capital And The Island On Which It Is Situated. Formerly A Separate Residency, In 1927 It Was United With Ternate Residency To Form The Govern Ment Of The Moluccas. Amboina ...

Amboise
Amboise, A Town Of France, Dept. Of Indre-et-loire, On The Left Bank Of The Loire, 12m. E. Of Tours By The Orleans Rail Way. Pop. 3,948. Its Famous Chateau Overlooks The Loire From The Rocky Plateau Above The Town. In The 11th Century Amboise Was A Lordship Under The Counts ...

Ambracia
Ambracia (more Correctly Ampracia), An Ancient Corin Thian Colony In Epirus About 7m. From The Ambracian Gulf, On The Navigable River Aracthus, In A Fertile Wooded Plain. It Was Founded Between 65o And 625 B.c. By Gorgus, Son Of The Corinthian Tyrant Cypselus. After Expulsion Of Gorgus's Son Periander Its ...

Ambridge
Ambridge, A Borough Of Beaver County, Pa., U.s.a., On The Ohio River And The Pennsylvania Railroad, 16 M. N.w. Of Pitts Burgh, Opposite To The Borough Of Woodlawn. It Lies On A Wide Plain, 7 5 5f T. Above Sea-level, And 7oft. Above The River. The Population In 1920 Was ...

Ambro Sia
Ambro Sia, In Ancient Mythology, Sometimes The Food, Sometimes The Drink, Of The Immortals. The Word Has Generally Been Derived From Gr. A, Not, And ,u(/3)paros, Mortal. A. W. Ver Rall, However, Denies That There Is Any Clear Example In Which The Greek Word Ambrosios Necessarily Means "immortal," And Ex ...

Ambrose The Camaldulian
Ambrose The Camaldulian, The Name By Which Ambrogio Traversari (1386-1439), Italian Humanist And Ecclesi Astic, Is Commonly Known. Ambrogio Was Born At Portico, Near Florence, And Studied Greek Under Emmanuel Chrysoloras. He Entered The Camaldulian Order At 14, And Became General Of The Order In 1431. His Great Work Was ...

Ambrose
Ambrose (c. Iigo), Norman Poet, Chronicler Of The Third Crusade And Author Of A Work Called L'estoire De La Guerre Sainte, Which Describes In Rhyming French Verse The Adventures Of Richard Coeur De Lion As A Crusader. The Poem Is Known To Us Only Through One Vatican Ms., And The ...

Ambrosian Chant
Ambrosian Chant, A General Term Applying To The Particular Type Of Liturgical Music Associated With The Name Of St. Ambrose, Bishop Of Milan, And Introduced By Him Into The Churches Of His Diocese. As To What It Amounted To Precisely Considerable Doubt Exists, But It Is Generally Agreed That St. ...

Ambrosians
Ambrosians, The Name Given To Several Religious Brotherhoods Which At Various Times Since The 14th Century Have Sprung Up In And Around Milan ; They Have About As Much Connection With St. Ambrose As The "jeromites" Who Were Found Chiefly In Upper Italy And Spain Have With Their Patron Saint. ...

Ambrosiaster
Ambrosiaster. A Commentary On St. Paul's Epistles, "brief In Words But Weighty In Matter," And Valuable For The Criticism Of The Latin Text Of The New Testament, Was Long Attributed To St. Ambrose. Erasmus In 1527 Threw Doubt On The Accuracy Of This Ascription, And The Author Is Usually Spoken ...

Ambrosius Aurelianus
Ambrosius Aurelianus, Leader Of The Britons Against The Saxons In The 5th Century, Was, According To The Legends Preserved In Gildas And The Historia Brittonum, . Of Roman Extraction. There Are Signs Of The Existence Of Two Parties In The National Opposition To The Invaders, But As Pascent, Son Of ...

Ambry
Ambry. An Ambry In Mediaeval Churches Was A Wall-niche Or Recess Near The Altar In Which The Sacred Vessels Were Kept. Large Churches And Cathedrals Had Numerous Ambries Fitted With Shelves And Richly Carved Doors, Where Consecrated Oils, Vest Ments, Holy Relics, Books Or Linen Were Stored. Occasionally An Ambry ...

Ambulance
Ambulance, A Term Applied In England And America To The Wagon Or Other Vehicle In Which The Wounded In Battle, Or Those Who Have Sustained Injuries In Civil Life, Are Conveyed To Hospital. More Strictly It Signifies A Hospital Establishment Moving With An Army In The Field, To Provide For ...

Ambulatory
Ambulatory, The Covered Passage Round A Cloister, Or The Aisle Or Procession Way Around The East End Of A Church Choir Behind The Altar. ...

Ambush
Ambush (older Form, "embush," O.fr. Embusche, From The Ital. Imboscata, In And Bosco, A Wood), The Hiding Of Troops, Primarily In A Wood, And So Any Concealment For The Purpose Of A Sudden Surprise Attack. ...

Amelie Les Bains
Amelie-les-bains, Watering Place, South-west France, In The Department Of Pyrenees-orientales, At The Junction Of The Mondony With The Tech. 281m. South-south-west Of Perpignan By Rail. Pop. (1931) 1,582. It Has Numerous Warm Sulphurous Springs And Both A Winter And Summer Season. There Are Two Bathing Establishments, One Of Which Preserves ...