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Encyclopedia Britannica Volume 2 Annu - Baltic

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Bakwe
Bakwe, A Vigorous, Fair-complexioned Folk Of Medium Stat Ure On The French Ivory Coast Between The Sassandra And Kavally Rivers. The Sub-tribes Ne, Houane, Pia, Abri, Pla And Ba Live On The Coast And Supply Crews Known As Krumen For European Vessels. The Bakwe Properly So-called, The Ba, And The ...

Bala
Bala, Market Town And Urban District Of Merionethshire, North Wales, Near The End Of Lake Bala, The Largest Natural Lake In W'h'ales, On The Tryweryn Just Above Its Confluence With The Dee. Population Of The Urban District (1931) 1,395. A Mound Known As Tomen-y-bala Is Thought To Be A Norman ...

Balaam
Balaam, A Prophet In The Bible. Balaam, The Son Of Beor, Was A Gentile Seer ; He Appears In The History Of The Israelites During Their Sojourn In The Plains Of Moab, East Of Jordan, At The Close Of The Forty Years' Wandering. Balak, King Of Moab, Alarmed By Their ...

Balaclava
Balaclava, A Village In The Crimea, East Of Sevastopol, Famous For A Battle In The Crimean War (q.v.). The Action Of Balaclava (oct. 25, 1854) Was Brought About By The Advance Of A Russian Field Army Under Gen. Liprandi Tc Attack The Allied English, French And Turkish Forces Besieging Sevastopol. ...

Balaena
Balaena, The Genus Of Whales To Which The Greenland Right Whale Belongs. See Cetacea. ...

Balaenoptera
Balaenoptera, The Generic Name Of The Group Of Whales Known As The Rorquals, Which Form The Main Object Of Pursuit In Modern Whale-fisheries. See Cetacea. ...

Balaghat
Balaghat, A District Of British India In The Nagpur Di Vision Of The Central Provinces, With An Area Of 3,557 Sq. M. The Administrative Headquarters Are At The Town Of Burha. It Forms The Eastern Portion Of The Central Plateau Which Divides The Prov Ince From East To West. These ...

Balalaika
Balalaika, A Stringed Instrument Very Popular In Russia Among The Peasants. It Has A Triangular Sound-board To Which Is Glued A Vaulted Back, Forming A Body Having A Triangular Base, Enabling It To Stand Upright. To The Body Is Added A Fretted Neck Strung With Two, Three Or Four Strings ...

Balance Of Power
Balance Of Power, In International Relations, Such A "just Equilibrium" Between Nations As Shall Prevent Any One Of Them Being In A Position To Dominate The Rest. The Principle Involved Is As Old As History, And Was Familiar To The Ancients Both As Theorists And Practical Statesmen (see E.g., Polybius, ...

Balance Of Trade
Balance Of Trade. This Term In Economics Belonged Originally To The Period When The "mercantile Theory" Prevailed, And It Is Still In Use, Though Not Quite Perhaps In The Same Way As At Its Origin, And The Term "balance Of Payments" Has Largely Taken Its Place. The "balance Of Trade" ...

Balance Sheets
Balance Sheets. A Balance Sheet Is A Summary Of The Balances Remaining In The Books Of A Business After Those Books Have Been Closed By Preparing And Completing A Proper Revenue Or Profit And Loss Account. If The Accounts Have Been Properly Pre Pared, The Vital Distinction Between Revenue Items ...

Balance
Balance, A Generic Term Designating Machines For Com Paring The Weights Of Two Bodies. This Article Deals Chiefly With The Equi-arm Type Treated Mainly As Instruments Of Precision. (see Also Weighing Machines.) Of All The Instruments Used In Making Precise Measurements, The Familiar Equi-arm Balance Is One Of The Most ...

Balanoglossus
Balanoglossus, The Name Given By The Neapolitan Naturalist, Delle Chiaje, To Certain Fragmentary Specimens Of A Marine Creature Brought To Him By A Fisherman About 182o. The Creature Would Be Termed By Any Ordinary Person A "worm" As It Is Soft Bodied, Without Legs Or Other Appendages And Burrows In ...

Balante
Balante, A Long-headed, Prognathous Patrilineal People Who File Their Incisor Teeth, Living In French Senegal And Portu Guese Guinea Between The Kasamansa And The Geba Rivers. Their Present Author And Others That The Proboscis And Collar Cavities Of Balanoglossus Are Represented In The Simplest Fish-like Animal Amphioxus And In The ...

Balash
Balash, Sassanian King In A.d. 484-488, Was The Brother And Successor Of Peroz, Who Had Died In A Battle Against The Hephthalites (white Huns), Who Invaded Persia From The East. He Put Down The Rebellion Of His Brother Zareh. After A Reign Of Four Years He Was Deposed And Blinded, ...

Balasore
Balasore, A Town And District Of British India, In The Orissa Division Of Behar And Orissa. The Town Is The Administra Tive Headquarters Of The District, And Is Situated On The Right Bank Of The River Burabalang, About 7m. From The Sea-coast As The Crow Flies And 16m. By The ...

Balata
Balata, A Valuable Raw Material, Resembling Gutta-percha And Used As A Substitute For It, Derived From The Latex Of The Bullet Tree (mimusops Balata) A Near Relative Of The Gutta-percha Tree. The Bullet Tree Is Native In The West Indies And South America And Is Abundant In Guiana. It Is ...

Balaton
Balaton, The Largest Lake Of Central And Western Europe, Situated In Western Hungary. About Som. In Length It Lies In A Narrow North-east To South-west Tectonic Rift Whose Origin Is Asso Ciated With The Alpine Uplift. The Depth Averages 6f T. And Attains A Maximum Of About 38f T. Near ...

Balayan
Balayan, A Municipality (with Administration Centre And 25 Barrios Or Districts) And Port Of Entry Of The Province Of Batangas, Luzon, Philippine Islands, Lying At The Head Of The Bay Of Balayan, About 55m. By Land S. By W. Of Manila And 79 By Water. Pop. (1918), 13,141, Of Whom ...

Balboa
Balboa, A Town, Panama Canal Zone, The Port Adjoining The City Of Panama. The Port Is About 3m. Distant From Panama City, And Contains All The Wharves And Docks, Panama Itself Not Being A Seaport. (see Panama Canal And Panama.) ...

Balbriggan
Balbriggan, Town, Co. Dublin, Ireland, 214m. N.n.e. Of Dublin By The Great Northern Railway. Pop. (1926) 2,278. The Harbour Affords A Good Refuge From The East Or South-east Gales. The Town Has Considerable Manufactures Of Cottons And Hosiery, "balbriggan Hose" Being Well Known. The Industry Was Founded By Baron Hamilton ...

Balbus
Balbus, Literally "stammerer," The Name Of Several Roman Families. Of The Acilii Balbi, One, Manius Acilius, Was Consul In 150 B.c., Another In 114. To Another Family Belonged T. Ampius Balbus, A Supporter Of Pompey; Afterwards Pardoned By Julius Caesar (cf. Cic. Ad Fam. Vi. 12 And Xiii. 7o). We ...

Balcony
Balcony, A Platform Enclosed By A Railing, And Projecting From The Wall Of A Building. In Theatres The Balcony, Originally A Stage Box, Is Now One Of The Upper Levels Of The Auditorium. ...

Bald Pate
Bald Pate, The Common Name For A North American Duck (anas, Or Mareca, Americana), Allied To The European Widgeon (q.v.). ...

Baldachino
Baldachino, Also Known As A Ciborium In Architec Ture, The Canopy Over An Altar Or Tomb, Supported On Columns, Especially When Free Standing And Disconnected From Any En Closing Wall. Early Examples Of The Baldachino Are Found In The Basilicae Of Ravenna And Rome. The Usual Form Consists Of Four ...

Balder
Balder, A Scandinavian God, The Son Of Odin. The Story Of His Death Is Given In Two Widely Different Forms, By Saxo In His Gesta Danorum (ed. Holder), And In The Prose Edda (gyl F Aginning). ...

Balderic
Balderic, The Name Given To The Author Of A Chronicle Of The Bishops Of Cambrai, Written In The Ii Th Century. This Gesta Episcoporum Cambracensium (first Printed In 1615) Was For Some Time Attributed To Balderic, Archbishop Of Noyon, But It Now Seems Tolerably Certain That The Author Was An ...

Baldness
Baldness (technically Alopecia), The Result Of Loss Of Hair, Particularly On The Human Scalp. Two Forms May Be Distin Guished : One The Premature Baldness Common In Young Men, Due To Alopecia Seborrhoeic, The Other Alopecia Areata, Now Regarded As An Epidemic Disease. Alopecia Seborrhoica Is Always Due To The ...

Baldric
Baldric, A Belt Worn Over One Shoulder, Passing Diagonally Across The Body And Under The Other Arm, Either As An Ornament Or A Support For A Sword, Bugle, Etc. ...

Baldwin I
Baldwin I. (1172-1205), Emperor Of Rumania, Count Of Flanders And Hainaut, Was One Of The Most Prominent Leaders Of The Fourth Crusade. On The Capture Of Constantinople He Was Elected First Emperor Of Rumania (may 9, 1204) And Crowned A Week Later, After The Imperial Crown Had First Been Refused ...

Baldwin Ii
Baldwin Ii. (1217-1273), Emperor Of Rumania, Was A Younger Son Of Yolande, Sister Of Baldwin I. Her Husband, Peter Of Courtenay, Was Third Emperor Of Rumania, And Had Been Followed By His Son Robert, Upon Whose Death In 1228 The Suc Cession Passed To Baldwin. The Barons Chose John Of ...

Baldwin Iii
Baldwin Iii., King Of Jerusalem (1143-1162), Was The Eldest Son Of Fulk Of Jerusalem By His Wife Melisinda. He Was Born In 113o, And Became King In 1143, Under The Regency Of His Mother, Which Lasted Till 1152. He Came To The Throne At A Time When The Attacks Of ...

Baldwin Ii_2
Baldwin Ii., Count Of Edessa (died 1131), King Of Jeru Salem (i I 18-3i), Originally Known As Baldwin De Burg, Was A Son Of Count Hugh Of Rethel, And A Nephew Of Godfrey Of Bouillon And Baldwin I. He Appears On The First Crusade At Constantinople As One Of Godfrey's ...

Baldwin Iv
Baldwin Iv., The Son Of Amalric I. By His First Wife Agnes, Ruled In Jerusalem From 1174 To 1183, When He Had His Nephew Baldwin Crowned In His Stead. Educated By William Of Tyre, Baldwin Iv. Came To The Throne At The Early Age Of 13 ; And Thus The ...

Baldwin I_2
Baldwin I. (1o58-1118), Prince Of Edessa, And First King Of Jerusalem (ilooi8), Was The Brother Of Godfrey Of Bouil Lon (q.v.). He Was Originally A Clerk In Orders, And Held Several Prebends; But In 1096 He Joined The First Crusade, And Accom Panied His Brother Godfrey As Far As Heraclea ...

Baldwin V
Baldwin V., The Son Of Sibylla (daughter Of Amalric I.) By Her First Husband, William Of Montferrat, Was The Nominal King Of Jerusalem From 1183 To 1186, Under The Regency Of Ray Mund Of Tripoli. His Reign Is Marked By The Advance Of Saladin And By Dissensions Between The Government ...

Bale I
Bale. (i) Evil, Suffering, A Word Obsolete Except In Poetry, And More Common In The Adjectival Form "baleful." In Early Poetry, Used In Antithesis To "bliss"; (2) A Bonfire, A Northern English Use More Common In "bale-fire"; (3) In Industry, A Bundle Or Package Of Material, Bound In Canvas With ...

Balearic Islands Baleares
Balearic Islands (baleares), An Archipelago Of Four Islands, With A Considerable Number Of Islets, In The Mediterranean, Off The East Coast Of Spain, Of Which Country It Forms A Province. Pop. (1930) 365,512; Area 1,937 Square Miles. The Archipelago, Which Lies Between 38 4o' And 4o 5' N., And I ...

Bali
Bali, An Island, East Of Java Across The Shallow Bali Strait, Only A Mile Wide At Its Narrowest; Length 93m., Extreme Width 5om., Area 2,095sq.m. With Lombok, It Forms A Residency With Two Divisions, Sing Aradja And South Bali. Mountainous, With Deep Ravines Southward, It Has A Large Allu Vial ...

Balikisri
Balikisri, A Town Of Asia Minor, Capital Of The Karasi Vilayet, Altitude 575ft., Situated On Rising Ground Above A Fertile Plain Which Drains To The Sea Of Marmora. Pop. (1927) 134,617. It Is A Centre Of Trade In Opium, Silk And Cereals, Communicating By Carriage Roads With Panderma. The Neighbourhood ...

Balint Balassa
Balassa, Balint, Baron Of Kekko And Gyarmat , Magyar Lyric Poet, Was Born At Kekko, And Educated By The Reformer, Peter Bornemissza, And By His Mother, The Highly Gifted Protestant Zealot, Anna Sulyok. He Died Of Wounds At The Siege Of Esztergom. Balassa's Poems Fall Into Four Divisions : Reli ...

Baliol
Baliol, The Name Of A Family Which Played An Important Part In The History Of Scotland. The Founder Of The Family In England Was A Norman Baron, Guy Or Guido De Baliol, Who Held The Fiefs Of Bailleul, Dampierre, Harcourt, And Vinoy In Nor Mandy. Coming To England With William ...

Balipara
Balipara, A Frontier Station And Tract Of British India To The North Of The Darrang District In Assam. The Creation Of The Balipara Frontier Tract Followed Murders By Abors And Ad Ministration Was Remodelled. An Eastern Section Was Formed At Sadiya And A Western Section At Balipara, To Which A ...

Baliuag
Baliuag, A Municipality (with Administration Centre And 17 Barrios Or Districts) Of The Province Of Bulacan, Luzon, Phil Ippine Islands, On The Quingua River, 29m. (by Rail) N.n.w. Of Manila. Pop. (1918), 18,254, Of Whom 8,892 Were Males (no Whites). Balivag Is Served By An Extension Of The Railway Between ...

Balkan Peninsula
Balkan Peninsula. Since The Early 19th Century This Name Has Been Given To The Most Easterly Of The Three South Ern Prolongations Of The European Continent. Balkan Is A Turk Ish Word Meaning Mountain, And Though In Modern Usage It Is Applied Only To A Particular Mountain Belt Lying South ...

Balkan Wars
Balkan Wars, This Article Gives An Account Of The Campaigns Of Bulgaria, Serbia, Greece And Montenegro, As Allies, Against Turkey, In 1912 And 1913, And Also Of The Brief Struggle That Followed Between The Former Allies, With Turkey And Rumania Intervening, In The Summer Of 1913. When War Broke Out, ...

Balkash
Balkash, A Lake Of Asiatic Russia, In The Kazak, A.s.s.r., Between The Provinces Of Semipalatinsk And Kurgai In To N. And 73 To 79 E., About I,000m. To The East Of Lake Aral. It Is Also Called In Kirghiz Ala-tenghiz, And In Chinese, Se-hai. It Has An Area Of Nearly ...

Balkh
Balkh (some Think Anc. Bactra Or Zariaspa), Afghan City, About Ioo M. E. Of Andkhui And Some 46 M. S. Of The Oxus, Sit Uated On The Right Bank Of The Balkh River, 1,200 Ft. Above The Sea. It Comprises About 50o Houses Of Afghan Settlers, A Colony Of Jews ...

Ball Bearings
Ball Bearings, Machine Bearings In Which Friction Is Lessened By Arranging Loose Steel Balls To Revolve In Channels Or Races. Sometimes The Balls Run Between Coned Surfaces. The Balls And Their Races Are Manufactured With Precision Of High Grade Hardened Steel. For Heavy Work, Rollers Are Sometimes Used Instead Of ...

Ball Flower
Ball-flower, An Architectural Ornament In The Form Of A Ball Inserted In The Cup Of A Flower, Which Came Into Use In The Latter Part Of The 13th, And Was In Great Vogue In The Early Part Of The 14th Century. It Is Generally Placed In Rows At Equal Distances ...

Ball
Ball. A Rounded Body, Hollow Or Solid, Preferably With A Smooth Surface, Sometimes Indented With An Even Pattern. (mid. Eng. Bal. Cf. Bale, Of Teutonic Origin. Lat. Follis. Gr. Iraxxa). Sometimes Applied To Such Rounded Protuberances As The Root Of The Thumb And Big Toe, Or As The "ball" Joint ...

Ballabile
Ballabile, A Musical Term, Now Seldom Used, Signifying That A Given Work, Or Section Of A Work, As In An Opera, Is Suitable For Dancing Purposes. From The Ital. Ballare, To Dance; And Liter Ally Therefore "danceable." ...

Ballad Opera
Ballad Opera, A Simple Type Of Opera Peculiar To Eng Land, Where It Had Its Origin In The 18th Century, The Story Being Usually In The Nature Of A Burlesque Or Extravaganza, While The Music, Confined Mainly To Detached Numbers Interspersed Among The Spoken Dialogue, Was Drawn From Pre-existing Popular ...

Ballad
Ballad, The Name Given To A Type Of Verse Of Unknown Authorship, Dealing With Episode Or Simple Motif Rather Than Sus Tained Theme, Written In A Stanzaic Form More Or Less Fixed And Suitable For Oral Transmission, And In Its Expression And Treatment Showing Little Or Nothing Of The Finesse ...

Ballade
Ballade, The Technical Name Of A Complicated And Fixed Form Of Verse, Arranged On A Precise System. An Earlier Form Of The Word "ballad," It Afterwards Came To Be Applied To An En Tirely Distinct Kind Of Verse. In Its Regular Condition A Ballade Consists Of Three Stanzas And An ...

Ballarat
Ballarat, A City Of Grenville County, Victoria, Australia, Consisting Of 3 Municipalities : Ballarat City, Ballarat East, Sebas Topol. It Lies At An Elevation Of 1,416 Ft. On The Plateau Which Here Forms The "great Divide." Close By, On The East, A Sharp Rise Leads Up A Further 500 Ft. ...

Ballast
Ballast, In Shipping, Heavy Material, Such As Gravel, Stone Or Metal, Placed In The Hold Of A Vessel In Order To Immerse Her Sufficiently To Give Adequate Stability. In Botany "ballast-plants" Are So Called Because They Have Been Introduced Into Countries In Which They Are Not Indigenous Through Their Seeds ...

Ballater
Ballater (gaelic For "the Town On A Sloping Hill"), Village And Police Burgh, Parish Of Glenmuick, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, 67oft. Above Sea, On The Left Bank Of The Dee, Here Crossed By A Fine Bridge, 431m. By Rail W. By S. Of Aberdeen. Pop. 1,198. It Is The Terminus Of The ...

Ballet
Ballet, A Performance In Which Dancing, Music And Pan Tomime Are Involved. The Present Acceptation Of The Word Ballet Is A Theatrical Representation In Which A Story Is Told Only By Gesture, Accompanied By Music. This Variety Of Theatrical Representation By Means Of Dancing, Mimicry And Orchestral Music, Had Its ...

Ballia
Ballia, A Town And District Of British India, In The Benares Division Of The United Provinces. The Town Is On The Left Bank Of The Ganges, Below The Confluence Of The Lesser Sarju. It Is Really An Aggregation Of Rural Villages. Pop. (1931) , The District Of Ballia, Constituted In ...

Ballina
Ballina, Urban District, Co. Mayo, Ireland, On The River Moy, And On The Killala Branch Of The Great Southern Railway. Pop. (1926), 4,872. In The Suburb Of Ardnaree Is The Roman Catholic Cathedral (diocese Of Killala), With An East Window Of Munich Glass, And The Ruins Of An Augustinian Abbey ...

Ballinasloe
Ballinasloe, Town, Co. Galway, Ireland, 91m. W. Of Dublin, On The Great Southern Ry. Pop. Of Urban District (1926) The Town Contains Remains Of A Castle Of Elizabethan Date. Industries Include Brewing, Flour-milling, Tanning, Hat Making And Carriage-building. Trade Is Assisted By Water-com Munication Through The Grand Canal To The ...

Ballistic Galvanometer
Ballistic Galvanometer, A Galvanometer (q.v.) With A Small Damping Factor And Therefore A Long Period Of Oscillation. ...

Ballistics
Ballistics. Ballistics Is A Branch Of Applied Physics Which Deals With The Motion Of Projectiles. Its Chief Application Is To Artillery Projectiles And Rifle Bullets, Though Latterly A New Application Has Been Found In Aerial Bombs. There Are Two Branches Of The Subject; One Deals With The Motion Of The ...

Balloon
Balloon, A Bag Of Impermeable Material Which, When In Flated With Gas Lighter Than Air, Rises From The Ground. ...

Balloons In War
Balloons In War. The French Were Probably The First To Recognize The Value Of Balloons For War Purposes, A Special Study Being Given To The Subject During The French Revolutionary Wars. Reconnoitring Balloons Were Subsequently Used In The French Campaign In Italy In 1859. During The Siege Of Paris (187o-71) ...

Ballston Spa
Ballston Spa, A Village Of New York, U.s.a., 7m. S. Of Saratoga Springs, On The Main Line Of The Delaware And Hud Son Railroad; The County-seat Of Saratoga County. The Population In 193o Was 4,591. Ballston Spa Has Long Been A Health Resort. It Lies Among The Foothills Of The ...

Ballycastle
Ballycastle, Urban District, Co. Antrim, Northern Ire Land, On A Bay Of The Same Name Opposite Rathlin Island. Pop. (1926) 1,986. It Is Connected With The Northern Counties (mid Land) Railway At Ballymoney By The Ballycastle Light Railway. The Town Consists Of Two Divisions, About A Quarter Of A Mile ...

Ballymena
Ballymena, A Town In Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland, On The Small River Braid An Affluent Of The Maine, 2m. Above Their Junction. Pop. Of Urban District (1926), 11,873. It Is 33m. N.n.w. Of Belfast On The Northern Counties (midland) Railway. Branch Lines Run To Larne And Parkmore On The East ...

Ballymoney
Ballymoney, Town, Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland, 53m. N.n.w. From Belfast And A Junction On The Northern Counties (midland) Railway. Pop. Of Urban District (1926), 3,168. The Trade Includes Brewing, Distilling And Tanning, Besides The Linen Manufacture Common To The Whole County. Soap, Candles And Tobacco Are Also Manufactured, And The ...

Ballymote
Ballymote, Town, Co. Sligo, Ireland, 14m. S. Of Sligo By The Great Southern Ry. Pop. (1926), 75o. It Has Some Agricul Tural Trade And Carriage-building Works. There Are Remains Of A Castle, Built By Richard De Burgh, In 130o, And The Scene Of Hostil Ities In 1641 And 1652; And ...

Ballyshannon
Ballyshannon, Town, Co. Donegal, Ireland, At The Mouth Of The Erne ; On The Bundoran Branch Of The Great North Ern Railway. Pop. (1926) 2,112. The River Is Here Crossed By A Bridge Which Connects The Town With The Suburb Of The Port. Below The Bridge The River Forms A ...

Balm
Balm, A Fragrant Herb, Melissa Officinalis, Of The Deadnettle Family (labiatae) With Opposite, Ovate, Crenulated Leaves, Which Are Wrinkled Above, And Small White Or Rose-spotted Flowers. It Is A Native Of Central And Southern Europe ; It Is Often Grown In Gardens And Has Become Naturalized In The South Of ...

Balmain
Balmain, A Town Of Cumberland County, N.s.w., Australia, On The Western Shore Of Darling Harbour, Port Jackson, 2 M. By Water From Sydney And Suburban To It. Pop. (1933) 28,268. Saw Mills, Iron Foundries, Chemicals, Glass And Soap Works, Shipbuild Ing Yards And A Coconut-oil Factory In Connection With The ...

Balmoral Castle
Balmoral Castle (gaelic, "the Majestic Dwelling"), Private Residence Of The British Sovereign, Parish Of Crathie And Braemar, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, On The Right Bank Of The Dee (here Spanned By A Fine Suspension Bridge), 8m. W. Of Ballater And At A Height Of Goof T. Above The Sea. It Was Sold ...

Balneotherapeutics
Balneotherapeutics, Medical Treatment By Internal And External Use Of Mineral Waters, The Principal Constituents Of Which Are Sodium, Magnesium, Calcium And Iron, In The Form Of Chlorides, Sulphates, Sulphides And Carbonates. Other Substances Occasionally Present Are Arsenic, Lithium, Potassium, Manganese, Bromine, Iodine, Etc. The Chief Gases In Soiution Are Oxygen, ...

Balochi Language
Balochi Language, The Speech Of The Baloches Of Baluchistan, Is Older Than Old Persian, The Court Language Of The Achaemenides, As Shown By The Close Relationship Between It And The Language Of The Avesta. It Is Not A Bastard Persian Dia Lect. It Has Borrowed And Is Still Borrowing Numerous ...

Balquhidder
Balquhidder (gaelic, "the Farm In The Back-lying Country"), Village And Parish, Perthshire, Scotland. Pop. Of Parish (1931) 619. The Village Lies 3m W. Of The Station Of The Same Name On The L.m.s. Railway From Callander To Oban, And 27gm. N.w. Of Stirling, At The East End Of Loch Voil. ...

Balrampur
Balrampur, A Town Of British India Near The River Rapti, In The Gonda District Of The United Provinces. Pop. (1931) 19,311. It Gives Its Name To One Of The Largest Talukdari Estates In The Province. The Then Rajah Sir Drigbijai Singh, K.c.s.i., Was Conspicuously Loyal During The Mutiny, And Was ...

Balsa
Balsa, The Name Given To A Tree (ochroma Lagopus) Of The Bombax Family (bombaceae), Called Also Corkwood, Native To Tropical South America, And Noted For Its Exceedingly Light Wood (span. Balsa, A Raft Or Float). In Appearance The Tree Is Somewhat Like The North American Cottonwood (populus Deltoides), While The ...

Balsam
Balsam, A Term Properly Limited To Such Resins Or Oleo-resins As Contain Benzoic Acid Or Cinnamic Acid Or Both. Those Balsams Which Conform To This Definition Make Up A Distinct Class, Allied By Their Composition, Properties, And Uses. Those Found In Com Merce Are The Balsam Of Peru, Balsam Of ...

Balta
Balta, The Chief Town Of The Autonomous Moldavian S.s.r. Lat. 55' N., Long. 29 35' E. Pop. (1926) 21,374. It Is Linked By Road And Rail With Odessa And Kiev And Has Annual Fairs, Mainly Dealing In Cattle, Horses, Grain And Hide. It Has Tallow-melting, Soap Boiling, Tile-making And Brewing ...

Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea, A Sea Extending Between S4 And 66 N. Lat. And 9 And 3o E. Long. Surrounded By Sweden, Denmark, Ger Many, Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Russia And Finland (german Ostsee; Russ. Baltiyskoe More). The Main Axis Runs Approximately South-west To North-east And The Distance From Kiel To Haparanda ...

Bartholomew Badlesmere
Badlesmere, Bartholomew, Baron (i 275 1322) , English Nobleman, Was The Son And Heir Of Gunselm De Badlesmere (d. 1301), And Fought In The English Army Both In France And Scotland During The Later Years Of The Reign Of Edward I. In 1307 He Became Governor Of Bristol Castle, And ...

Bartolommeo Bagnacavallo
Bagnacavallo, Bartolommeo Italian Painter. His Real Name Was Ramenghi, But He Received The Cognomen Bagnacavallo From The Little Village Where He Was Born. He Studied Under Francia, And Then In Rome As A Pupil. Of Raphael For Whom He Worked, With Others, At The Decoration Of The Gallery In The ...

Baruch Iv
Baruch. ...

Battle Of Arausio
Arausio, Battle Of. From 202 B.c., When The Battle Of Zama "gave The World To Rome," The Tide Of Roman Expan Sion Rolled Onwards Without Serious Check Or Menace For Nearly A Century. Then, However, A Thunder-cloud Gathered Beyond The Alps Which Sent A Shiver Of Fear Through Italy. It ...

Battle Of Arras
Arras, Battle Of. The Great Battles Which Opened The Campaign Of The Allies In 1917 On The Western Front Were The Direct Outcome Of Two Main Causes; The First Was The Strategical Position Resulting From The Battle Of The Aisne In 1914, And The Second The Tactical Position Resulting From ...

Battle Of Asiago
Asiago, Battle Of, 1916. The Asiago Plateau Was The Scene Of Various Battles On The Italian Front During The World War (q.v.) ; But The More Distinctive Name Of The Battle Of Asiago Was Given To The Fighting Which Took Place On The Trentino Front During The Austrian Offensive Of ...

Battle Of Atbara
Atbara, Battle Of, April 8, 1898. (see Egypt And Sudan, Campaigns In, 1882-99.) ...

Battles Round Atlanta
Atlanta, Battles Round. The Fighting Round Atlanta (july 20-sept. 2, 1864), The Last Phase Of The Atlanta Campaign (may-sept.), Ended With Sherman, The Federal General, Forcing His Opponent Hood To Evacuate "the Gate City Of The South." Having Manoeuvred Hood's Predecessor, J. E. Johnston, Across The Chattahoochee (july 9), Sherman ...

Belles Lettres
Belles-lettres The Growing Refinement Of Social Life In The 8th And 9th Cen Turies Is Reflected In The Rise Of A Prose Literature Intended To Entertain The Reading Public, Supply The Elements Of Polite Edu Cation (adab), And Convey Moral Instruction In A Palatable Form. The Earliest Books Of This ...

Benedict Arnold
Arnold, Benedict (1741-1801), American Soldier, Was Born In Norwich, Conn., On Jan. 14, 1741. He Was The Great Grandson Of Benedict Arnold (1615-78), Thrice Colonial Governor Of Rhode Island Between 1663 And 1678; And Was The Fourth In Direct Descent To Bear The Name. He Received A Fair Education But ...

Benito Arias Montano
Arias Montano, Benito (1527-98), Spanish Orien Talist And Editor Of The Antwerp Polyglot, Was Born At Frejenal De La Sierra, In Estremadura. In 1562 He Was Appointed Consulting Theologian To The Council Of Trent. He Retired To Pena De Aracena In 1564, Wrote His Commentary On The Minor Prophets (1571), ...

Bering Sea Arbitration
Bering Sea Arbitration And "alabama" Arbitration.) Arbitral Tribunals May Have To Deal With Questions Either Of Law Or Fact, Or Of Both. When They Have To Deal With Law Only, That Is To Say, To Lay Down A Principle Or Decide A Question Of Liability, Their Functions Are Judicial Or ...

Bernardino Baldi
Baldi, Bernardino (1533-1617), Italian Mathema Tician And Miscellaneous Writer, Was Born At Urbino And Was Abbot Of Guastalla For 25 Years. He Is Said To Have Written Loo Different Works, The Chief Part Of Which Have Remained Unpub Lished. He Was A Theologian, Mathematician, Geographer, Anti Quary, Historian And Poet. ...

Berthold Auerbach
Auerbach, Berthold (1812-1882), German Novel Ist, Whose Fame Rests On His Tales Of Village Life, Was Born On Feb. 28 1812, At Nordstetten In The Black Forest, And Died At Cannes On Feb. 8 1882. He Was Educated At Tubingen, Munich And Heidelberg, And Studied Philosophy Under Strauss And Schel ...

Bion Joseph Arnold
Arnold, Bion Joseph (1861 ), American Elec Trical Engineer, Was Born At Casanovia, Near Grand Rapids, Mich., On Aug. 14, 1861. He Studied At The University Of Nebraska In 1879-80, Graduated From Hillsdale College, Hillsdale, Mich., In 1884, And Did Graduate Work At Cornell University In 1888-89. Establishing Himself In ...

Bohemia Poland
Poland, Bohemia, Croatia, Etc.). ...

Bronze Age
Bronze Age The Bronze Age Is The Name Commonly Applied To That Stage Of Human Culture During Which The Alloying Of Copper With Tin In Regular Proportions Became A Widespread Practice, And The Mate Rial Thus Obtained Was Used For Tools And Weapons As A Supple Ment To Or A ...