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Encyclopedia Britannica Volume 3 Baltimore - Braila

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Bay Islands
Bay Islands, A Group Of Small Islands In The Caribbean Sea Off The North Coast Of Honduras, Now A Part Of The National Territory Of Honduras But For A Time (1852-59) Under The British Flag. The Total Population Is (1930) 5,48o, Of Whom 3,34o Live In The Town Of Roatan ...

Bay Leaf
Bay Leaf, The Leaf Of The Sweet Bay Tree, A Species Of Laurel (laurus Nobilis) Which Grows In Mediterranean Countries. The Dried Leaves Are Used As A Condiment For Flavouring Many Fish And Meat Dishes. The Peculiar Flavour Of Bay Leaves Is Especially Prized For Seasoning Thin Soups And Broths. ...

Bay Of Bengal
Bengal, Bay Of, Part Of The Indian Ocean, Lying Be Tween Peninsular India And Burma. The Ioo-fathom Line Runs Parallel To The Coromandel Coast Some Som. Away, And Encloses The Andaman And Nicobar Islands, Submerged Continuations Of The Arakan Ranges, On The East. Opposite The Mouth Of The Ganges The ...

Bay Of Biscay
Biscay, Bay Of (fr. Golfe De Gascogne; Sp. Golfo De Vizcaya), An Inlet Of The Atlantic Ocean; Bounded On The East And North-east By France, And On The South By Spain. It Was Called By The Romans Sinus Aquitanicus, Sinus Cantabricus Or Cantaber Oceanus, Whence The Term Cantabrian Sea. The ...

Bay Rum Tree
Bay-rum Tree, A Small Aromatic Tree (pimenta Acris) Of The Myrtle Family (myrtaceae), Native To The West Closely Related To The Allspice And The Clove (qq.v.). From The Leathery Leaves, Sometimes Sin. Long, Is Distilled Bay Oil Or Oil Of Myrcia Used In Making Bay Rum (q.v.). In Jamaica The ...

Bay Rum
Bay Rum, A Fragrant Liquid Cosmetic Widely Used By Hair Dressers. It Is Composed Of Oil Of Bay, Called Also Oil Of Myrcia, To Which Has Been Added Alcohol, Water, Oil Of Orange Peel And Oil Of Pimenta. Bay Rum Is One Of The Chief Articles Exported From The Virgin ...

Bay
Bay, An Architectural Term For Any Division Of A Building, Be Tween Vertical Lines Or Planes, Especially The Entire Space Included Between Two Adjacent Supports; Thus The Space From Pier To Pier In A Church, Including That Part Of The Vaulting Or Ceiling Between Them, Is Known As A Bay. ...

Bayamo
Bayamo, An Old Inland City On The North Slope Of The Sierra Maestra In Santiago Province, Cuba. Pop. (1919) 4,102. It Lies On A Plain By The Bayamo River, In A Fertile Country, But Isolated From Sea And From Railway. Its Older Parts Are Extraordinarily Irregular. The Streets Are Of ...

Bayamon
Bayamon, An Interior Town In Porto Rico. The Population Of The Town Itself Was Io,411 By The Census Of 1920 And 12,986 In 193o. The Population Of The Municipal District In 193o Was The Town Is Situated In A Beautiful And Fertile Valley About I2m. From San Juan, The Capital ...

Bayazid
Bayazid, A Border Fortress Of Asiatic Turkey, Chief Town Of A Vilayet Of The Same Name, Situated Close To The Frontiers Of Russia And Persia, And Looking Across A Marshy Plain To The Great Cone Of Ararat, At A General Altitude Of 6,000 Feet. It Occupies A Site Of Great ...

Baybay
Baybay, A Municipality (with Administration Centre And 3' Barrios Or Districts) Of The Province And Island Of Leyte, Philippine Islands, On The West Coast At The Mouth Of The Pagban Ganan River, 45m. S.s.w. Of Tacloban, The Provincial Capital. Pop. (1918), 36,917, Of Whom 19,139 Were Males And One Was ...

Bayeux
Bayeux, Town Of France, Capital Of An Arrondissement In The Department Of Calvados, 18m. N.w. Of Caen. Pop. 6,551. It Is Situated On The Aure, Five Miles From The English Channel. Bayeux, The Augustodurum Of The Romans, Afterwards Civitas Baiocassium, Had A Bishopric From The Late 4th Century. Taken In ...

Bayezid I
Bayezid I. (1347-1403), Ottoman Sultan, Surnamed Yilderim Or "lightning," From The Great Rapidity Of His Move Ments, Succeeded His Father, 1e1urad I., On The Latter's Assassina Tion On The Field Of Kossovo, 1389, And Signalized His Accession By Ordering At Once The Execution Of His Brother Yakub, Who Had Dis ...

Bayezid Ii
Bayezid Ii. Sultan Of Turkey, Was The Son Of Mohammed Ii., Whom He Succeeded In 1481. Before He Could Establish Himself On The Throne A Long Struggle Ensued With His Brother Prince ) Em And He Succeeded Only After Pacifying The Janissaries With A Large Placebo. Being Routed, Jem Fled ...

Baylo
Baylo, In Diplomacy, The Title Borne By The Venetian Repre Sentative At Constantinople. His Functions Were Originally In The Nature Of Those Of A Consul-general, But From The I6th Century On Wards He Had Also The Rank And Functions Of A Diplomatic Agent Of The First Class. (see Diplomacy.) ...

Bayonet
Bayonet, A Short Thrusting Weapon, Fixed To The Muzzle Or Fore-end Of A Rifle Or Musket And Carried By Troops Armed With The Latter Weapons. The Origin Of The Word Is Disputed, But There Is Some Authority For The Supposition That The Name Is Derived From The Town Of Bayonne, ...

Bayonne
Bayonne, Town Of France, Capital Of An Arrondissement In The Department Of Basses-pyrenees, 66m. W.n.w. Of Pau On The Southern Railway. Pop. (1931), 2 7,2i 5. A First-class Fortified Place, It Is Situated At The Confluence Of Adour And Nive, About 31m. From The Sea. In The 3rd Century Bayonne ...

Bayonne_2
Bayonne, A City Of Hudson County, N.j., U.s.a., Occupy Ing The Long, Narrow Peninsula (4sq.m.) Between New York And Newark Bays, Immediately South Of Jersey City, And Separated From Staten Island By The Narrow Kill Van Kull. It Is On The Main Line Of The Central Railroad Of New Jersey, ...

Bayou
Bayou (bi'oo), A Marshy Offshoot Of A River. The Term Is Used Chiefly In The Southern United States For An "ox-bow" Lake Left Behind By A River That Has Abandoned Its Old Channel In The Lower Stages Of Its Course. Good Examples Are Found In The Lower Mississippi Valley. In ...

Bayreuth
Bayreuth, A Town In The District Of Upper Franconia, Bavaria, Germany, 58m. By Rail N.e. Of Nurnberg. Pop. (1933 ) 36,892. Bayreuth Was Formerly The Capital Of An Independent Principality, Annexed In 1791 To The Kingdom Of Prussia. In 1807 It Was Ceded To France; And In 18 I O ...

Baza
Baza, A Town Of Southern Spain, In The Province Of Granada. Pop. The Town Overlooks A Fertile Vega Belonging To The Hoya De Baza, One Of The Largest Of The Structural Basins Of Upper Andalusia. The Ancient Collegiate Church Of San Maximo Occupies The Traditional Site Of A Cathedral Founded ...

Bazaar
Bazaar, A Permanent Market Or Street Of Shops, Or A Group Of Short Narrow Streets Of Stalls Under One Roof (pers. Bazar, Mar Ket). The Word Has Spread Westward Into Arabic, Turkish And European Languages, And Eastward It Has Invaded India, Where It Has Been Generally Adopted. In Southern India ...

Bazas
Bazas, Town In The Dept. Of Gironde, France, 381m. S.s.e. Of Bordeaux. It Was The Capital Of The V Asates, And The Romans Made It One Of The 12 Cities Of Novempopulana. It Had A Bishop At Least From The 6th Century To 179o, And Was The Chief Town Of ...

Bazigars
Bazigars, A Nomad Gipsy-folk Of India, Found Throughout The Peninsula, And Variously Known As Bazigars, Panchpiri, Nats, Bediyas, Etc. The Bazigar Is Usually A Mohammedan, The Nat A Hindu. They Make A Living As Jugglers, Dancers, Basket-weavers And Fortune-tellers; And In True European Gipsy Fashion Each Clan Has Its King. ...

Bdellium
Bdellium, A Name Applied To Several Resins Derived From Species Of Commiphora. The Word (38 Xxwv Is Used By Pliny And Dioscorides As The Name Of A Plant Exuding A Fragrant Gum. Bdellium Is Similar To True Myrrh (q.v.) And Is Sometimes Found As An Adulterant Of It. ...

Beach Pea
Beach Pea (lathyrus Maritimus), A Characteristic Beach Plant Of Northern Regions. It Is A Perennial Herb Of The Family Leguminosae Native To Cool Sandy Shores Throughout The Northern Hemisphere And Extending Northward To The Arctic Sea. It Is Found On The Coasts Of The British Isles And On Those Of ...

Beach Wormwood
Beach Wormwood (artemisia Stelleriana), A Perennial Plant Of The Family Compositae, Native To North-eastern Asia, Now Naturalized In North America On Sandy Sea Beaches From Quebec To Delaware And Also On The Coasts Of Sweden. It Is A Densely White-woolly Plant, With Foliage Very Similar To That Of The Dusty ...

Beach
Beach, A Word Of Unknown Origin; Probably An Old Dialect Word Meaning Shingle, Hence The Place Covered By Shingle. Beach Sometimes Denotes Material Thrown Up By Waves, Sometimes The Long Resulting Ridge—though This Generally Has The Special Term Of "storm Beach"—but Usually Denotes The Area Between High And Low Water, ...

Beachcomber
Beachcomber, A Settler On The Coast Of The Pacific Or Its Islands Who Haunts The Wharves Of Harbours And Makes A Live Lihood Chiefly By Pilfering From Ships. ...

Beachy Head
Beachy Head, Promontory, Sussex, England, South-west Of Eastbourne, About 3m. From Centre Of The Town. It Is A Per Pendicular Chalk Cliff 532ft. High, And Forms The East End Of The South Downs. The Old Bell Tout Lighthouse, 285f T. Above High Water Mark, Erected In 1831 On The Second ...

Beacon
Beacon, A City Of Dutchess County, N.y., U.s.a., Pleasantly Situated On The East Bank Of The Hudson, Opposite Newburgh, About 5om. N. Of New York City. It Is Served By The New York Central And The Central New England Railways And By River Boats. The Population Was 10,996 In 1920, ...

Beaconsfield
Beaconsfield, Urban District, South Buckinghamshire, England. Pop. It Lies Just Off The Chalk Of The Chilterns, In A Hilly District Above The Valley Of The Small River Wye, A Tributary Of The Thames, Giving Access To High Wycombe And Thus To North Bucks And Oxfordshire. It Grew As A Posting ...

Beaconsfield_2
Beaconsfield, A Town In South Africa. It Is Situated At An Elevation Of 3, 79of T. Pop. (1918) 3,445 Whites, 16,919 Natives And Coloured. The Town Was Founded In 187o Near The Famous Du Toit's Pan Diamond Mine. It Gradually Became Practically A Suburb Of Kimberley, And Was Officially United ...

Beaconsfield_3
Beaconsfield, A Town Of Devon County, Tasmania, On The River Tamar. Pop. 3,533. It Is The Centre Of The Most Important Gold-field In The Island. ...

Beacon_2
Beacon, A Conspicuous Object, Either Natural Or Artificial, Visible As A Mark From A Distance By Day And, If Lighted (e.g., A Lighthouse), At Night. More Particularly It Is A Fixed Mark Of Dis Tinctive Construction Provided To Assist The Mariner, By Day, In Identifying His Position And Fixing His ...

Bead Manufacture
Bead Manufacture. A Bead Is A Small Globule Or Ball Used In Necklaces, Etc., And Made Of A Great Variety Of Materials. Beads Have Been Made From Remote Antiquity, And Are Found In Early Egyptian Tombs; Variegated Glass Beads, Found In The Ground In Certain Parts Of Africa, As Ashantiland, ...

Beadle
Beadle, Also Bedel Or Bedell, Originally A Subor Dinate Officer Of A Court Or Deliberative Assembly, Who Summoned Persons To Appear And Answer Charges Against Them (see Du Cange, Supra Tit. Bedelli). As Such, The Beadle Goes Back To Early Teutonic Times; He Was Probably Attached To The Moot As ...

Beads
Beads. The Word Bead Is Derived From The Saxon Verb "bid Dan," To Pray ; Originally Associated With The "beads" On A Ro Sary, It Has Now Been Extended To Mean Almost Any Pierced Object Which Can Be Strung. Their Great Diversity Of Form, Portability And Lasting Power Make Beads ...

Beadsman Or Bedesman
Beadsman Or Bedesman, A Pensioner Whose Duty It Was To Pray For His Benefactor (m.e. Betk, Prayer). In Scotland There Were Public Almsmen Supported By The King And Expected In Return To Pray For His Welfare. They Wore Long Blue Gowns With A Pewter Badge On The Right Arm, And ...

Beak Head
Beak-head, In Architecture, An Ornament Consisting Of The Top Of A Bird's Head With Its Beak, Or Any Similar Form, Used By The Norman Romanesque Builders, Especially In England, For The Decoration Of Arch Mouldings. ...

Beak
Beak, The Horny Bill Of A Bird, And So Used Of The Horny Ends Of The Mandibles Of The Octopus, The Duck-billed Platypus And Other Animals; Hence The Rostrum (q.v.) Or Ornamented Prow Of Ancient War Vessels. The Term Is Also Applied, In Classic Architec Ture, To The Pendent Fillet ...

Beaker
Beaker, A Large, Wide-mouthed Drinking-cup, Supported On A Flaring Base Or Foot ; Also, A Deep Vessel Of Glass, With A Project Ing Lip, Used In Laboratories. The Beaker, Used As A Drinking-ves Sel, Was Perhaps More Popular In The 16th Century Than At Any Other Period. Various Designs In ...

Beam
Beam, A Solid Piece Of Timber, As A Beam Of A House, Of A Plough, A Loom, Or A Balance (o.e. Beam, Cf. Ger. Baum, A Tree, To Which Sense May Be Referred The Use Of "beam" As Meaning The Rood Or Crucifix, And The Survival In Certain Names Of ...

Bean Feast
Bean-feast, An Annual Dinner Given By An Employer To His Workpeople, And Thus, Colloquially, Any Jollification. The Most Probable Theory Connects The Phrase With A Feast On Twelfth Night, At Which A Cake With A Bean Buried In It Was A Great Fea Ture. The Bean-king Was He Who Had ...

Bean
Bean, The Seed Of Certain Leguminous Plants Cultivated For Food All Over The World, And Furnished Chiefly By The Genera Vicia, Phaseolus, Dolichos And Glycine. The Common Or Broad Bean, In All Its Varieties, As Cultivated In Great Britain And On The Conti Nent Of Europe, Is The Produce Of ...

Bear Baiting
Bear-baiting And Bull-baiting, Sports Formerly Very Popular In England But Now Suppressed On Account Of Their Cruelty. They Took Place In Arenas Built In The Form Of Theatres Which Were The Common Resort Even Of Cultivated People. In The Bear-gardens, Which Are Known To Have Existed Since The Time Of ...

Bear Mountain Bridge Route
Bear Mountain Bridge Route Connects New England With The West Across The Hudson River Just Be Low The U.s. Military Academy At West Point Where The River Narrows In Passing Through Deep Mountain Cuts. The Approach Along Storm King Highway Af Fords Magnificent Views Of The Hudson River. ...

Bear Mountain Bridge
Bear Mountain Bridge Crosses The Hudson River About 44m. Above New York City. It Is A Highway Toll Bridge, With A Deck Accommodating Four Lines Of Vehicles And Two Sidewalks. The Floor System Was Designed For 15 Ton And 20 Ton Motor Trucks, With Impact Allowance. Opened To Public Use ...

Bear
Bear, Originally The European Brown Bear (ursus Arctus), But Extended To Include All Members Of The Family Ursidae (see Carnivora). Bears Are Characterized By Their Massive Bodies, Short Limbs And Very Short Tails ; They Are Omnivorous And Are Particularly Fond Of Honey ; The Grizzly Bear (u. Horribilis) And ...

Bearberry
Bearberry (arctostaphylos Uva-ursi), A Small Shrub Of The Heath Family, Ericaceae (q.v.), Native To Dry, Sandy Or Rocky Soil And Very Widely Distributed In High Northern Regions. In The British Isles It Grows On Stony Alpine Heaths; In North America It Is Found On Rocks And Bare Hills From Labrador ...

Beard
Beard, In Modern Usage, Applies To The Hair Grown Upon A Man's Chin And Cheek. When The Chin Is Shaven, What Remains Upon The Cheeks Is Called Whiskers. "moustache" Or "moustaches" Describes The Hair Upon The Upper Lip. But The Words Have In The Past Had Less Exact Meaning. Beard ...

Beardstown
Beardstown, A City Of Cass County, Illinois, U.s.a., On The East Bank Of The Illinois River, About 1 Oo Miles North Of St. Louis. It Is Served By The Baltimore And Ohio And The Burlington Railways And By Steamboats. The Population In 193o Was 6,344. It Has Important Fisheries, The ...

Bearer Securities
Bearer Securities. Stocks And Shares Can Be Held In Various Shapes By The Proprietor. The Bond To Bearer Is A Docu Ment Stating Upon Its Face That The Bearer Of It Is Entitled To A Specified Amount Of Stock In The Loan, Debenture, Share Or Other Security Which That Bond ...

Bearer
Bearer, Strictly "one Who Carries," A Term Used In India For A Palanquin-bearer, And Now Especially For A Body-servant. The Term Is Also Used In Connection With Military Ambulances, And "bearer" Companies Formed Part Of The Royal Army Medical Corps Until Amalgamated With The Field Hospitals To Form Field Ambulances ...

Bearings
Bearings, The Name Given To The Supports Of A Rotating Shaft. The Shaft Imposes A Load On Each Of The Bearings Support Ing It, And It Is Turned Against The Frictional Resistances Caused By This Loading. The Main Shaft Seen In A Workshop Carries Pulleys From Which Belts Transmit Power ...

Bearn
Bearn, Formerly A Small Frontier Province In The South Of France, Now Included Within The Department Of Basses-pyrenees. It Was Bounded On The West By Soule And Lower Navarre, On The North By Chalosse, Tursan And Astarac, East By Bigorre And South By The Pyrenees. Its Name Can Be Traced ...

Bear_2
Bear, In Dealing, A Term Used On The Stock Exchange, And In Other Markets In Which Speculation Occurs, To Describe A Specu Lator Who Sells What He Does Not Possess In The Hope That Before The Account Day He Will Be Able To Buy Back At A Lower Price, And ...

Beas Or Bias
Beas Or Bias, A River Of India. The Beas, Which Was The Hyphasis Of The Greeks, Is One Of The Five Rivers Of The Punjab. It Issues In The Snowy Mountains Of Kulu At An Altitude Of 13,3 26f T. Above Sea-level, Flows Through The Kangra Valley And The Plains ...

Beat Frequency
Beat Frequency, The Number Of Beats Per Unit Of Time. This Frequency Is Equal To The Difference Between The Frequencies Of The Combining Waves. ...

Beat Or Beating
Beat Or Beating. A Beat Is A Complete Cycle Of Pulsa Tions Produced When Two Or More Periodic Quantities Of Not Greatly Different Frequencies React With Each Other To Produce A Resultant Having Pulsations Of Amplitude. Beating Is An Instance Of This Phenomenon (see Sound). ...

Beat
Beat, A Blow Or Stroke; From The Many Applications Of The Verb "to Beat" Come Various Meanings Of The Substantive. It Is Applied To The Throbbing Of The Pulse Or Heart And To The Beating Of A Drum; In Music To The Alternating Sound Produced By The Striking Together Of ...

Beatification
Beatification, The Act Of Making Blessed; In The Roman Catholic Church A Stage In The Process Of Canonization (q.v.). ...

Beating The Bounds
Bounds, Beating The, An Ancient Custom Still Ob Served In Many English Parishes. In Times When Maps Were Rare It Was Usual To Make A Perambulation Of The Parish Boundaries On Ascension Day Or During Rogation Week. In The North Of Eng Land The Latter Is Still Called "gang Week" ...

Beatrice
Beatrice, A City Of Nebraska, U.s.a., 4om. S. Of Lincoln, In The Fertile Valley Of The Big Blue River, The County Seat Of Gage County. It Is On Federal Highway 77, And Is Served By The Bur Lington, The Rock Island And The Union Pacific Railways. The Population In 1930 ...

Beatus
Beatus, Of Valcavado, Spanish Theologian And Geographer, Was Born About 73o, And Died In 798. He Took A Prominent Part In The Adoptionist Controversy, And Wrote Against The Views Of Felix Of Urgel, And His Followers. About 776, He Produced His Commentaria In Apocalypsin To Which Was Attached One Of ...

Beaucaire
Beaucaire, Town In France, Department Of Gard, 17m. E. By S. Of Nimes On The P.l.m. Railway. Pop. (1931), Beaucaire Is On The Right Bank Of The Lower Rhone, Opposite Tarascon, With Which It Is Connected By A Suspension-bridge 1,476ft. Long, And By A Railway Bridge. A Triangular Keep, A ...

Beauce
Beauce (lat. Belsia), A Natural Region Of Northern France, Comprising Portions Of The Departments Of Eure-et-loire And Loire-et-cher, And Also Extending Into Loiret And Seine-et-oise. It Has An Area Of Over 2,800sq.m., Its Limits Being Defined By The Course Of The Essonne On The E., Of The Loire On The ...

Beauchamp
Beauchamp (be'cham), The Name Of Several Important English Families. The Baronial House Of Beauchamp Of Bedford Was Founded At The Conquest By Hugh De Beauchamp, Who Re Ceived A Barony In Bedfordshire. His Eldest Son Simon Left A Daughter, Whose Husband Hugh (brother Of The Count Of Meulan) Was Created ...

Beaufort Scale
Beaufort Scale, A Series Of Numbers From O To 12 Arranged By Admiral Sir Francis Beaufort (1774-1857) In 1806, To Indicate The Strength Of The Wind From A Calm, Force O, To A Hurricane, Force 12, "that Which No Canvas Could Withstand." The British Admiralty Accepted The Scale For The ...

Beaufort Sea
Beaufort Sea Is That Part Of The Arctic Sea That Lies Be Tween Alaska And The Canadian Arctic Islands. It Is Shallow To The South And East, But To The North-west Deepens To 1,600 Fathoms Or More. It Is Generally Covered With Drifting Ice And Has Not Been Penetrated By ...

Beaufort West
Beaufort West, A Town In South Africa, 339m. By Rail From Cape Town, 2,792ft. Above Sea-level, At The Foot Of The Nieuwveld Mountains. Its White Population In 1931 Was 3,337. It Is The Largest Town In The Western Part Of The Great Karroo. Owing To Its Dry Climate It Is ...

Beaufort
Beaufort, The Name Of The Family Descended From The Union Of John Of Gaunt, Duke Of Lancaster, With Catherine, Wife Of Sir Hugh Swynford, Taken From A Castle In Anjou Which Be Longed To John Of Gaunt. There Were Four Children Of This Union —john, Created Earl Of Somerset And ...

Beaufort_2
Beaufort, A Town Of South Carolina, U.s.a., 6om. West South-west Of Charleston, On Port Royal Island, 14m. From The Ocean, And Served By The Charleston And Western Carolina Rail Way; A Port Of Entry And The County Seat Of Beaufort County. The Population In 192o Was 2,831; 193o, 2,776. Beaufort ...

Beaugency
Beaugency, Town Of France, Department Of Loiret, 16m. S.w. Of Orleans On The Orleans Railway. Pop. (1931), 2,907. It Is At The Foot Of Vine-clad Hills On The Right Bank Of The Loire, Crossed By A Bridge Of 26 Arches Dating In Part From The 13th Century. The Lords Of ...

Beauharnais
Beauharnais, The Name Of A French Family, Well Known From The I 5th Century Onward In Orleanais. One Of Them, Jean Jacques De Beauharnais, Seigneur De Miramion, Had For Wife Marie Bonneau, Who In 1661, Founded A Female Charitable Order, Called After Her The Miramiones. Francois De Beauharnais, Mar Quis ...

Beaujeu
Beaujeu. The French Province Of Beaujolais Was Formed By The Development Of The Ancient Seigniory Of Beaujeu (depart Ment Of Rhone, Arrondissement Of Villefranche). The Lords Of Beaujeu Held From The 1 Oth Century Onwards A High Rank In Feudal Society. In 1210 Guichard Of Beaujeu Was Sent By Philip ...

Beauly
Beauly (pronounced Bewley; A Corruption Of Beaulieu), Town In Inverness-shire, Scotland, On The Beauly In Kilmorack Parish, 12m. W. Of Inverness By The L.m.s. Railway. Pop. (1931), 799. Its Chief Interest Is The Beautiful Remains Of The Priory Of St. John, Founded In 123o By John Bisset Of The Aird, ...

Beaumanoir
Beaumanoir, A Seigniory In What Is Now The Department Of Cotes-du-nord, France, Which Gave Its Name To An Illustrious Family. Jean De Beaumanoir, Marshal Of Brittany For Charles Of Blois, And Captain Of Josselin, Is Remembered For His Share In The Famous Battle Of The Thirty. This Battle, Sung By ...

Beaumaris
Beaumaris, Market Town, Municipal Borough, And County Town, Anglesey, North Wales, Situated At The North-east End Of The Menai Strait. Population (1931) 1,708. The Town Is A Typical Small Castle Town. Beaumaris Castle Was Built By Edward I. In 1293, The Name Being Derived From The Marsh ("beau Marais") Which ...

Beaumont
Beaumont And Fletcher, English Dramatists.' The Names Of Francis Beaumont (1584-1616) And John Fletcher Are Inseparably Connected In The History Of The English Drama. John Fletcher Was Born In Dec. 1579 At Rye In Sussex, And Baptized On The 20th Of The Same Month. Richard Fletcher, His Father, Afterwards Queen's ...

Beaumont_2
Beaumont, A City Of Texas, U.s.a., At The Head Of Naviga Tion On The Neches River, 28m. From The Gulf Of Mexico And Tom. N.e. Of Galveston; The County-seat Of Jefferson County. It Is On The Old Spanish Trail, Is Served By The Kansas City Southern, The Missouri Pacific, The ...

Beaune
Beaune, A Town Of France, Capital Of An Arrondissement In The Department Of Cote-d'or, On The Bouzoise, 23m. S.s.w. Of Dijon On The Main Line Of The P.l.m. Railway. Pop. (1931) 11,131. Beaune Lies In A Rich Wine-growing Region At The Foot Of The Hills Of Cote-d'or. It Was A ...

Beauty Culture
Beauty Culture Is The Science Of Improving Personal Appearance. It Embraces The Care Of The Skin, The Hair, The Hands And Nails, The Teeth And The Body, To Make Them Conform To The Standard Regarded By The Current Generation As Beautiful. Since Earliest Times, Cosmetics Have Played A Part In ...

Beauty
Beauty: See Aesthetics, Also Tertiary Qualities Under Qualities : Primary, Secondary And Tertiary. ...

Beauvais
Beauvais, A Town Of North France, Capital Of The De Partment Of Oise, 49m. N. By W. Of Paris, On The Northern Rail Way. Pop. (1931) 16,690. Beauvais Lies At The Foot Of Hills On The Left Bank Of The Therain At Its Confluence With The Avelon, And At The ...

Beauvillier
Beauvillier, The Name Of A Very Ancient French Family Belonging To The Country Around Chartres, Members Of Which Are Found Filling Court Offices From The 15th Century Onward. For Charles De Beauvillier, Gentleman Of The Chamber To The King, Governor And Bailli Of Blois, The Estate Of Saint Aignan Was ...

Beaver Dam
Beaver Dam, A City Of Dodge County (wis.), U.s.a., 55m. North-west Of Milwaukee, On Beaver Lake, And Served By The Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul And Pacific Railway. The Population Was 7,992 In 1920; It Was 9,867 In 193o. Dodge County Is A Rich Farming District And The County Fair Held ...

Beaver Falls
Beaver Falls, A Borough Of Beaver County, Pennsyl Vania, U.s.a., On A Plateau 5oft. Above The Beaver River, Three And One-half Miles From Its Confluence With The Ohio, And About 3om. N.w. Of Pittsburgh. It Is Served By The Pennsylvania And The New York Central Railways. The Population Was 12,802 ...

Beaver
Beaver, A Large, Aquatic, Gnawing Mammal (see Rodentia), Recognized By Its Large, Flat Scaly Tail. The Old World Beaver (castor Fiber) Is Found In Europe And Northern Asia ; The Very Similar American Beaver (c. Canadensis), Differs Chiefly In The Form Of The Nasal Bones Of The Skull. The Beavers ...

Beaver_2
Beaver, The Lower Part Of Thehelmet (q.v.) Fixed To The Neck Armour To Protect The Face And Cheeks ; Properly It Moved Up Wards, As The Visor Moved Down, But The Word Is Sometimes Used To Include The Visor. The Right Form Of The Word, "baver," Has Been Altered From ...

Beawar Or Nayanagar
Beawar Or Nayanagar, A Town Of British India, The Administrative Headquarters Of The Small Merwara District In Ajmere Merwara. It Is 33m. From Ajmere. Pop. (1931), 28,342. It Trades In Raw Cotton, And Has Cotton Presses And The Krishna Cotton Mills. ...

Bebung
Bebung, In Music, An Effect Principally Associated With The Clavichord, Consisting Of The Prolongation Or Repetition Of A Note, Not By Striking It Again, But By Continuing To Press The Key Slightly With The Finger. The Effect Was Much Admired And Was Cited By C. P. E. Bach In A ...

Beccafico
Beccafico (ital. "fig-pecker"), A Name Applied To A Small Bird, The Garden Warbler (sylvia Hortensis) ; Also To Several Allied Species (see Warbler). ...

Beccles
Beccles, Municipal Borough, Suffolk, England; On The Right Bank Of The River Waveney, 8m. W. Of Lowestoft On The London And North-eastern Railway. Population (193i) 6,544. Its Site Overlooks The Waveney. The Church Of St. Michael, Wholly Per Pendicular, Is A Fine Example Of The Style, And Has A Detached ...

Beche De Mer Or Trepang
Beche-de-mer Or Trepang (malay, Tripang), Dried Holothurians Used In The Gelatinous Soups Considered A Luxury By The Chinese And Other Eastern Peoples. The Name Was Not Originally A French Word, But Is Gallicized From Portuguese Bicho Da Mar, Sea-worm. Holothurians Are A Class Of Echino Derma (q.v.) Popularly Called "sea-cucumbers" ...

Bechuanaland
Bechuanaland, A Country Named After Its Inhabitants, The Bechuana. The Name Is Applied To A Region, Which Includes The Bechuanaland Protectorate And British Bechuanaland. The Latter Area, Lying Between The Orange And Molopo Rivers, Was Included In Cape Colony In 1895 (q.v.). The Protectorate, Estimated At 000sq.m., Is Bounded On ...

Beck
Beck (or Beek), David (1621-1656), Dutch Portrait Painter, Was Born At Arnheim In Guelderland. He Was Trained By Van Dyck And Worked As His Assistant Until Van Dyck's Death. Most Of His Work Was Done In England And Sweden. He Was Appointed Portrait-painter And Chamberlain To Queen Christina Of Sweden. ...

Beckenham
Beckenham, Urban District, Kent, England, Iom. S.s.e. Of London By The Southern Railway. Pop. (1881) 13,045; (1931) It Is A Long Straggling Parish Extending From The Western Tower Of The Crystal Palace Almost To The South End Of Bromley, And Contains The Residential Suburb Of Shortlands. Its Rapid In Crease ...

Beckley
Beckley, A Rapidly Growing City In The Midst Of The "smokeless" Coal-fields And Heavy Timber Stands Of West Virginia, U.s.a., 72m. S.e. Of Charleston; The County Seat Of Raleigh County. It Is On Federal Highways 19 And 21, And Is Served By The Chesapeake And Ohio And The Virginian Railways. ...

Beckum
Beckum, Chief Town Of A South-eastern Sub-division In The District Of Munster, In The Prussian Province Of Westphalia. Pop. (1933) 11,499. Brewing, Distilling, And Lime-burning Are The Main Industries. ...