Home >> Encyclopedia-of-architecture-1852 >> Dilapidation to Embankment

Encyclopedia of Architecture by Peter Nicholson (1852)

Dilapidation
Dilapidation, (from The Latin), The State Of A Build Ing Suffered To Fall Into A Ruinous Condition By Neglect. The Term Is Usually Restricted, In Its Legal Sense, To The Pulling Down Or Destroying The Houses Or Buildings Belonging To An Ecclesiastical Benefice, Or Suffering Them By Neglect To Fall ...

Dimension
Dimension (from The Latin) A Principal Distance Mea Sured In A Straight Line On The Surface Of It Body, In Some Particular Direction. Or Through Some Certain Point, By The Help Of Which The Body May Be Constructed Or Measured As To Its Superficial Or Solid Contents. The Dimensions Of ...

Dinocrates
Dinocrates, An Eminent Architect, Patronized By Alexander The Great ; Whose History Is Thus Related By Vitru Vins :—• At The That Alexander Was Conquering The World, Dinocrates, The Architect, Confiding In His Knowledge And Genius, And Being Desirous Of Obtaining The Royal Com Mendation, Left Macedon, And Repaired To ...

Diorama
Diorama, A Mode Of Painting And Scenic Exhibition Invented A Few Years Ago By Two French Artists, Dagnerre And Bouton. The Peculiar, And Almost Magical Effect Of The Diorama Arises. In A Great Degree, From The Contrivance Em Ployed In Exhibiting, The Painting. Which Is Viewed Through A Large Opening ...

Distemper
Distemper, (from The French, Detremper, To Temper Or Dilute.) In Painting, The Working Up Of Colours With Some Thing Besides Mere Water Or Oil, If Colours Be Prepared With Water, The Painting Is Called /ifiting ; And If With Oil, It Is Called Painting In Oil, Or Simply Painting. If ...

Dog Legged Stairs
Dog-legged Stairs. Bracket Stairs Are Those That Have An Opening Or Well, With Strings And Newels, And Are Supported By Landings And Carriages, The Brackets Mitering To The Ends Of Each Riser, And Fixed To The String-board, Which Is Moulded Below Like An Architrave. The Same Methods Must Be Observed ...

Dome
Dome, A Term Applied To A Covering Of The Whole Or Part Of A Building. The Germans Call It Dom, And The Italians Duomo, And Apply The Word To The Principal Church Of A City, Although The Building May Not Have Any Spherical Or Poly Gonal Dome. From This And ...

Domestic Arciiitecture
Domestic Arciiitecture, That Department Of' The Art Which Relates Especially To The Design And Erection Of Edi Fices Adapted To Private Purposes As Distinguished From Those Erected For Public Uses, More Particularly Of Such As Are Em Ployed As Private Dwellings. Although Holding An Inferior Position In The Scale When ...

Dooms
Dooms, Pieces Of Wood, About Nine Inches In Length; In Serted In Stone Or Brick Walls; The Term Is Used In Scotland, And Is Of The Same Import With The London Term, Plugs, Or Wood Bricks. Door, (from The Saxon Dor), The Gate Of A House, Or The Passage Into ...

Doors
Doors, Framed, Which Are Either Single, Folding, Double, Or Double Margin, Are Employed In All Descriptions Of Build Ings, And Consist Of Styles, Rails, Panels, And, In Most Cases, Of Munitions Also. The Framing Includes All The Parts But The Panels, And Is Held Together With Mortices And Tenons. The ...

Dragon Beams
Dragon-beams, According To Neve, Are Said To Be " Two Strong Braces Or Struts, That Stand Under A Bressummer, Meeting In An Angle Under The Shoulder Of A King Piece." —neve's Builder's Dictionary. The Writers Of The Present Work Have Never Heard The Term Applied To Story-posts And Bressummers, Nor ...

Draught
Draught, In Architecture, The Representation Of A Building On Paper, Explanatory Of The Various Parts Of The Exterior And Interior, By Means Of Plans, Elevations, And Sec Tions, Drawn To A Scale, By Which All The Parts Are Represented In The Same Proportion As The Parts Of The Edifice Intended ...

Drawing
Drawing, In Its Strict Meaning, May Be Defined As The Art Of Representing Objects, On Any Convenient Surface, By Lines Describing Their Form And Contour. This Is Independent Of Colour, And Even Of Shadow ; Because, Notwithstanding Form May Be Expressed By Outline Alone, Shadow, While Giving Surface And Substance, ...

Drops
Drops, In Architecture, Small Pendent Cylinders, Or The Frustums Of Cones Attached To A Vertical Surface, The Axis Of The Cylinders Or Cones Having Also A Vertical Position, And Their Tipper Ends Attached To A Horizontal Surtlice. Drops Are Used In The Cornice Of The Doric Order Under The Mutules, ...

Dubbing
Dubbing, In Bricklaying, Is Replacing And Making Good Any Decayed Brickwork, When The Wall Is To Be Repointed. Dun, Or Burgh, The Name Of An Ancient Species Of Buildings, Of A Circular Form, Common In The Orkney And Shetland Islands, The Hebrides, And Northern Parts Of Scot Land. The Latter ...

Duodecimals
Duodecimals, A Term Applied To An Arithmetical Me Thod Of Ascertaining The Number Of Square Feet And Square Inches In A Rectangular Space, Whose Sides Are Given In Feet And Inches. In This Series Of Denominations (beginning With Feet) Every Unit In The Preceding Denomination Makes Twelve In That Which ...

Ec11 A N1cs
Ec11 A N1cs (from The Greek Pqyarn, Art) That Branch Of Practical Mathematics Which Treats Of Motion And Moving Tamers, Their Nature, Laws, Effects, &e. This Term, In A Popular Sense, Is Applied Equally To The Doctrine Of The Equi Librium Of Powers, More Properly Called Statics, And To That ...

Ecbatana
Ecbatana, The Capital Of Ancient Media, And The Resi Dence Of The Median And Persian Kings. It Was Situated In A Plain, About Twelve Stadia From Mount Orontes. Diodorus Says It Was 250 Stadia In Circuit. The Walls Were Seven In Number, Built Upon A Circular Plan, Rising Gradually Above ...

Ecclesiastical Architecture
Ecclesiastical Architecture. Under This Title It Is Our Intention To Inquire Into The Nature Of The Places Of Worship Employed By The Early Christians, To Consider The Origin And Progress Of Buildings Devoted To This Purpose, With A Cursory Glance At Their History, And To Describe Generally Their Form, Distribution, ...

Echinus
Echinus (from Extrog, A Word Denoting The Prickly Cover Of A Chesnut) A Convex Moulding In The Form Of A Conic Section, Generally Carved Into Ornaments Representing Trun Cated Spheroids, Or Eggs, With The Upper Ends Cut Off, The Upper Part Of The Axis Projecting, And The Lower Part Receding. ...

Eddystone Ligiitiiouse
Eddystone Ligiitiiouse, A Celebrated Building Erected Upon A Cluster Of Very Dangerous Rocks, Situated In The English Channel, In Latitude 3' N., And Longitude 21' W. These Rocks Are About Fourteen Miles From Plymouth Sound, And, Lying Nearly In The Track Of Vessels Going Up Or Down Channel, Have Been ...

Egyptian Architecture
Egyptian Architecture. The Character Of The Egyptians, As Developed In Early History, Would Naturally Lead Us To Suppose, That An Inquiry Into Their Style And Man Ner Of Building Would Form A Subject For Interesting Study, Not Only To The Antiquary, But Also To All Such As Take Any Interest ...

Embankment
Embankment, A Large Body, Mound, Or Bank Of Earth, Constructed Or Thrown Up In Different Ways, According To Cir Eumstances. Embankments Are Of Various Kinds, Aceoyding To The Purposes For Which They Are Designed, As 1:aitway Embankments, Which Carry A Line Of Railway Over Valleys And Low Ground At The ...