Home >> Encyclopedia Americana, Volume 17 >> Little Rock to Lollards

Encyclopedia Americana, Volume 17

Little Rock
Little Rock, Ark., Capital Of The State, The Seat Of Pulaski County And The Largest City In The State, On The Missouri Pacific, The Rock Island And The Saint Louis Southwestern Rail Way Systems, 133 Miles West Of Memphis, 346 Miles Southwest Of Saint Louis, 165 Miles Cast Of Fort ...

Littre
Littre, Maximilien Paul Emile, Male Si-mil-i-66 P61 A-mel Le-tra, French Lexicogra Pher And Philosopher: B. Paris, 1 Feb. 1801; D. There, 2 June 1881. After Completing His Course At School He Studied Deeply In English And Ger Man And In Classical And Sanskrit Literature. He Intended To Follow The Medical ...

Liturgy
Liturgy (greek Xeirovpyla Means A Pub Lic Service; Used At Athens To Mean A Public Service Which The Richer Citizens Discharged At Their Own Expense). The Septuagint Translators Used The Greek Word Leitourgos For That Serv Ice Of God In The Sanctuary. In The Hebrew It Had Various Kindred Meanings; ...

Liut Prand Liudprand
Liudprand, Liut Prand, Or Liuzo, Italian Historian: B. About 922; D. 972. He Was Of A Noble Lom Bard Lineage. His Father, Who Was King Hugo's Ambassador To Constantinople, Dying When The Son Was Not More Than Five Years Old, Young Liudprand Was Educated As A Page To King Hugo's ...

Live Stock
Live Stock, The Feeding Of. Bal Anced Ration Is The Amount Of Food Fed To An Animal In One Day Of 24 Hours. As With Humans This Ration Is Usually Fed In Three Meals. A Balanced Ration Is A Ration Which Will Fully Meet All The Physiological Needs Of The ...

Liver
Liver. The Liver Is The Largest Glandular Organ Of The Body. In Man It Is Situated On The Right Side Of The Abdominal Cavity Immediately Beneath The Diaphragm. Its Weight In The Adult Is Approximately From Three To Four Pounds, And Its Size Is Roughly Indicated By The Follow Ing ...

Liverpool
Liverpool, Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2d Earl Of, English Statesman: B. London, 7 June 1770; D. There, 4 Dec. 1828. He Was The Eldest Son Of Charles Jenkinson, 1st Earl Of Liverpool (q.v.). He Was Educated At Charter House School And Christ Church College, Ox Ford, 1786-89; In The Latter Year ...

Liverpool
Liverpool, England, A City, Municipal, County, And Parliamentary Borough, And Seaport, On The Right Bank Of The Mersey, Three Miles From The Sea, And Extending About Eight And A Half Miles Along The East Side Of The River. It Is The Second Seaport Of The British Empire, And Is Fourth ...

Lives
Lives, Parallel (mot Irapa.17/aoi), The Work Upon Which Plutarch's Fame Chiefly Rests, Were Published By Him Late In Life After His Re Turn To Chzronea, And, If One May Judge From The Long Lists Of Authorities Given, Must Have Taken Many Years In The Compilation. The Bi Ographies Appear In ...

Lives Of The Poets
Lives Of The Poets. The 'lives Of The Poets,' The °most Memorable Of Johnson's Literary Works," Is An Established English Clas Sic. It Is So Ranked In Spite Of Inequalities And Numerous Defects Resulting From Johnson's Predilections And Methods Of Work. Early In 1777, To Meet The Competition Of The ...

Livia Drusilla
Livia Drusilla, Dro-silla, Wife Of The Roman Emperor Augustus: B. About 55 B.c.; D. 29 A.d. She Was The Daughter Of L. Livius Drusus Claudianus, Who Committed Suicide After The Battle Of Philippi. Livia Be Came The Wife Of Tiberius Claudius Nero, By Whom She Had Two Sons, Tiberius The ...

Livingston
Livingston, Edward, American States Man : B. Clermont, N. Y., 26 May 1764; D. Rhinebeck, N. Y., 23 May 1836. He Was Grad Uated From The College Of New Jersey In 1781, Was Admitted To The Bar In 1785, Was A New York Representative In Congress (1795-1801) And Was A ...

Livingston_2
Livingston, John H., American Divine And Virtual Founder Of Two Institutions Of Learning, Rutgers College And The Theological Seminary Of The Reformed Church In America, At New Brunswick, N. J.: B. Poughkeepsie, N. Y., 30 May 1746; D. 20 Jan. 1825. He Was Graduated From Yale College And Studied Law ...

Livingston_3
Livingston, Robert R. (the Initial R. Having Been Assumed For Purposes Of Distinc Tion), American Statesman, Commonly Known As "chancellor Livingston" : B. New York, 27 Nov. 1746; D. Clermont, N. Y., 26 Feb. 1813. He Was Graduated From Columbia (then King's College) In 1765, Was Admitted To The Bar ...

Livingston_4
Livingston, William, American States Man : B. Albany, N. Y., 30 Nov. 1723; D. Eliza Bethtown, N. J., 25 July 1790. He Was Gradu Ated From Yale In 1741, Was Admitted To The Bar In 1748, Attained Distinction In Practice, Was Elected To The Provincial Legislature From Liv Ingston Manor, ...

Livingstone
Livingstone, David, Scottish Missionary And African Traveler : B. Blantyre, Lanarkshire, 19 March 1813 ,• D. Near Lake Bangweolo, Africa, 1 May 1873. His Parents Had Settled In The Neighborhood Of The Cotton Mills Near Blantyre, Where David Be Came A Upiecerp At The Age Of 10. While At Work ...

Livonia
Livonia, 1i-veini-a. (ger. Livland; Russ. Livlandya), A Former Government Of Russia And One Of The Three' Baltic Provinces, Bounded On The North By Esthonia, South By Courland, On The West By The Gulf Of Riga And East By Lake Peipus And The Governments Of Petrograd, Pskov And Vitebsk. Together With ...

Livre
Livre, Le-vr', An Ancient French Coin, Now Superseded By The Franc As The Unit Of Value. The Livre Was Equal To About 20 Francs ($4). The Livre Was Also The Unit Of Weight Until Superseded By The Kilogram — The Equivalent Of Two 'ivies — In The Metric System. Livy ...

Liza
Liza. By ,ivin Sergeyevitch Turgenief. There Are Several Translations For The Original Title Of This Novel, Gnyezd6> —'a Nest Of Nobles,' A Nobleman's Nest,> 'a House Of Gentlefolk.) The Title Is Evi Dently More Or Less Symbolical, Nest' Not Referring To The Residence Of Any Particular Gentleman Or Nobleman. The ...

Lizard
Lizard, A Subclass Of Reptiles, Whose Anatomical Features And Classification Have Been Described Under Lacertilia. A General Account Of Their Habits And Ecology Has Been Reserved For The Present Article. Lizards As A Group Are Of Comparatively Recent Origin, Most Of The Fossils Known Not Being Older Than The Middle ...

Llama
Llama, One Domesticated Form (often Specifically Distinguished As Lama Gdama) Of The Huanaco (q.v.), The Other Being The Wool Bearing Alpaca (q.v.). It Is Larger Than The Wild Huanaco (about Three Feet At The Shoulder), And May Be White, Brown, Black Or Variegated. With Patches Of All Three Colors. This ...

Lloyd
Lloyd, John Uri, American Chemist And Author: B. West Bloomfield, N. Y. 19 April 1849. He Was Educated In Private Schools; Was Professor Of Pharmacy At The Cincinnati Col Lege Of Pharmacy, 1883-87; Professor Of Chem Istry At The Eclectic Medical Institute, 1878 1900, And President Of The Eclectic Medical ...

Lloyds Register
Lloyd's Register, A Shipping Record Of Vessels In Commission And Their Ratings Ac Cording To Construction, .physical Condition And Equipment. Lloyd's Register Had Its Beginning In 1799, When The Underwriters' Registry, Or Green Book, Published By A Committee Of Lloyd's (q.v.) Was Denounced As Unfair By The British Ship Owners ...

Load Line
Load Line, A Mark Placed By Recognized Authority On The Side Of A Vessel To Indicate The Maximum Depth To Which She May Be Legally Loaded Under The British Law. It Is Required To He 12 Inches In Length And One Inch In Width, And Is Accompanied Or Enclosed By ...

Lobby
Lobby, The, A Class Of Persons Who Seek To Influence Legislation Outside Of The Regular Legislature Which Has Come In The United States To Be Known Derisively As The "third The Term Was Originally Applied To The Waiting Rooms Of Legislative Halls, And Then To Those Persons Who Frequented These ...

Lobo
Lobo, Francisco Rodrigues, Portuguese Author: B. Leiria, About 1575; D. About 1627. Nothing Is Known Of His Life Beyond The Fact That He Came Of A Wealthy Family; That He Studied At The University Of Coimbra Where He Took The Degree Of Licentiate About 1600; And That He Lived At ...

Lobster
Lobster, The Name Of Certain Large Crustaceans Of The Crab Group, And Especially Of The Genera Honiara:, Nephrops And Pali Nurus. To The First Belong The Common Euro Pean And American Lobsters (homarus Gam ',tants And Americana:). Nephrops Differ Chiefly In Possessing 19, Instead Of 20, Pairs Of Gills, And ...

Local Government
Local Government, Principles Of. In All Countries Of Any Size The Work Of Govern !tent Is Divided Between The Central Authorities And Officials In Local Districts; And The General Character Of The Government As A Whole Is Affected Largely By The System Of Local Govern Ment And The Relations Between ...

Local Option
Local Option. The Phrase Local Op Tion May Be Applied To A Great Variety Of Mat Ters Which May Be Determined By The Action Of Local Communities. In The Broadest Sense, It Includes All Powers Of Local Government, As Dis Tinguished From Mandatory Duties. More Com Monly The Term Is ...

Locality
Locality, Perception Of. Our Sensa Tions Are Associated With Positions In Space. That This Is The Case With Vision And Joint Sensations Is Obvious, While In All The Other Senses A Stimulus Is Referred To The Approxi Mate Spatial Position Of The Organ That Perceives It, And Is Possibly Further ...

Location
Location Carbon Ash Sulphur Connellsville, Pa 89% 10% 1% Pocahontas, Va 93% 6% 1% Combustion Takes Place When The Elements Or The Constituents Of A Fuel, Which Are Mainly Carbon And Hydrogen, Form A Chemical Combination With Oxygen Anti Produce Oxides. Heat Accompanies This Chemi Cal Action And It Is ...

Lock
Lock, A Mechanical Appliance Used For Fastening Doors, Chests, Etc., Generally Opened By A Key; Or More Broadly Speaking, A Lock Is A Bolt Guarded By An Obstacle, And Controlled By A Key. The Bolt May Be Pivoted Or Rotary, But Usually Slides; The Key Generally Rotates, But May Act ...

Locke
Locke, John, English Philosopher: B. Wrington, Somerset, 29 Aug. 1632; D. Oates, Essex, 28 Oct. 1704. He Was The Son Of An At Torney Who Became A Captain In The Parlia Mentary Army. Locke Was Educated At West Minster School And At Christ Church, Oxford, Where He Was Graduated And ...

Lockhart
Lockhart, Lok'art, John Gibson, Scot Tish Editor And Biographer: B. Cambusnethan, Lanarkshire, 14 July 1794; D. Abbotsford, 25 Nov. 1854. He Was Graduated At Glasgow And Balliol College, Oxford, And Became A Member Of The Scottish Bar In 1817. He Never Practised As An Advocate, But Devoted His Time To ...

Locksley Hall
Locksley Hall. Termyson's (locks Ley Hall' Is Perhaps Not Only The Best Known Among His Shorter Poems But Is Also One Of The Most Widely Read Poems In The Language. It Is A Lyrical Monologue, 194 Lines In Length, In Eight-stress Trochaic Couplets. Published In 1842, When The Poet Himself ...

Lockwood
Lockwood, Belva Ann Bennett, American Lawyer And Reformer: B. Royalton, N. Y., 24 Oct. 1830; D. Washington, 19 May 19f7. She Was Graduated From Genesee Col Lege, Lima, N.. Y., In 1857, And Taught School 1857-68. She Was Married In 1848 To Uriah H. Mcnall (d. 1853), And In 1868 ...

Locomotive
Locomotive, Principal Parts Of.— The Following List Embodies Brief Descriptions Of The Construction And Operation Of The Vari Ous Principal Parts Of The Modern Locomotive, For Further Information Consult Articles Under The Titles Locomotive; Locomotive Industry Engine Ixnusrav In This Encyclopedia. Ant Air-pressure Connection For Ringing The Signal Bell. Hoes.— ...

Locomotive
Locomotive, A Self-propelling Vehicle, Usually A Vehicle Consisting Of A Steam Engine And Boiler, Mounted On Wheels And So Con Nected As To Be Capable Of Self-propulsion Along A Track. The Steam Locomotive Has Been In Commercial Use Since The Early Part Of The 19th Century. It Was About The ...

Locomotive Industry
Locomotive Industry, The Un Like Many Of The Great American Industries The History Of The Inception And Growth Of Loco Motive Engineering In The United States May Be Clearly Traced From The Day When The First Loco Motive Was Run Upon The Rails Of The Baltimore And Ohio Railroad. Other ...

Locomotor Ataxia
Locomotor Ataxia, A Popular Name For A Disease Of The Nervous System, Which Is Caused Exclusively By Syphilis, Al Though Less Than Half Of 1 Per Cent Of Those Who Have Syphilis Develop It, And Usually Occurs In Adults From 40 To 50. It Is Characterized By Pain, Inability To ...

Locust
Locust, A Genus (robinia) Of Legumi Nous Trees And Shrubs. The Species Have Odd Pinnate Leaves; Pea-like Flowers In Drooping Racemes, And Pods Containing Several Bean-like Seeds. They Are All Useful For Ornamental Planting, And Orie Species, R. Pseudacacia, Is Highly Valued For Its Timber. This Species Which Is The ...

Lodge
Lodge, Henry Cabot, American States Man And Historian: B. Boston, 12 May 1850. He Was Graduated At Harvard In 1871 And From The Law School There In 1874. From 1873 To 1876 He Edited The North American Review. In The Three Years Following He Lec Tured On American History At ...

Loeb
Loeb, Leb, Jacques, German-american Physiologist And Biologist: B. Germany, 7 April 1859. He Studied At Berlin, Munich And Strassburg, Was Assistant At Both Wiirzburg (1886-88) And Strassburg (1888-90), Studied At The Naples Zoological Station, And In 1891-92 Was Associate Professor Of Biology At Bryn Mawr College. In 1892 He Became ...

Loess
Loess, Les Or Toes, A Loamy Deposit Of Pleistocene Age, Abundantly Developed In The Valleys Of The Rhine, The Danube, The Rhone And Many Of Their Tributaries. It Is A Pulveru Lent Yellowish-gray Or Brownish Loam, Homo Geneous And Non-plastic, And Consists Principally Of Clay With Small Angular Grains Of ...

Log Perch
Log Perch, A Fish Of The Darter Group, And Its Largest Member. It Is Locally Known As Hogfish, Hog Molly, Rockfish, Etc., And Is Easily Distinguished By Its Zebra Stripes. It Attains A Length Of Eight Inches And Frequents Clear Cold Streams. Consult Jordan And Copeland, 'johnny Darters' (in American ...

Logan
Logan, George, American Statesman And Philanthropist; Grandson Of James Logan (q.v.) : B. Stenton, Now A Part Of Philadelphia, 9 Sept. 1753; D. There, 9 April 1821. He Was Educated In England, Subsequently Studied Medicine In Edinburgh, Where He Took The De Gree Of M.d., And Afterward Returned In 1779 ...

Logan_2
Logan, James, American Colonial States Man And Author: B. Lurgan, Ireland, 20 Oct. 1674; D. Stenton, Near Philadelphia, Pa., 31 Oct. 1751. By His Own Efforts He Acquired A Knowledge Of The Chief Ancient And Modern Languages, And In 1699, Being Then Established In Trade In Bristol, England, Accepted An ...

Logan_3
Logan, John Alexander, American Sol Dier And Politician: B. Jackson County, Ill., 9 Feb. 1826; D. Washington, D. C., 26 Dec. 1886. He Studied At Shiloh College, Volunteered As A Private In The Mexican War, Became A Lieuten Ant In The First Illinois Infantry, After The War Studied Law, Was ...

Logansport
Logansport, Ind., City, County-seat Of Cass County, Locally Known As The 'city Of Bridges," 77 Miles North By West Of Indian Apolis, Where The Eel River Flows Into The Wabash. The City Is An Important Railroad Centre, Being Entered By The Chicago, Rich Mond, Bradford And Effner Divisions Of The ...

Logarithms
Logarithms. The Common Logarithm Of A Number Is The Index Of The Power To Which 10 Must Be Raised To Be Equal To The Number. Thus !os= 1,000, So That The Logarithm Of 1,000 (usually Written Log. 1,000) Is 3. Now 10=-10, Loo, 10.-- Low, And It Is Well Known ...

Logic
Logic. Logic Is That Philosophical Science Which Deals With The Principles And Methods Of All Thinking. The Processes Of Thought, Although Varied In Form And Content, Have Always A Single End; To Interpret The Past And The Present, And By Means Of Such Interpre Tation To Forecast The Future. It ...

Logos
Logos (greek X6yoc, From Arty, To Speak), Word, Language, Speech In General. Language Being Peculiar To Man As A Reason Able Being, And Speech Presupposing Thought, Logos Signifies Reason, The Faculty Of Thinlcmg In General. Thus Logos Has The Meaning Both Of Thought And Utterance. In Christian Theol Ogy This ...

Logue
Logue, Log', Michael, Cardinal, Priest Of The Roman Church And Primate Of All Ire Land: B. Raphoe, 1 Oct. 1840. Before He Was Yet A Priest He Filled The Chairs Of Theology And Belles-lettres In The Irish College, Paris, Where He Was Ordained In 1866. Returning To His Native Diocese ...

Logwood
Logwood, The Heart-wood Of Henia Toxylon Campechianum, A Leguminous Tree Which Grows Wild, In Most Places, Along The Eastern Shores Of Mexico And Central America. From Its Abundance In Some Parts Near The Bay Of Campeachy It Is Sometimes Called Campeachy Wood. The Leaves Are Pinnate; The Flowers Small, Yellowish ...

Lohengrin
Lohengrin, 16'en-gren, A Romantic Opera In Three Acts, Both Music And Words By Richard Wagner; First Performed At Weimar, Germany, On 28 Aug. 1850; First Production In America, 3 April 1871, At The Stadt Theatre, New York; In London, 1875. In This, Perhaps The Most Popular Of All His Operas, ...

Loire
Loire, Na? (anc. Liger), France, The Largest River Of The Country, Dividing It Into Two Nearly Equal Portions. It Rises On The Western Slope Of The Cevennes, In The Department Of Ardeche, And Flows Generally Northwest And West To Its Outlet In The Bay Of Biscay Below Nantes. Its Principal ...

Loki
Loki, Ifi'ke, In Mythology, The God Of Strife And Spirit Of Evil. He Artfully Contrived The Death Of Balder, When Odin Had Forbidden Everything That Springs °from Fire, Air, Earth And Water" To Injure Him. The Mistletoe, Not Being Included, Was Made Into An Arrow, Given To The Blind Wider, ...

Lollardism
Lollardism, 161'ar-dizm, In Great Britain, The Tenets Of 'the Followers Of John Wyclif. The Views Of Wyclif Underwent A Process Of Development As His Researches And Experience Extended, And Were By No Means The Same At All Periods Of His Life. In So Far As They Departed From Roman Catholicism, ...

Lollards
Lollards, A Name Which Arose In The Netherlands In The 14th Century, And Which During That And The Following Century Was Applied Somewhat Indiscriminately As A Term Of Contempt To Various Sects Or Fraterni Ties Deemed Heretical By The Roman Catholic Church. Different Accounts Are Given Of The Derivation Of ...