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Ampelopsis
Ampelopsis, A Genus Of The Vine Family, Vitaceae, Strongly Resembling The Grape-vine In Habit, Comprising Some 25 Species Native To Warm Regions In Asia And North America, Some Of Which Are Cultivated As Ornamental Climbers. Of These, The Pepper-vine (a. Arborea), Somewhat Shrubby, With Pinnate Leaves, And The Simple-leaved Ampelopsis ...

Ampere Meter Or Ammeter
Ampere Meter Or Ammeter, An Instrument For Measuring Electric Currents. Ammeters Used For The Measure Ment Of Direct Current Are Moving Iron Or Moving Coil Low Resist Ance Galvanometers (see Galvanometer) . In The Latter Form Of Instrument The Current Passes Through A Coil Hung In The Field Of A ...

Ampere
Ampere, The Practical Unit Of Electric Current. It Is Equal To Absolute Electromagnetic Units. (see Physical Units.) ...

Ampersand
Ampersand, The Name Of The Sign, & Or &, Which Is A Combination Of The Letters E, T, Of The Lat. Et, And ; A Corruption Of The Mixed English And Latin Phrase, "and Per Se And," Of Which Dialect Forms Are, "ampussyand," Or "amperseand." ...

Amphiaraus
Amphiaraus, A Celebrated Seer And Prince Of Argos, Son Of Oicles (or Apollo) And Hypermestra. He Took Part In The Voyage Of The Argonauts And In The Chase Of The Calydonian Boar. He Foresaw The Disastrous Issue Of The War Against Thebes And At First Refused To Share In It ...

Amphibia Classification
Amphibia - Classification 1. Labyrinthodontia.—amphibiawith A Roofed Skull, A Lower Jaw Consisting Of At Least Eight Bones On Each Side And Vertebrae Consisting Of Neural Arches And Intercentra In All Forms, With Pleurocentra In Addition In Most. The Labyrinthodontia Are Divided Into Three Suborders, Or Grades : Embolomeri, Rachitomi And ...

Amphibia Evolution
Amphibia - Evolution The First Land Vertebrates.—the Most Primitive Of The Fossil Amphibia Are Unquestionably The Embolomeri. Already In Carboniferous Times The Group Contained, As Shown By Watson, "primitively Aquatic Animals Which Show No Signs Of Ever Having Possessed Terrestrial Ancestors," As Well As Others Which Were Ob Viously Terrestrial, ...

Amphibia General Morphology
Amphibia - General Morphology Integument.—the Skin Of Modern Amphibia May Be Rough And Dry Or Smooth And Moist, But It Is Never Covered With Scales As In Nearly All Reptiles. Many Coecilians, However, Have Rings Of Minute Scales Hidden In The Transverse Folds Of Their Skin. Aquatic Or Fossorial Amphibia, ...

Amphibia
Amphibia, The Term Applied To One Of The Six Classes Of Vertebrate Animals. This Class Includes The Frogs, Toads, Sala Manders And Coecilians, Forms Which Stand In The Zoological Scale Midway Between The Fishes And The Reptiles. Many Aquatic Ani Mals, Such As Crocodiles And Seals, Are Amphibious, But, As ...

Amphibole
Amphibole, An Important Group Of Rock-forming Min Erals Very Similar In Chemical Composition And General Char Acters To The Pyroxenes And, Like Them, Falling Into Three Series According To The System Of Crystallization (from The Gr. Aµ 01.43oxos, "ambiguous") . They Differ From The Pyroxenes, How Ever, In Having An ...

Amphibolite
Amphibolite, In Petrology The Name Given To A Grey, Green Or Black, Typically Non-schistose Rock Consisting Mainly Of Amphibole And A Felspar Of The Plagioclase Group, The Use Of The Term Being Restricted, However, To Rocks Of Metamorphic Origin. The Term May Be Contrasted With Hornblende Schist, Which Is Of ...

Amphibology Or Amphiboly
Amphibology Or Amphiboly, In Logic, A Verbal Fallacy Arising From Ambiguity In The Grammatical Structure Of A Sentence (aristotle, Organon, Sopla. El., Ch. Iv.). It Occurs Fre Quently In Poetry, Owing To The Alteration For Metrical Reasons Of The Natural Order Of Words ; Jevons Quotes As An Example Shakespeare, ...

Amphictyony
Amphictyony, An Association Of Ancient Greek Com Munities Centring In A Shrine (from The Greek Aµ4ucriopes, "dwellers Around"). The Association Primarily Comprised Neigh Bours, Though The Delphic Amphictyony Came To Include Distant Communities. Neighbouring Communities Chose The Sanctuary Of Some Deity At Which To Hold Their Periodical Festival For Worship ...

Amphilochus
Amphilochus (am-f Il'o-kus), In Greek Legend, A Famous Seer, Son Of Amphiaraus And Eriphyle And Brother Of Alcmaeon. According To Some, He Assisted In The Murder Of Eriphyle, Which, According To Others, Was Carried Out By Alcmaeon Alone. He Took Part In The Expedition Of The Epigoni Against Thebes And ...

Amphineura
Amphineura, Group Of Marine Invertebrate Animals Con Stituting A Class Of The Mollusca (q.v.), The Majority With A Shell Of Eight Transverse Plates. A Much Smaller Number Are De Void Of A Shell And Have The General Appearance Of Worms. Up To The Present Upwards Of 120 Genera Of These ...

Amphion
Amphion And Zethus, In Greek Mythology, The Twin Sons Of Zeus By Antiope. When Children, They Were Exposed On Mt. Cithaeron, But Were Found And Brought Up By A Shepherd. Amphion Became A Great Singer And Musician, Zethus A Hunter And Herdsman. After Punishing Lycus And Dirce For Cruel Treat ...

Amphioxus Or Lancelet
Amphioxus Or Lancelet, A Small, Marine Creature, Neither Fish Nor Worm, But Something Between The Two, Which Is The Simplest Example Of The Vertebrate Type Of Structure. It Was First Discovered On The Coast Of Cornwall, And A Preserved Specimen Sent To Pallas, Who Was Unacquainted With Its Lively Movements, ...

Amphipoda
Amphipoda, An Order Of Crustacea (q.v.), With The Body Usually Laterally Compressed, The Second And Third Pairs Of Thoracic Appendages Generally Modified As Prehensile Organs And The Three Anterior Abdominal Appendages Many Jointed. The Best Known Form Is The Fresh-water Shrimp (gammarus), Common In Nearly All Parts Of The World. ...

Amphipolis
Amphipolis (mod. Yeni Kevi), Ancient City Of Mace Donia, On The East Bank Of The River Strymon, Where It Emerges From Lake Cercinitis, About 3m. From The Sea. Originally A Thra Cian Town, Known As 'ev74a 'not ("nine Roads"), It Was Colonized By Athenians With Other Greeks Under Hagnon In ...

Amphisbaena
Amphisbaena Is The Name Given To The Main Genus Of A Family Of Worm-shaped Lizards, Most Of Which Inhabit The Tropical Parts Of America, The West Indies And Africa. The Com Monest Species In South America And The Antilles Is The Sooty Or Dusky A. F Uliginosa. The Body Of ...

Amphitheatre
Amphitheatre, A Building, Primarily For Entertainments, In Which The Seats For The Spectators Surround The Stage Or Arena. It Is Differentiated From The Stadium (q.v.) By The Fact That Its Shape Approximates An Ellipse. The Amphitheatre Was Early Devel Oped In The Italian Peninsula As The Logical Building For The ...

Amphitrite
Amphitrite, In Mythology Of Ancient Greece, A Sea Goddess, Daughter Of Nereus (or Oceanus) And Wife Of Poseidon. It Was Said That Poseidon Saw Her First Dancing At Naxos Among The Other Nereids, And Carried Her Off. She Then Fled From Him Over The Sea, But Was Found By The ...

Amphitryon
Amphitryon, In Greek Mythology, Son Of Alcaeus, King Of Tiryns. Having Accidentally Killed His Uncle Electryon, King Of Mycenae, He Was Driven Out By Another Uncle, Sthenelus. He Fled With Alcmene, Electryon's Daughter, To Thebes, Where He Was Cleansed From The Guilt Of Blood By Creon, His Maternal Uncle, King ...

Amphora
Amphora, Usually An Earthenware Vessel Used By The An Cient Greeks And Romans And So Named From Having A Handle On Each Side Of The Neck (gr. 64.41., On Both Sides; (opal', To Carry). Amphorae Either Rested On A Foot, Or Ended In A Point So That They Had To ...

Ampliative Judgments Or Propositions
Ampliative Judgments Or Propositions Are Those In Which Something Is Affirmed That Is Not Included In The Definition Or Connotation Of The Subject. When The Predicate Merely Unfolds Or Analyses The Meaning Of The Subject, The Pro Position Is Called "explicative." (when The Predicate Is A Genus Or Differentia Of ...

Amplification Factor Of A
Amplification Factor Of A Vacuum Tube, A Quantity Which Is Used To Express The Relative Effects Of The Grid Voltage And Plate Voltage In Affecting The Plate Current Of A Vacuum Tube. The Amplification Factor Is The Change In Plate Potential Divided By The Negative Change In Grid Potential Under ...

Amplification
Amplification. In Radio Communication Amplification May Be Considered As A Magnification Or Enlargement Of Energy Which Takes Place In An Electrical Circuit. It Is A F Unction By Which The Intensity Of The Electrical Variations In The Output Cir Cuit Are Increased Without Altering Their Wave Forms. Amplifica Tion Is ...

Amplifiers
Amplifiers. The Function Of An Amplifier Is To Increase The Intensity Of Electrical Or Other Fluctuations Without Seriously Altering Their Wave Form. Amplifiers Are Used Extensively In Elec Trical Communication And Also For Rendering Perceptible Sounds And Other Vibrational Waves That Could Not Otherwise Be Observed. In Telephony The Carbon ...

Amplitude
Amplitude, The Extreme Range Of A Fluctuating Quantity. In Mathematics And Physics The Word Is Generally Used In Con Nection With Periodic Functions Or Motions And Denotes The Max Imum Difference Or Displacement From The Mean Value (sometimes Called The Semi-amplitude Since The Whole Range Is Double) . In Navigation ...

Ampsanctus Or Amsanctus
Ampsanctus Or Amsanctus (mod. Sorgente Me Fita), A Small Lake In The Territory Of The Hirpini, Iom. S.e. Of Aeclanum, Close To The Via Appia. There Are Now Two Small Pools Which Exhale Carbonic Acid Gas And Sulphuretted Hydrogen. A Temple Of The Goddess Mephitis Had A Cave With Suffocating ...

Ampthill
Ampthill, Urban District, Bedfordshire, England, 44m. N.n.w. Of London By The L.m.s.r. Pop. (1931) 2,167: It Lies On The Southern Slope Of A Low Range Of Hills, In A Well-wooded Dis Trict. The Church Of St. Andrew Contains A Monument To Richard Nicolls Who Received The Submission Of New Amster ...

Ampulla
Ampulla, A Small, Narrow Necked, Round-bodied Vase For Holding Liquids, Especially Oil And Perfumes. It Was Used In Ancient Times For Toilet Purposes And An Ointing Corpses, Being Then Buried With Them. Gildas Mentions Am Pullae As Used By The Britons In His Time, And St. Columba Is Said To ...

Amputation
Amputation Means The Removal Of A Part Of The Body. In A More Restricted Sense The Term Is Applied To The Removal Of A Part Or The Whole Of A Limb In Continuity. The Conditions Under Which Amputation Becomes Necessary Are : ( R) Injury, (z) Gan Grene, (3) Infection, ...

Amram
Amram (died 875), A Famous Gaon Or Head Of The Jewish Academy Of Sura (persia) In The 9th Century. He Was Author Of Many "responsa," But His Chief Work Was Liturgical. He Was The First To Arrange A Complete Liturgy For The Synagogue, And His Prayer Book (siddur Rab `amram) ...

Amraoti
Amraoti, A Town And District Of India In Berar, Central Provinces. The District Was Reconstituted In 1905, When That Of Ellichpur Was Incorporated With It. The Town (pop., 46,832 In 1931) Is The Richest Town Of Berar, With The Most Numerous And Substantial Commercial Population. It Possesses A Branch Of ...

Amritsar
Amritsar, A City And District Of British India. The City, The Wealthiest In The Punjab, Had In 1931 A Population Of 264,840, Mostly Muslim And Hindu. About 200 Looms Are Engaged In The Carpet-making Industry; An Entrepot Trade In Piece Goods And A Large Business In Skins And Hides Are ...

Amroha
Amroha, A Town Of British India, In The Moradabad Dis Trict Of The United Provinces ; Noteworthy For The Tomb Of Sheikh Saddu, A Mohammedan Saint. Pop. ...

Amrum Or Amrom
Amrum Or Amrom, A German Island In The North Sea, Off The Coast Of Schleswig-holstein, South Of Sylt. Pop. (1925) 858. It Is 6m. Long And 3m. Broad, With An Area Of Iolsq.m., And Is Reached From The Mainland By A Regular Steamboat Service To Wittdiin; Or At Low Water ...

Amsterdam Island
Amsterdam Island, An Uninhabited Island In The Indian Ocean, In 3 7 ° 47' S. And 7 7 ° 34' E., About 4om. N. Of St. Paul Island And Approximately Midway Between The Cape Of Good Hope And Tasmania. It Is A Nearly Extinct Volcano Rising 2,989ft. From The Sea. ...

Amsterdam
Amsterdam, The Chief City Of Holland, In The Province Of North Holland, On The South Side Of The Y Or Ij, An Arm Of The Zuider Zee, In 22' N. And 4° 53' East. Pop. 757,386. It Has Communications By Railway And Canal In Every Direction; Steam-tramways Connect It With ...

Amsterdam_2
Amsterdam, The Only City Of Montgomery County, N.y., U.s.a., On The North Bank Of The Mohawk River, About 33m. N.w. Of Albany. It Is On The Main Line Of The New York Central Rail Road, The State Barge Canal And The Direct Highway Between Xrew York And Buffalo; And Is ...

Amul Or Amol
Amul Or Amol, A Town Of Persia, In The Province Of Ma Zandaran, 23m. S.w. Of Balfrush. Pop. About Io,000. It Is Situated On Both Banks Of The Heraz River, And Is An Important "fall-line" Town Between The Elburz Mountains Of The South And The Low Shore-land Of The Caspian ...

Amulet
Amulet, A Charm, Generally, But Not Invariably, Hung From The Neck, To Protect The Wearer Against Witchcraft, Sickness, Acci Dents, Etc. (late Lat. Amuletum, Origin Unknown). Amulets Have Been Of Many Different Kinds, And Formed Of Different Sub Stances—stones, Metals And Strips Of Parchment Being The Most Common, With Or ...

Amur Province
Amur Province, A Part Of The Far Eastern Area Of The Russian S.f.s.r. Area 236,785sq.km. Pop. (1926) (urban 75,588). Its Boundaries Are, On The South, The Amur River, On The West And North-west Zei Province, On The East And North-east Nikolaievsk Province And Khaborovsk Province. It Includes The Broad Fertile ...

Amur
Amur, The Chief River Of Eastern Asia North Of The Hwang-ho And About 3,00o Miles In Length. It Traverses From West To East A Series Of Tilted Earth-blocks Which Present A Steep Face To The South-east And A Gentle Back-slope To The North-west. The Course Of The River Is, Therefore, ...

Amurath
Amurath: See Murad. A M Y G D A L I N (gr. A,uvy36xrj, Almond) , A Glucoside C20h27n011, Was Isolated From Bitter Almonds By H. E. Robi Quet And A. F. Boutron-charlard In 1830, And Subsequently Investigated By Liebig And Wohler, And Others. It Is Extracted From Almond Cake ...

Amyl Acetate
Amyl Acetate, A Colourless, Neutral, Mobile Liquid Re Sembling Jargonelle Pears In Odour. Hence Its Use As An Essence In The Manufacture Of "peardrops." Owing To Its Solvent Action In Cellulose, Cellulose Esters (q.v.) Etc., It Is Also Used In Photography, In The Celluloid And Varnish Industries, In The Preparation ...

Amyl Alcohols
Amyl Alcohols. There Are Eight Of These Alcohols Theoretically Possible. All Are Known, And The Most Important Is Zsobutyl Carbinol (or Isoamyl Alcohol), The Chief Constituent Of Fermentation Amyl Alcohol, And Consequently Present In Fusel Oil (q.v.) . It Can Be Extracted From Fusel Oil By Shaking This With Strong ...

Amyl Nitrite
Amyl Nitrite (isoamyl Nitrite), A Liquid Which Finds Application In Medicine, Since It Reduces Blood Pressure And Re Tards The Pulse. It Is Prepared By Passing Nitrous Fumes (from Starch And Concentrated Nitric Acid) Into Warm Isoamyl Alcohol; Or By Distilling A Mixture Of 26 Parts Of Potassium Nitrite In ...

Amymone
Amymone, In Ancient Greek Legend, Daughter Of Danaiis. With Her Sisters, She Had Been Sent To Look For Water, The District Of Argos Being Then Parched Through The Anger Of Poseidon. Amymone Having Thrown Her Spear At A Stag, Missed It, But Hit A Satyr Asleep In The Brake. The ...

Amyntas I
Amyntas I., King Of Macedonia (c. B.c.), Was A Tributary Vassal Of Darius 'hystaspes And The First Macedonian Ruler To Have Relations With Other Countries. He Made An Alli Ance With The Peisistratidae, And When Hippias Was Driven Out Of Athens He Offered Him The Territory Of Anthemus On The ...

Amyntas Ii Or Iii
Amyntas Ii. Or Iii., King Of Macedonia From 393 (or 389) To 369 B.c. He Came To The Throne After The Ten Years Of Con Fusion Which Followed The Death Of Archelaus, And Showed The Same Taste For Greek Culture And Its Representatives. In 383 B.c. He Was Driven Out ...

Ana
Ana, A Town On The Euphrates In 34°3o' N. And 42° L., 192m. Below Deir, And 119 Above Hit. The Town Has Retained Its Name At Least Since The Beginning Of The End Millennium B.c., But The Actual Site Seems To Have Changed Slightly. The Earlier Writers Describe It As ...

Anabaptists
Anabaptists, A Name Given By Their Enemies To Various Sects Which Denied The Validity Of Infant Baptism And For Other Reasons Became Prominent In Germany And Elsewhere During The Period Of The Reformation. (gr. Avaf3asrri Cw, Rebaptize.) So Used, The Word Is Too Well Known To Be Discarded, Though It ...

Anabasis
Anabasis, The Title Given By Xenophon (q.v.) To His Narra Tive Of The Expedition Of Cyrus The Younger Against His Brother, Artaxerxes Of Persia, 401 B.c., And Adopted By Arrian For His History Of The Expedition Of Alexander The Great (gr. Av63aats, A March Up Country). ...

Anabolism
Anabolism, The Biological Term For The Building Up In An Organism Of Snore Complex From Simpler Substances, Constructive Metabolism. (see Biology ; Physiology.) ...

Anacharsis
Anacharsis (c. 600 B.e.), A Scythian Philosopher, The Son Of A Chief Of A Nomadic Tribe Of The Euxine Shores And A Greek Woman. He Went On An Embassy To Athens About 58g B.c. And Became Acquainted With Solon, And It Is Said That He Was Initiated Into The Eleusinian ...

Anachronism
Anachronism, A Neglect Or Falsification, Whether Wilful Or Undesigned, Of Chronological Relation (gr. Ava,back, And Xpovos, Time). Its Commonest Use Is In The Ante-dating Of Events, Cir Cumstances, Or Customs; I.e., In The Introduction, Especially In Works Of Imagination That Rest On A Historical Basis, Of Details Borrowed From A ...

Anacoluthon
Anacoluthon, A Defectively Constructed Sentence Which Does Not Run On As A Continuous Whole. When A Writer Or Speaker Is Full Of His Subject, Or Is Carried Rapidly Along By The Passion Of The Moment, Such Inconsequents Are Very Apt To Occur. Of Niebuhr It Is Told That His Oral ...

Anaconda Copper Mining Company
Anaconda Copper Mining Company, An American Company, Incorporated In 1895 To Succeed The Anaconda Mining Company; It Has, Through The Acquisition Of Various Min Ing And Fabricating Companies In The United States And Elsewhere, Developed Into The World's Premier Company In The Non-ferrous Metal Industry. Directly, Or Through Its Subsidiary ...

Anaconda
Anaconda, A City Of Montana, U.s.a., 26 M. N.w. Of Butte, At An Elevation Of 5,30o Ft.; The County Seat Of Deer Lodge County. The Population In 193o Was The Butte, Anaconda And Pacific (electric) Railway Connects The City With Butte And With The Northern Pacific, The Great Northern, The ...

Anaconda_2
Anaconda (eunectes Murinus), An Aquatic Boa, Inhabit Ing The Swamps And Rivers Of Brazil, Northeastern Peru And The Guianas In South America. It Is The Largest Of American Snakes And Rivals The Reticulated Python As The Largest Snake In The World. Exaggerated Tales Have Been Told By Travellers Of Its ...

Anacortes
Anacortes, A City And A Port Of Entry In Skagit County, Wash., U.s.a., Occupying The Upper End Of Fidalgo Island, About 2om. S. By W. Of Bellingham In A Direct Line. It Is Connected With The Mainland By The Great Northern Railway And The San Juan Extension Of The Pacific ...

Anacreon
Anacreon, Greek Lyric Poet, Was Born About 56o B.c., At Teos, An Ionian City On The Coast Of Asia Minor. Little Is Known Of His Life, Except A Few Scattered Notices, Not In All Cases Certainly Authentic. He May Have Shared The Voluntary Exile Of The Mass Of His Fellow-townsmen, ...

Anacreontics
Anacreontics (from The Name Of The Greek Pout Anac Reon), The Title Given To Short Lyrical Pieces, Of An Easy Kind, Deal Ing With Love And Wine. The English Word Appears To Have Been First Used In 1656 By Abraham Cowley, Who Called A Section Of His Poems "anacreontiques," Because ...

Anadyomene
Anadyomene, A Common Greek Epithet Of Aphro Dite (venus), Expressive Of Her Having Sprung From The Foam Of The Sea (from The Greek Anaduoniene, "rising"). In A Famous Picture By Apelles She Was Represented As Having Just Emerged From The Sea And In The Act Of Wringing Her Tresses. This ...

Anaemia
Anaemia, A Generic Term For Various Forms Of Disease Characterized By A Defective Constitution Of The Blood, Or, More Specifically, By A Reduction In The Oxygen-carrying Power Of The Blood. This Reduction Is Due, Either To A Decrease In The Number Of Red Blood Corpuscles, Or To A Decrease In ...

Anaesthesia
Anaesthesia And Anaesthetics, Terms Used In Medicine To Describe A State Of Local Or General Insensibility To External Impressions, And The Substances Used For Inducing This State. In Diseases Of The Brain Or Spinal Cord Anaesthesia Is An Occasional Symptom, But In Such Cases It Is Usually Limited In Extent, ...

Anagnia
Anagnia (mod. Anagni) ; Pop. (1931), Town 5,901, Com Mune 11,930; An Ancient Town Of The Hernici, On A Hill (1,558ft.) Above The Valley Of Trerus And Via Labicana, Italy. Its Posi Tion In A Fertile District Soon Gave It Importance, And It Became The Seat Of The Assembly Of ...

Anagram
Anagram, The Result Of Transposing The Letters Of A Word Or Words In Such A Manner As To Produce Other Words That Possess Meaning (gr. Ava Back, And To Write). The Construction Of Anagrams Is An Amusement Of Great Antiquity, Its Invention Being Ascribed Without Authority To The Jews, Probably ...

Anaheim
Anaheim, A City Of Orange County, California, U.s.a., 25 M. S.e. Of Los Angeles. It Is Served By The Santa Fe, The Southern Pacific, And The Union Pacific Railways, And By A Net Work Of Highways. The Population Was 5,526 In 1920; And Was In 1930. It Lies In A ...

Anahuac
Anahuac, A Geographical District Of Mexico, Limited By The Traditional And Vaguely Defined Boundaries Of An Ancient Indian Empire Or Confederation Of That Name Previous To The Spanish _ Conquest. The Word Signifies "country By The Waters" In The Old Aztec Language ; Hence The Theory That Anahuac Was Located ...

Anakrusis
Anakrusis, From The Greek, Meaning Literally "up Beat," Has Been Defined In Poetry As, "a Syllable At The Beginning Of A Verse Before The Just Rhythm"; Otherwise, An Introductory Weak Accent Preceding A Strong One. In Music The Term Is Similarly Applied To The Notes On The Weak Beats Of ...

Analcime
Analcime, A Common Mineral Of The Zeolite Group. It Crystallizes In The Cubic System, The Common Form Being The Icositetrahedron (2 I I ), Either Alone Or In Combination With The Cube (foo) . The Crystals Are Often Perfectly Colourless And Trans Parent With A Brilliant Glassy Lustre, But Some ...

Analgesia
Analgesia Is The Name Given To The Loss Of The Sensation Of Pain, And Is Due To An Interruption Of The Nervous Pathway Between Skin And Brain. Different Forms Of Sensation From One Area Of Skin, Such As Touch, Temperature, And Pain, Travel To The Spinal Cord By Different Nerve ...

Analogy
Analogy. Originally The General Term Analogy Appears To Have Been Used In The Sense Of "proportion," And So Confined To Quantitative Relationships. Thus, For Instance, The Relation Between Three And Four Would Be Described As Analogous To That Between Nine And I 2 ; Or, More Generally, The Relation Between ...

Analysis Situs Position Analysis
Analysis Situs (position Analysis). In This Branch Of Mathematics Shape And Size Are Unimportant. The Im Portant Property May Be Said, Roughly, To Be Proximity; To State It In Precise Terms, We Must Introduce The Idea Of Limit Point. Let S Denote The Collection Of All Points In The Euclidean ...

Analysis
Analysis, In General, The Resolution Of A Whole Into Its Component Elements; Opposed To Synthesis, The Combining Of Separate Elements Or Minor Wholes Into An Inclusive Unity. Both Analysis And Synthesis May Be Either Purely Mental Or Physical. The Analysis And Synthesis Carried Out In Psychology, For In Stance, Are ...

Analyst
Analyst, In Modern Times, A Person Who Is Professionally Skilled In Chemical Analysis. He May Be Called Upon In The Dis Charge Of His Professional Duties To Analyse A Very Wide Range Of Substances And Report Thereon With Regard To Their Composition Or Their Purity. Apart From Private Practitioners, Analysts ...

Analytic Geometry Othertypes
Analytic Geometry - Other Types Of A Co-ordinate Need Not Be A Distance. In One Dimension, A Point P Of A Line Can Also Be Specified, For Example, By Choosing Two Points Of Reference A, B, And Determining P By The Co Ordinate X = A P/pb, Which Is A ...

Analytic Geometry Threeor
Analytic Geometry - Three Or More Dimensions In Three Dimensions, A Point Requires Three Co-ordinates; A Single Equation Between Them Represents A Surface. For A Curve, Two Equations At Least Are Necessary; Since Each By Itself Gives A Surface, The Points Whose Co-ordinates Satisfy Both Equations Are Those Lying On ...

Analytic Geometry Transformations
Analytic Geometry - Transformations A Co-ordinate Is Always Measured With Respect To A Fixed Origin Or Base Or Frame Of Reference Of Some Sort. The Analytical Method Gains By Choosing The Frame So As To Simplify The Treatment Of The Problem In Hand, And In Particular To Take Advantage Of ...

Analytic Geometry
Analytic Geometry. When Descartes First Came Upon The Idea Of Co-ordinates, A Link Was Made Between The Sciences Of Geometry And Analysis. Now The Connection Has Grown So Close That The Results Of Either Can Be Passed Over To The Other By Definite Laws Of Interpretation. In What Follows, A ...

Analytic
Analytic, Of Or Pertaining To Analysis ; The Method Of Separating A Whole Into Its Parts, The Opposite Of Synthetic. For Analytic Chemistry, Analytic Language, Etc., See The Articles Under The Noun-headings. The Title Of Analytics Was Given By Aristotle To His Treatises On Logic. ...

Anamalai Hills
Anamalai Hills (anaimalai), A Range Of Mountains In Southern India, In The Coimbatore District Of Madras, Lying Between Io° 13' And Io° 31' N., And Between 76° 52' And 77° 23' E., Forming A Portion Of The Western Ghats, South Of The Palghat Pass. They Consist Of A Forest-clad And ...

Anamorphosis
Anamorphosis (an"a-mor'fo-sis) [gr.], A Deformation Or Distortion Of Appearance In Drawing, The Representation Of An Object As Seen; For Instance, As Altered By Reflection In A Mirror; In Botany, E.g., In The Case Of Fungi Or Lichens, An Abnormal Change Giving The Appearance Of A Different Species. ...

Anan Ben David
Anan Ben David, A Persian Jew Of The 8th Century, And Founder Within Judaism Of The Sect Of Qaraites (karaites) Which Set Itself In Opposition To The Rabbinic Tradition. 'allan Ben David Was An Unsuccessful Candidate For The Dignity Of Exilarch, And Thus His Opposition To The Rabbanite Jews Was ...

Ananda
Ananda, One Of The Principal Disciples Of The Buddha (q.v.), Known As The Beloved Disciple Of The Buddhist Story. According To The Commentaries He Was The Son Of Amitodana, An Uncle Of The Buddha, Entered The Order In The Second Year Of The Buddha's Ministry, And In The 25th Year ...

Ananias
Ananias, The Greek Form Of Hananiah Or Ananiah, A Not Uncommon Name In The Bible. Best Known Are (i ) A Member Of The First Christian Community Who, With His Wife Sapphira, Was Punished By Peter With Sudden Death For Falsehood (acts V. 1-10; Cf. Josh. Vii.) . A Disciple ...

Ananke
Ananke ('av6,7k7i), Necessity Or Fate Personified. She Is Fairly Prominent In Posthomeric Literature And Theological Specu Lation, Particularly Orphic, But Is Definitely Known To Emerge Into Cult Only At Corinth, Where She Was Worshipped With Bia (might, Force); See Pausanias, Ii., 4, 6; There Are One Or Two Faint And ...

Anantapur
Anantapur, A Town And District Of India, In The Madras Presidency. The Town Has A Station On The Madras Railway, 62m. S.e. From Bellary. Pop. (1931) 15,099. The District Of Anantapur Was Constituted In 1882 Out Of The Unwieldy District Of Bellary. It Has An Area Of 6,741 Sq.m., And ...

Anapa
Anapa, A Port On The Black Sea, North Of Novorossisk, In The North Caucasian Area Of The R.s.f.s.r., 44° 58' N. 18' E. It Was Formerly The Scene Of Struggles Between The Turks And Rus Sians, Until It Became Russian In 1829. The Fortifications Were Dis Mantled By The Russians ...

Anapaest
Anapaest, A Metrical Foot Consisting Of Three Syllables, The First Two Short And The Third Long (from Gr. Anapaistos, Beaten Upwards). An Anapaestic Verse Is One Which Contains Only Or Mostly Anapaests. In Greek Tragedy, A Passage In This Metre Denotes A Marching Movement Of The Chorus Or An Actor. ...

Anaphrodisiacs
Anaphrodisiacs Are Agents Used To Allay Sexual Desire. In General Mild Sedatives May Accomplish This Effect, Such As Bro Mides Or Luminal. Avoidance Of A Diet Rich In Meats And Spices, And Especially Of Intoxicating Beverages, Is Important. Epsom Salts In The Usual Purgative Doses May Be Of Service. Failing ...

Anaphylaxis
Anaphylaxis, The State Of Exaggerated Susceptibility Of An Animal Or Man To A Biologically Foreign Protein Which May Follow A First Injection Of That Protein. Richet, Who First Used The Term In 1893, Found That After Two Properly Spaced Injections Of An Animal With Eel Serum, The Second Dose Produced ...

Anarchism
Anarchism, The Name Given To A Principle Or Theory Of Life And Conduct Under Which Society Is Conceived Without Gov Ernment (from Gr. Av- And Apxs, Without Authority)—harmony In Such A Society Being Obtained, Not By Submission To Law, Or By Obedience To Any Authority, But By Free Agreements Concluded ...

Anastasius I
Anastasius I. (c. 430-518), Roman Emperor, Was Born At Dyrrhachium Not Later Than A.d. 43o. At The Time,of The Death Of Zeno (491), Anastasius, A Palace Official (silentiarius), Bore A Very High Character, And Was Raised To The Throne Of The Roman Empire Of The East, Through The Choice Of ...

Anastasius Ii
Anastasius Ii., Pope From 496 To 498. He Lived In The Time Of The Schism Of Acacius Of Constantinople. He Showed Some Tend Ency Towards Conciliation, And Thus Brought Upon Himself The Lively Reproaches Of The Author Of The Liber Pontificalis. On The Strength Of This Tradition, Dante Has Placed ...

Anastasius Iii
Anastasius Iii., Pope From G I I To 913, Was A Roman By Birth. Practically Nothing Is Recorded Of Him, Except That He Took An Active Part In Determining The Ecclesiastical Divisions Of Germany, His Pontificate Falling In The Period When Rome Was In The Power Of The Roman Nobles. ...

Anastasius Ii_2
Anastasius Ii. (d. 721), Roman Emperor In The East, Whose Original Name Was Artemius, Was Raised To The Throne Of Constantinople In A.d. 713, On The Deposition Of Philippicus, Whom He Had Served In The Capacity Of Secretary. Anastasius Sent An Army Under Leo The Isaurian, Afterwards Emperor, To Defend ...