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Encyclopedia Britannica Volume 3 Baltimore - Braila

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Baron De Brugiere
Brugiere, Baron De (1782-1866), French Statesman And Historian, The Son Of An Advocate, Was Born At Riom On June I O, 1782. He Held Numerous Important Administrative Posts Under The First Empire And Under The Restoration. After The Revolution Of 183o He Was Ambassador At Turin And At St. Petersburg ...

Baron
Baron. This Word, Of Uncertain Origin, Was Introduced Into England At The Conquest To Denote "the Man" (i.e., One Who Had Done Him "homage") Of A Great Lord, And More Especially Of The King. All Who Held "in Chief" (i.e., Directly) Of The King Were Alike Barones Regis, Bound To ...

Baronet
Baronet. Although The Origin Of This Title Has Been The Subject Of Speculation, It Is Not Known Why It Was Selected As That Of "a New Dignitie Between Barons And Knights" Created By James I. The Object Of Its Institution Was To Raise Money For The Crown, As Was Also ...

Barons War
Barons War, The Name Given In English History To The Civil War Of 1263-1267. In 1261 Henry Iii. Had Been Absolved By The Pope From His Oath To The Provisions Of Oxford (1258), Which King Louis Of France By The Mise Of Amiens (jan. 23, 1264), Further Declared To Be ...

Barony
Barony, The Domain Of A Aaron (q.v.). In Ireland Counties Are Divided Into "baronies," Which Are Equivalent To The "hun Dreds" (q.v.) In England, And Seem To Have Been Formed Out Of The Territories Of The Irish Chiefs, As Each Submitted To English Rule (general Report Of The Census Of ...

Baroque Architecture
Baroque Architecture. So Many Different Fac Tors Both Of Technique And Thought Went To The Making Of Baroque Art That, Not So Many Years Ago, When Comparing It With The Art Of Other Periods, Critics Condemned It As False, Over-emphasized And Seeking Only To Astonish. "its Architecture," They Asserted, "was ...

Baroque
Baroque, A Term Used To Describe The Tendencies Prevailing In European Art During Part Of The 16th, The 17th And The First Half Of The 18th Centuries. It Is Of Uncertain Derivation, One Ex Planation Being That It Springs From The Spanish Word Barrueco, A Large Irregularly-shaped Pearl. The Word ...

Barotac Nuevo
Barotac Nuevo, A Municipality (with Administration Centre And 20 Barrios Or Districts) Of The Province Of Iloilo, Panay, Philippine Islands, Near The Jalaur River, Above Its Mouth On The South-east Coast, And About 15m. N.e. Of Iloilo, The Capital. Pop. (1918), 13,299, Of Whom 6,590 Were Males And Three Whites. ...

Barotseland Barotse
Barotse, Barotseland, A People And Country Of South Central Africa. The Greater Part Of The Country Is A British Protectorate, Forming Part Of Northern Rhodesia. The Barotse Are The Paramount Tribe In The Region Of The Upper Zam Bezi Basin, But By Popular Usage The Name Is Also Applied To ...

Barquisimeto
Barquisimeto, A City Of Western Venezuela, Capital Of The State Of Lara, On The Barquisimeto River, Ioim. By Rail S.w. Of Tucacas, Its Port On The Caribbean Coast. Pop. (census Of 1926) 23,109. It Is Built In A Small, Fertile Valley Of The Merida Cordilleras, 1,985ft. Above Sea-level, Has A ...

Barra Or Barray
Barra Or Barray (scand. Baraey, Isle Of The Ocean), Island, Outer Hebrides, Inverness-shire, Scotland. Pop. (1931), 2,25o. It Lies About 5m. S.w. Of South Uist And Is 8m. Long And From 2 To 4m. Wide, Save At The Sandy Isthmus 2m. Below Scur Rival Point, Where It Is Only A ...

Barrackpore
Barrackpore, A Town And Subdivisional Headquarters Of British India, In The District Of Twenty-four Parganas, Bengal. The Town, Situated On The Left Bank Of The Hooghly, Is Divided Between Two Municipalities, North Barrackpore, With A Population (1931) Of 16,258, And South Barrackpore (pop. 25,395). It Con Tains A Cantonment And ...

Barracks
Barracks, The Buildings Used For The Accommodation Of Military Or Naval Forces, Including The Quarters For Officers, Warrant Officers, Non-commissioned Officers And Men, With Their Messes And Recreation Establishments, Regimental Offices, Shops, Stores, Stables, Vehicle Sheds And Other Accessory Buildings For Military Or Domestic Purposes. The Term Is Usually Applied ...

Barracuda
Barracuda, A Predatory, Pike-shaped Fish Of The Family Sphyraenidae. It Has Long, Pointed Jaws Filled With Teeth Of Razor Like Sharpness And Ranges In Length From 3ft. To 8 Feet. Of About 20 Species Inhabiting The Warmer Seas, The Giant Australian Mullet And The Great Picuda Or Becuna Are Thought ...

Barrage
Barrage, A Term Used By Engineers For The Construction Of A Dam Across A River, Checking The Flow And So Deepening The Current Or Even Creating A Lake. In A Military Sense The Term Is Used Of The Continuous Line Of Artillery Fire Intended To Hold Up The Advance Of ...

Barranquilla
Barranquilla, A City And Port Of Colombia, South America, Capital Of A Province Of The Same Name In The Department Of Atlantico, On The Left Bank Of The Magdalena River About 7 M. Above Its Mouth And 182m. By Rail From Its Seaport, Puerto Colombia. Pop. Est.) 129,715. Dangerous Bars ...

Barratry
Barratry, In English And American Law, Is The Indict Able Misdemeanour (more Usually Called Common Barratry) Of Habitually Inciting And Stirring Up Quarrels In Disturbance Of The Peace, Either In Courts Or Elsewhere, And Is Punishable By Fine And Imprisonment. In 8 Co. Rep. 36 It Is Defined As "habitually ...

Barre
Barre, A City Of Washington County, Vt., U.s.a., In The North-central Part Of The State, 7m. S.e. Of Montpelier, On Ste Phens Branch Of The Winooski River. It Is Served By The Central Vermont And The Montpelier And Wells River Railways. The Popu Lation In 192o Was 10,008, 3,30o Foreign-born; ...

Barrel Organ
Barrel-organ, A Small Portable Organ Mechanically Played By Turning A Handle. The Barrel-organ Owes Its Name To The Cylinder On Which The Tunes Are Pricked Out With Pins And Staples Of Various Lengths, Set At Definite Intervals According To The Scheme Required By The Music. The Function Of These Pins ...

Barrel Vault
Barrel Vault, In Architecture, A Continuous Or Tunnel Vault (q.v.), The Cross Section Of Which Is The Same Throughout Its Length; A Continuous Arch (q.v.). ...

Barrel
Barrel, A Vessel Of Cylindrical Shape, Made Of Staves Bound Together By Hoops, A Cask; Also A Dry And Liquid Measure Of Capacity, Varying With The Commodity Which It Contains (see Weights And Measures). It Is A Word Of Uncertain Origin Com Mon To Romance Languages. The Term Barrel Is ...

Barren Island
Barren Island, A Volcanic Island Lying Off The Anda Mans In The Bay Of Bengal. It Is Irregularly Circular And About 2m. In Diameter, With An Outer Rim 70o To I,000ft. In Height And A Central Cone I,o15ft. High. This Cone Rises From A Depth Of Boo Fathoms Below The ...

Barrhead
Barrhead, Police Burgh, Renfrewshire, Scotland, On The Levern, 71m. S.w. Of Glasgow By The L.m.s. Railway. Pop. (1931) 12,308. Founded In 1773, It Has Absorbed Arthurlie, Dove Cothall And Grahamston. It Does Bleaching, Calico-printing, Cotton Spinning, Weaving, Iron And Brass Founding, Engineering And The Manufacture Of Sanitary Appliances. Neilston (pop. ...

Barricade Or Barricado
Barricade Or Barricado, An Improvised Fortifica Tion Of Earth, Paving-stones, Trees Or Any Materials Ready To Hand, Thrown Up, Especially Across A Street, To Hinder The Advance Of An Enemy; In The Old Wooden Warships A Fence Or Wooden Rail, Supported By Stanchions And Strengthened By Various Materials, Extending Across ...

Barrie
Barrie, Capital Of Simcoe County, Ontario, Canada, 56m. N. Of Toronto, On Lake Simcoe, An Important Centre On The Canadian National Railway. It Contains Several Manufactories And Is Also A Summer Resort. Pop. (1931) 7,776. ...

Barrier Act
Barrier Act, An Act Passed By The General Assembly Of The Church Of Scotland In 1697 Guarding Against Hasty Legisla Tion By The Provision That Acts Involving A Change In The Church Law Must Be Approved By The Presbyteries And By The General Assembly. ...

Barrier Reef
Barrier Reef. The Great Barrier Reef, The Largest Con Tinuous Mass Of Coral In The World, Lies Off The North-east Coast Of Australia And Extends Virtually From New Guinea South Of The Fly River Delta (bramble Cay : 9° 15' S., 153° 20' E.) To About Sandy Cape (24° 30' ...

Barrier Treaty
Barrier Treaty, The Name Given First To The Treaty Signed On Oct. 29, 1709, Between Great Britain And The States General Of The United Netherlands, By Which The Latter Engaged To Guarantee The Protestant Succession In England In Favour Of The House Of Hanover; While Great Britain Undertook To Procure ...

Barrister
Barrister, In England And Ireland The Term Applied To The Highest Class Of Lawyers Who Have Exclusive Audience In All The Superior Courts. Every Barrister In England Must Be A Member Of One Of The Four Ancient Societies Called Inns Of Court, Viz., Lincoln's Inn, The Inner And Middle Temples, ...

Barrow In Furness
Barrow-in-furness, Municipal, County And Parlia Mentary Borough, Lancashire, England, 2641 M. N.w. By N. From London, On The L.m.s. Railway. Pop. (1891) 51,712 ; (1931) 66,366. It Lies On The Seaward Side Of The Peninsula Forming Part Of The District Of Furness, Between The Estuary Of The Duddon And Morecambe ...

Barrow
Barrow, A River Of South-eastern Ireland. It Rises In The Slieve Bloom Mountains, And Flows Eastward And Then Almost Due South, To Form The Estuary Known As Waterford Harbour. Includ Ing The I 2m. Of The Estuary, The Length Of Its Valley Is Rather More Than I Oo Miles. The ...

Barrow_2
Barrow. The Origin Of Barrow-making Is Unknown. The Earliest Deliberate Burials Occurred In The Mousterian Period, In Caves; And Although Connecting Links Are Not Numerous, The Natural Cave Must Have Been The Ancestor Of The Megalithic Pas Sage-grave. In All Essentials The Cave And The Passage-grave Are The Same ; ...

Barry
Barry, Urban District, Glamorganshire, Wales, 8 M. S.w. From Cardiff On The Bristol Channel. The Population In 1931 Was 38,916. A Small Brook Named Barri Runs Here Into The Sea, Whence The Place Was Formerly Known In Welsh As Aber-barri; But The Name Of Both The River And The Island ...

Barry_2
Barry, A Term In Heraldry For A Transverse Division Of The Shield Into Equal Partitions ; This Is Termed "harry Of Six (eight Or Ten) Pieces," According To The Number Of The Divisions. The Term Barry-bendy Is Used When The Transverse Lines (barways) Are Crossed By Vertical Lines (bendways). ...

Barsi
Barsi, A Town Of British India, In The Sholapur District Of Bombay, Lying Within A Tract Entirely Surrounded By The Nizam's Dominions. Pop. (193 R) 27,61o. Barsi Is A Flourishing Centre Of Trade, Exporting To Bombay Large Quantities Of Cotton And Oil Seeds. There Are Oil And Cotton Mills. It ...

Bartenstein
Bartenstein, A Town In The Konigsberg District Of East Prussia, At The Junction Of The Konigsberg–lyck Railway With Branches From North-east And South-west. Pop. (1933) 8,72o. It Is An Agricultural Centre With Some Wool-spinning. ...

Barter
Barter, The Term Used To Describe The Direct Exchange Of Commodities Without The Use Of A Medium Of Exchange. Barter Still Exists In The Interior Of Africa And Of South America. Barter From Fr. Barater, To Exchange, To Truck, Reminds Us That, However The Processes Of Exchange May Be Disguised ...

Barth
Barth, A Town On The Grabow Inlet Of The Baltic Sea, West Of Stralsund, In The Prussian Province Of Pomerania. Pop. (1933) 7,661. Industries Include Shipbuilding And Cabinet-making. ...

Barthelemy
Barthelemy, Francois, Marquis De (1 Q47 Or I 1830), French Politician, Was Elected A Member Of The Directory In May 1797, Through Royalist Influence, But Was Arrested At The Coup D'etat Of The 18 Fructidor (179 7) And Deported To French Guiana, But Escaped. He Returned To France After The ...

Barthez Or Barthes Paul
Barthez Or Barthes Paul Joseph French Physician, Was Born On Dec. Ii, 1734, At Montpellier. He Began The Study Of Medicine At Montpellier In 1750, Taking His Doctor's Degree In 1753. In 1759 He Obtained A Medical Professor Ship At Montpellier, And In 1774 He Was Created Joint Chancellor Of ...

Bartholomaeus Anglicus De Glanvilla
Bartholomaeus Anglicus (de Glanvilla), Eng Lish Franciscan, Who Joined The Order In France. After Studying At Oxford, He Became A Lector At Paris (c. 1220) And Later At Magdeburg (c. 1230), Whither He Was Invited By The General Of The Province Of Saxony. About 1250—not 1350, As Often Stated— He ...

Bartholomew Fair
Bartholomew Fair, A Fair Held In West Smithfield, London, On St. Bartholomew's Day From 1133 To 18j5. The Charter Was Granted By Henry I. To His Former Minstrel, Rahere, Who Had Founded The Priory Of St. Bartholomew. For Centuries The Fair Lasted A Fortnight, But In 1691 It Was Shortened ...

Bartin
Bartin, A Town In The Vilayet Of Zunguldak In Turkey, Re Taining The Name Of The Ancient Village Parthenia And Situated Near The Mouth Of The Bartan-su (anc. Parthenius), Which Formed Part Of The Boundary Between Bithynia And Paphlagonia. The Town, Which Is The Residence Of A Kaimmakam, Is Built ...

Bartizan
Bartizan, A Small Battlemented Turret, Corbelled Out At The Angle Of A Wall Or Tower To Protect A Warder And Enable Him To See Around Him. Bartizans Generally Are Furnished With Ovlets Or Arrow-slits. ...

Bartlesville
Bartlesville, A City In The Midst Of The Oil And Gas Fields Of North-east Oklahoma, U.s.a., On The Caney River, 18m. From The Kansas Line; The County Seat Of Washington County. It Is On Federal Highway 75, Is Served By The Santa Fe And The Missouri-kansas-texas Railways, And Has A ...

Bartolommeo Borghesi
Borghesi, Bartolommeo (1781-186o), Italian An Tiquarian, Was Born At Savignano, Near Rimini, July 11, 1781, And Died At San Marino, April 16 186o. He Studied At Bologna And Rome. His Monumental Work, Nuovi Frammenti Dei Fasti Con Solari Capitolini (1818-2o), Attracted The Attention Of The Learned World As Furnishing Positive ...

Bartolommeo Or Baccio Bandinelli
Bandinelli, Bartolommeo Or Baccio (1493 156o), Florentine Sculptor, The Son Of An Eminent Goldsmith, Who Taught His Son The First Elements Of Drawing. He Was Early Placed Under Rustici, A Sculptor, And A Friend Of Leonardo Da Vinci. The Ruling Motive In His Life Seems To Have Been Jealousy Both ...

Bartolommeo Veneto
Bartolommeo Veneto (c. 1480--15 5 5) , Italian Painter, A Pupil Of Gentile Bellini At Venice, Influenced Later By The Milanese School. He Lived For Some Time At Cremona And Also Worked At Ferrara. Very Little Is Known Of This Painter, Whose Fine Portraits Are Much Sought After And Highly ...

Bartolus
Bartolus 5 7) , Italian Jurist, The Most Famous Master Of The Dialectical School, Was Born At Sassoferrato, Whence His Usual Style Of Bartolus De Saxoferrato. He Studied Law Under Cinus At Perugia And Under Oldradus And Jacobus De Belvisio At Bologna. He Held The Chair Of Law At Perugia ...

Barton Booth
Booth, Barton (1681-1733), English Actor, Who Came Of A Good Lancashire Family, Was Educated At Westminster School, Where His Success In The Latin Play Andria Gave Him An Inclination For The Stage. He Was Intended For The Church; But In 1698 He Ran Away From Trinity College, Cambridge, And Obtained ...

Bartow
Bartow, A City In The Lake Region Of Florida, U.s.a., 45m. East Of Tampa, On The Ridge Running Through The State From North To South; The County Seat Of Polk County. It Is Served By The Atlantic Coast Line And The Seaboard Air Line Railways. The Population In 1925 (state ...

Baruch
Baruch, The Name (meaning "blessed" In Hebrew) Of A Character In The Old Testament (jer. Xxxvi., Xxxvii., Xliii.), Asso Ciated With The Prophet Jeremiah, And Described As His Secretary And Spokesman. ...

Barugo
Barugo, A Municipality (with Administration Centre And 15 Barrios Or Districts) On The North Coast Of The Province And Island Of Leyte, Philippine Islands, On Carigara Bay. Pop. (1918) , 16,187 Of Whom 8,075 Were Males And One Was White. It Exports Large Quantities Of Aback And Copra, And Imports ...

Barwani
Barwani, An Indian State In The Bhopawar Agency Of Central India, In The Satpura Mountains, South Of The Narbada. Area, 1,178 Sq.m. ; Pop. (1931) 141 J I O. Many Of The Inhabitants Are Bhils. The Chief Or Rana, Who Has A Salute Of Nine Guns, Is A Rajput Of ...

Barycentric Calculus
Barycentric Calculus, A System Of Geometric Analysis Developed By August Ferdinand Mobius (q.v.) And Founded On A Generalization Of The Notion Of Centre Of Mass (or Centre Of Gravity) Of A System Of Mass Particles. This Explains The Significance Of The Term "barycentric," From Gr. 0apvs, Barys', Heavy, And E ...

Barytes
Barytes, A Widely Distributed Mineral Composed Of Ba Rium Sulphate (baso,) . Its Most Striking Feature And The One From Which It Derives Its Name Barytes, Barite (from The Greek (3apvs, Heavy) Or Heavy Spar, Is Its Weight. Its Specific Gravity Of 4.5 Is About Twice As Great As That ...

Barytocalcite
Barytocalcite, A Rare Mineral Found Only In The Neighbourhood Of Alston, In Cumberland, Where It Occurs As Diverging Groups Of White Transparent Crystals In Veins Of Lead Ore. The Crystals Belong To The Monoclinic System And Are Usually Prismatic Or Blade-shaped In Habit. The Hardness Is 4, And The Sp. ...

Bar_2
Bar, A Town In The Ukrainian S.s.r. On A Tributary Of The Bug. Lat. 49° 5' N., Long. 27° 38' E. Pop. (1926) 9,431. It Was Rebuilt By Sigismund I. Of Poland After Its Destruction By The Tatars In 1452 And Renamed Bar (formerly Rov) By His Wife Bona Sforza, ...

Bar_3
Bar, In Physical Geography, An Underwater Ridge Of Sand Or Silt Crossing A River Or Harbour. It May Be Raised By Wave Action Above Sea-level. When A River Enters A Tidal Sea Its Rate Of Flow Is Checked, And The Material It Carries In Suspension Is Deposited In A Shifting ...

Basalt
Basalt, In Petrology, One Of The Oldest Rock Names, Sup Posed To Be Derived From An Ethiopian Word Basal, Signifying A Stone Which Yields Iron; According To Pliny, The First Basalts Were Obtained In Ethiopia. In Current Usage The Term Includes A Large Variety Of Types Of Igneous Rock Belonging ...

Base Fee
Base Fee, In Law, A Freehold Estate Of Inheritance, Which Is Limited Or Qualified By The Existence Of Certain Conditions. In Modern Property Law The Commonest Example Of A Base Fee Is An Estate Created By A Tenant In Tail, Not In Possession, Who Bars The Entail Without The Consent ...

Base Hospital
Base Hospital, A Hospital Created And Used By The Government For The Care Of The Sick And Wounded In Time Of War. Such Hospitals Are Located Sufficiently Far From The Firing Lines To Be Permanent And Stationary. The Seriously Wounded Are Removed From The Various Dressing Stations At The Front ...

Base I
Base. (i) An Adjective Meaning Low Or Deep, And, So, Mean, Worthless, Or Wicked (fr. Bas, Late Lat. Bassos, Low) . (2) A Term For A Foundation Or Starting Point, Used In Various Senses; (gr. 1311.crcs "stepping," And So A Foundation Or Pedestal) ; In Sports, As In Baseball; In ...

Baseball
Baseball (so Called From The Bases And Ball) Is A Game Played By Two Teams In Which A Ball, Bat And Bases Are Employed. It Is The National Sport Of The United States Where It Originated. Next To The United States And Canada Baseball Is More Popular In Japan Than ...

Basement
Basement, In A Building, A Storey Partly Below The Sur Rounding Ground Level ; More Loosely The Ground Storey Of A Building When That Storey Is Of Subsidiary Importance. The Term Is Applied Specifically When The Exterior Treatment Of This Storey Is Simpler Or More Rugged Than That Of The ...

Bashahr
Bashahr, A Rajput Hill State, Within The Punjab, Amid The Himalaya Mountains, With An Area Of 3,881 Sq.m. And A Popula Tion In 1931 Of 104,389. The Revenue Is Obtained Chiefly From Land And Forests. The Latter Are Very Valuable. ...

Bashan
Bashan, A District East Of The Jordan Whose Bounds Cannot Be Determined With Accuracy. On The East It Would Seem To Have Been Bounded By Jebel Hauran And Salkhad (salcah) (deut. 1o, Josh. Xii. 4, Xiii. I I), On The South By The River Yarmuk (hier Omax) And A Line ...

Bashkale
Bashkale, A Chief Town Of A Kaimmakamlik In The Vila Yet Of Van In Turkey. It Is A Military Station, Situated At An Elevation Of 7,5ooft. Above Sea-level In The Valley Of The Great Zab, And Is The Centre Of The Hakkiari Kurds. Pop. (1927), ...

Bashkir Republic
Bashkir Republic, An Autonomous Socialist Soviet Republic, Created May 1919. Its Boundaries Are, North And East, The New Area Of Uralsk (centre Sverdlovsk, Formerly Ekaterin Burg And Quite Distinct From The Uralsk Of The Southern Ural Prov Ince) ; South-east And South-west, Orenburg; West, Samara And The Autonomous Tatar S.s.r. ...

Basic Slag
Basic Slag, A By-product Of Steel Manufacture, Is Formed When Phosphatic Ores Are Used In Converters Lined With Lime Or Magnesia, As In The Thomas-gilchrist Or "basic" Process. The Phosphorus Containing Material Of The Ore Combines With The Lin Ing Material Of The Converter To Form Basic Phosphates. This Ma ...

Basil I
Basil I. (d. 886), Known As The "macedonian," Roman Emperor In The East, Was Born Of A Family Of Armenian (not Sla Vonic) Descent, Settled In Macedonia. He Spent A Part Of His Boy Hood In Captivity In Bulgaria, Whither His Family Was Carried By The Bulgarian Prince Krum In ...

Basil Ii
Basil Ii. (c. 958-1025), Known As Bulgaroktonos (slayer Of Bulgarians), Roman Emperor In The East, Son Of Romanus Ii. And Theophano, And Great-great-grandson Of Basil I., Born About 958 And Crowned On April 22, 96o. After Their Father's Death (963) He And His Younger Brother Constantine Were Nominal Emperors During ...

Basil Ii_2
Basil Ii., Called Temny ("the Blind") (1415-62), Son Of The Preceding, Succeeded His Father As Grand-duke Of Moscow In 1425. In 1430 Basil Was Seized By His Uncle, Yury Of Halicz, And Sent A Prisoner To Kostroma, But Basil Was Reinstated With The Con Currence Of The Khan. On The ...

Basil The Great
Basil The Great (c. , Bishop Of Caesarea (and Founder Of Monastic Institutions) Came Of A Famous Family, Which Gave A Number Of Distinguished Supporters To The Church. His Eldest Sister, Macrina, Was Celebrated For Her Saintly Life; His Second Brother Was The Famous Gregory Of Nyssa; His Youngest Was ...

Basil
Basil (russ. Vasily), The Name Of Four Grand-dukes Of Moscow And Tsars Of Muscovy. ...

Basilar Membrane
Basilar Membrane, A Tissue Lying Under The Organ Of Corti In The Cochlea Of The Internal Ear Of The Higher Vertebrates. It Consists Of Transverse Fibres Which Are Not Free But Are Packed Together Tightly Side By Side And Embedded In A Cementing Sub Stance And Covered On Both Upper ...

Basilian Monks
Basilian Monks, Those Who Follow The Rule Of Basil The Great. The Chief Importance Of The Monastic Rule And Insti Tute Of St. Basil Lies In The Fact That To This Day His Reconstruction Of The Monastic Life Is The Basis Of The Monasticism Of The Greek And Slavonic Churches, ...

Basilica
Basilica, A Word Frequently Used In Latin Literature To Designate A Large, Roofed Building Dedicated To Public Use. Mar Kets, Court-houses, Covered Promenades And Meeting Halls Are All Occasionally So Known. Little By Little The Word Was Limited To Buildings Of A More Or Less Definite Form, Having A Central ...

Basilicata
Basilicata, A Territorial Division Of Italy, Comprising The Provinces Of Matera And Potenza, Part Of The Ancient Lucania (q. V.) . It Is Bounded On The North By The Province Of Foggia, North-east By Those Of Bari And Lecce, East By The Gulf Of Taranto (for A Distance Of 24 ...

Basilica_2
Basilica, A Code Of Law, Drawn Up In The Greek Language, With A View To Putting An End To The Uncertainty Which Prevailed Throughout The East Roman Empire In The 9th Century As To The Authorized Sources Of The Law. This Uncertainty Had Been Brought About By The Conflicting Opinions ...

Basilides
Basilides, One Of The Most Celebrated Of The Gnostics (see Gnosticism), Flourished Probably About A.d. 125 In Alex Andria. Very Little Is Known Of His Life ; And Of His Doctrine There Are Two Fundamentally Different Accounts: That Of Irenaeus, In His Great Work Against Heresies, And That Of Hippolytus ...

Basilisk
Basilisk, A Name Given By The Ancients To A Horrid Monster Of Their Own Imagination, To Which They Attributed The Most Ma Lignant Powers And An Equally Fiendish Appearance. The Term Is Now Applied, Owing To A Certain Fanciful Resemblance, To A Genus Of Lizards Belonging To The Family Iguanidae, ...

Basim
Basim, A Town And Subdivision In The Akola District, Berar, India, 52 Miles S.s.e. From Akola Station Of The Great Indian Peninsula Railway. Pop. (1931) 14,409. Until 19o5 It Was The Headquarters Of The District Of Basim Which Had An Area Of Square Miles, But In That Year The District ...

Basin Or Bason
Basin Or Bason, A Round Vessel For Holding Liquids (the Older Form Bacin Is Found In Many Of The Romanic Languages, From The Late Lat. Baccinus Or Bacchinus, Probably Derived From Bacca, A Bowl). Hence The Term Has Various Technical Uses, As Of A Dock Constructed With Flood-gates In A ...

Basin Stand
Basin-stand, A Piece Of Furniture Consisting Of A Small Stand, Usually Supported On Three Legs, And Most Commonly Made Of Mahogany Or Rosewood, For Holding A Wash-hand Basin. The Smaller Varieties Were Used For Rose-water Ablutions, Or For The Operation Of Hair-powdering. The Larger Ones, Which Possessed Sockets For Soap-dishes, ...

Basinet
Basinet, A Diminutive Of "basin" ; A Form Of Helmet Or Headpiece. The Original Small Basinet Was A Light Open Cap, With A Peaked Crown. This Was Used As An Alternative To, Or Even In Con Junction With, The Large Heavy Heaume. But In The Latter Half Of The 13th ...

Basingstoke
Basingstoke, Municipal Borough, Hampshire, England, 48m. W.s.w. Of London. Pop. (comprising Also Eastrop Parish) 13,862 In 1931. The Town Is Placed On The North-east Side Of The Loddon Gap, Where The Chalk Dies Down And Provides An Open Way Between The London And The Hampshire Basins. The Neighbour Hood Is ...

Basket
Basket, A Vessel Made Of Twigs, Cane, Or Rushes, As Well As Of A Variety Of Other Materials, Interwoven Together, And Used For Holding, Protecting Or Carrying Any Commodity. The Process Of Interweaving Twigs, Rushes Or Leaves, Is Practised Among The Rudest Nations Of The World ; And As It ...

Basketball
Basketball Is A Game Played By Two Teams Of Five Men Or Women Each, In A Gymnasium Or Other Large Room. Its Essential Characteristic Is The Effort Of Each Of The Teams To Pass The Ball Through A Hoop Or Goal At The End Of The Court Behind The Opposing ...

Basle
Basle, A Canton Of North Switzerland (ger. Basel; Fr. Bale). It Is Traversed By The Jura, And Watered By The Birs And The Ergolz, Both Tributaries (left) Of The Rhine. From 1803 To 1814 The Canton Was One Of The Six "directorial" Cantons Of The Con Federation. Since 1833 It ...

Basle_2
Basle, The Capital Of The Swiss Half-canton Of Basel Stadt Or Bale Ville. It Is Now The Second Most Populous Town (ranking After Zurich) In The Swiss Confederation, While It Is Reputed To Be The Richest. Pop. (1930) 148,063 ; (with Suburbs) 184,762. Both Facts Are Largely Due To The ...

Basogue Basoque
Basoque, Basogue And Bazouges, A French Gild Of Clerks, From Among Whom Legal Representatives (procureurs) Were Recruited. This Gild Was Very Ancient, Even Older Than The Gild Of The Procureurs, With Which It Was Often At Variance. It Dated, No Doubt, From The Time When The Profession Of Procureur (pro ...

Basque Language
Basque Language. The Original And Proper Name Of The Language Is Eskuara (euskara, Uskara), A Word The Exact Meaning Of Which Has Not Yet Been Ascertained But Which Probably Corresponds With The Idea "clearly Speaking." The Language Is Highly Interesting And Stands As Yet Absolutely Isolated From Other European Linguistic ...

Basque Provinces
Basque Provinces (provincias Vascongadas), A Di Vi'ion Of North-eastern Spain In The Angle Of The Bay Of Biscay, Comprising The Three Provinces Of Alava, Vizcaya Or Biscay And Guipuzcoa. (pop. 1931, 891,71o; Area, 2,739 Square Miles.) The Boundary Of The Basque Provinces Extends South-westwards From The French Frontier At The ...

Basque Provinces_2
Basque Provinces ; For The Language, See Basque Language; For The People See Europe. ...

Basra
Basra (also Spelt Btjsra, The Bassorah Of The Arabian Nights), The Name Of A Vilayet (pop. [ 1920] 785,600) And Of The Third Most Important Town In `iraq And Its Port (pop. [1927], 85,000) . The Original City Was Founded By Caliph Omar In A.d. 636 At Zobeir, About 8m. ...

Bass Clarinet
Bass Clarinet Is Practically The A, Bb, Or C Clarinet Speaking An Octave Lower; What Therefore Has Been Said Concern Ing The Fingering, Transposition, Acoustic Properties, And General History Of The Clarinet (q.v.) Also Applies To The Bass Clarinet. Owing To Its Greater Length The Form Of The Bass Clarinet ...

Bass
Bass, The Name Of A Family Of English Brewers. The Founder Of The Firm, William Bass (b. 172o), Was Originally A Carrier, Who, Seeing The Growing Demand For Burton Beer, Started In 1777 As A Brewer Himself. The Principal Market For Burton Beer At That Time Was In St. Petersburg ...

Bassa
Bassa, District Of Northern Nigeria, Occupying The Angle Made By The Meeting Of The Benue River With The Niger. It Lies South Of The Benue And East Of The Niger. It Is Heavily Forested, And Has Not Been Penetrated By Moslem Influence. The Bassas Are A Remarkable Pagan Race Who ...

Bassano
Bassano, Town Of Venetia, Italy, Province Of Vicenza, 24m. N.e. Of Vicenza And 3om. N. Of Padua, At The Foot Of The Vene Tian Alps. Pop. (1931) Town, 11, 233 ; Commune, 20,527. The Brenta Is Here Spanned By A Covered Wooden Bridge, And Com Mands Fine Views. The I3th ...