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Encyclopedia Brittanica

Volume 4, Part 2: Brain to Casting

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Canoness
Canoness, A Female Beneficiary Of A Religious College. The Title First Occurs In The 8th Century, Applied To Communities Of Women Vowed To Obedience And Chastity, Though Not To Poverty, And Generally Under A Rule Less Strict Than That Of Nuns. The Canonesses Often Taught Girls, And Also Embroidered Ecclesiastical ...

Canonization
Canonization In Its Widest Sense, An Act By Which In The Christian Church The Ecclesiastical Authority Grants To A Deceased Believer The Honour Of Public Cultus. In The Early Church There Was No Formal Canonization. The Cultus Applied At First To Local Martyrs, And It Was Only In Exceptional Circumstances ...

Canonsburg
Canonsburg, A Borough Of Washington County, Penn Sylvania, U.s.a., 17m. S.w. Of Pittsburgh; On Federal Highway 19, And Served By The Pennsylvania Railroad. The Population In 192o Was 10,632, And It Was 12,558 In 193o. It Is In A Rich Farming District, With Coal-mines And Gas-wells Near By. The Borough ...

Canopus Or Canobus
Canopus Or Canobus, Ancient Coast Town Of Lower Egypt, I 5m. E. Of Alexandria, Was The Principal Port In Egypt For Greek Trade Before The Foundation Of Alexandria. The Canopic (westernmost) Branch Of The Nile, Which En Tered The Mediterranean At The Western End Of The Bay Of Aboukir, Is ...

Canopus
Canopus, The Second Brightest Star In The Sky, Situated In The Constellation Carina. It Is In S. Dec. 53 And Therefore Invis Ible From Latitudes Above 37 N. It Is An F Type Star Of Magnitude 0.9. No Sensible Parallax Has Been Detected, And There Is No In Direct Method ...

Canopy
Canopy, A Hood Or Cover, Supported Or Suspended Above An Object; A Tester. The Canopy Over An Altar, When Disconnected From The Wall And Supported On Columns, Is Known As A Baldachino (q.v.), One Suspended From The Ceiling Or Bracketed From The Eastern Wall Is Usually Termed A Tester. The ...

Canosa Di Puglia
Canosa Di Puglia, A Town Of Apulia, Italy (anc. Cann Slum), In The Province Of Bari, On The Right Bank Of The Ofanto (anc. Aufidus), 5o5ft. Above Sea-level, 15m. S.w. Of Barletta By Rail. Pop. (1921) 26,375. It Was Rebuilt By The Normans After Its Devastation By The Saracens In ...

Canossa
Canossa, A Ruined Castle, I,89oft. Above Sea-level, In Emilia, Italy, 12m. S.w. Of Reggio Emilia, Commanding A Fine View Of The Apennines. It Belonged To The Countess Matilda Of Tuscany (d. 1115) And Is Famous As The Scene Of The Penance Performed By The Emperor Henry Iv. Before Pope Gregory ...

Cant I
Cant. (i) A Term Used In Architecture Where The Corner Of A Square Is Cut Off, Octagonally Or Otherwise (possibly From Lat. Cantos, Corner). Thus A Bay Window, The Sides Of Which Are Not Parallel, Or At Right Angles To The Spectator, Is Canted. (2) A Word Appearing In English ...

Cantabile
Cantabile (it.) , A Musical Direction Meaning "in A Sing Ing Style" And Employed In Instrumental Pieces To Signify That The Passage So Marked Is To Be Played In A Song-like Manner. ...

Cantabri
Cantabr.i, An Ancient Tribe Which Inhabited The North Coast Of Spain Near Santander And Bilbao And The Mountains Be Hinda District Hence Known As Cantabria. Savage And Untame Able Mountaineers, They Long Defied The Roman Arms And Made Themselves A Name For Wild Freedom. (cf. Horace, Odes, Ii. 6, 2, ...

Cantabrian Mountains
Cantabrian Mountains, A Mountain Chain Which Extends 30o M. Across Northern Spain, From The Pyrenees To The Borders Of Galicia, And Near The Coast Of The Bay Of Biscay. East Of The Pass Of Leitariegos They Are Nearly Parallel To The Coast But To The West They Trend Southward Between ...

Cantacuzino Or Cantacuzene
Cantacuzino Or Cantacuzene, The Name Of A Family Which Traces Its Origin To The Byzantine Emperors And Writers Of The Same Name (see Under John V., Cantacuzene). The Founder Of The Family, Andronik, Migrated To Rumania In 1633, And From His Two Sons Constantine And Gheorge Sprang The Two Principal ...

Cantagallo
Cantagallo, An Inland Town Of The State Of Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, About Ioo M. By Rail N.e. Of The Port Of Rio De Janeiro, With Which It Is Connected By The Cantagallo Railway. The Population Of The Municipality (1926) Was 30,463, Of Whom Less Than One-fourth Live In The ...

Cantal
Cantal, A Department Of Central France, Formed From Haute-auvergne, The Southern Portion Of The Old Province Of Auvergne. It Is Bounded North By The Department Of Puy-de Dome, East By Haute-loire, South-east By Lozere, South By Avey Ron And Lozere, And West By Correze And Lot. Area, 2,231 Sq.m. Pop. ...

Cantata
Cantata (italian For A Song Or Story Set To Music), A Vocal Composition Accompanied By Instruments And Generally Contain Ing More Than One Movement. In The I6th Century, When All Serious Music Was Vocal, The Term Had No Reason To Exist, But With The Rise Of Instrumental Music In The ...

Canteen
Canteen, A Small Shop Or Store Connected With A Military Or Naval Post, And Sometimes With An Industrial Establishment, Where Eatables, Drinkables, Tobacco, Etc., Are Sold. In The I8th And Early Part Of The 19th Centuries Sutlers Or Hawkers, Followed Armies Both In Peace And War, Selling Their Goods, Usually ...

Cantemir
Cantemir, The Name Of A Celebrated Family Of Tatar Ori Gin Which Came From The Crimea In The 17th Century And Settled In Moldavia. ...

Canterbury
Canterbury, A City And County Borough, The Metropolis Of An Archdiocese Of The Church Of England, And A Municipal, County And Parliamentary Borough Of Kent, England, 62 M. E.s.e. Of London By The S.r. Pop. (1931) 24,450. It Lies On The River Stour, Which Here Debouches From A Beautiful Narrow ...

Canticles
Canticles. This Is Another Name (cf. The Vulgate Can Ticum Canticorum) For The Old Testament Book Called In The A.v. "the Song Of Solomon," And In The R.v. "the Song Of Songs." The Latter Title, Taken From The Opening Words Of The Hebrew, Does Not Mean That The Book Is ...

Cantigny
Cantigny, A Small Village In North-east France, West Of Montdidier And 18m. South Of Amiens, Was The Scene Of The First United States Offensive In The World War. Af Ter The Great Ger Man Advance In March 1918, The I St Div. Of The American Expe Ditionary Force, Under Gen. ...

Cantilena
Cantilena (it.), A Musical Term Signifying Literally A Small Song ; Hence A Passage, Either In Vocal Or Instrumental Music, Of A Melodious And Song-like Character And, By Further Extension, The Appropriate Rendering Of Such Passages. ...

Cantilever
Cantilever, A Beam Supported At One End And Carrying A Load At The Free Extremity, Or Distributed Evenly All Along The Exposed Portion. The Upper Half Of The Thickness Of Such A Beam Is Subjected To Tensile Stress, Tending To Elongate The Fibres; The Lower Half To Compressive Stress, Tending ...

Canto
Canto, One Of The Divisions Of A Long Poem, A Term Dating From The Time When Poetry Was More Usually Sung By The Minstrel To His Own Accompaniment Than Read (from Lat. Cantus, A Song). In Music, Canto, As A Common Italian Word, Has Many Meanings, Including Music Itself, Song, ...

Canton
Canton, The Great Commercial Metropolis Of South China (23 I I' N., I 13 14' E.), Is The Regional Capital And Outlet Of The Basin Of The Sikiang Or West River Which Is The Focus Of The Life Of South China, Separated From The Yangtze Basin, The Heart Of ...

Cantonment
Cantonment. When Troops Are Distributed In Small Parties Amongst The Houses Of A Town Or Village, They Are Said To Be In Cantonments, Which Are Also Called Quarters Or Billets. For Merly, When In The Field, Armies Lived As A Rule In Camp (q.v.) Or, When The Provision Of Canvas ...

Canton_2
Canton, A City Of Fulton County, Illinois, U.s.a., Near The Illinois River, About 15om. N. Of St. Louis. It Is Served By The Burlington And The Toledo, Peoria And Western Railways. The Population Was 10,928 In 1920, And Was 11,718 In 1930 By The Fed Eral Census. It Is The ...

Canton_3
Canton, A Town Of Norfolk County, Massachusetts, U.s.a., 14m. S. Of Boston, On The New York, New Haven And Hartford Railroad. The Population In 1930 Federal Census Was 5,816. It Has Numerous And Varied Manufactures, Including Textiles, Patent Leather, Fish-lines And Fire-alarm Systems. Canton Has Been A Man Ufacturing Town ...

Canton_4
Canton, A Village Of Northern New York, U.s.a., On The Grasse River, 17m. S.e. Of Ogdensburg; The County Seat Of St. Lawrence County. It Is On Federal Highway Ii, And Is Served By The New York Central Railway. The Population In 1930 Was 2,822 Federal Census. The Village Is In ...

Canton_5
Canton, A City Of North-eastern Ohio, U.s.a., 6om. S. By E. Of Cleveland, At An Altitude Of 1,065f T., The County Seat Of Stark County. It Is On The Lincoln Highway, And Is Served By The Baltimore And Ohio, The Pennsylvania And The Wheeling And Lake Erie Railways, And The ...

Canton_6
Canton, A Word Used For Certain Divisions Of Some European Countries. In France, The Canton, Which Is A Subdivision Of The Arrondissement, Is A Territorial, Rather Than An Administrative, Unit. The Cantons Were Created By The Law Dec. 22, 1789, But Their Administrative Character Was Taken Away By The Consular ...

Cantor
Cantor, In Music, Literally "singer"; And In Church Usage, The One (chanter, Precentor, Succentor) Whose Business It Is To Lead The Singing Or, If Not Actually To Do This Himself, To Be Responsible For Its Being Properly Done By Others. In German Usage The Term, With Kapellmeister As Its Equivalent, ...

Canusium
Canusium, An Ancient City Of Apulia (gr. Kavba-nov, Mod. Canosa), On The Right Bank Of The Aufidus (ofanto), About 12 M. From Its Mouth, And Situated Upon The Via Traiana, 85 M. E.n.e. Of Beneventum. It Was Said To Have Been Founded By Diomede, And Even At The Time Of ...

Canute Vi Cnvt
Canute Vi. (cnvt) (1163-1202), King Of Denmark, Eldest Son Of Valdemar I., Was Crowned In His Seventh Year (117o) As His Father's Co-regent, And In 1182 Succeeded To The Throne. During His Reign Denmark Consolidated And Extended Her Domin Ion Over The North Baltic Coast And Adopted A More Independent ...

Canute
Canute (crrvt), Known As "the Great" (c. 995-1035), King Of Norway, Denmark, And England, Son Of Sweyn Forkbeard, King Of Denmark, Was Born C. 995. In 1013 He Sailed, With His Father, For England And Shared In The Conquest Of Wessex. After Sweyn's Death, In Feb. 1014, And The Return ...

Canvas Back
Canvas-back, A Diving Duck Related To The Pochard (q.v.), But Larger. The Canvas-back (manila Vallisneria) Is An American Bird Much Esteemed For The Table. It Takes Its Name From The Light Colour Of The Back. The Head Is Chestnut, The Beak Long And Narrow. The Canvas-back Is Found In The ...

Canvas
Canvas, A Stout Cloth Which Probably Derives Its Name From Cannabis, The Latin Word For Hemp. This Would Appear To Indicate That Canvas Was Originally Made From Yarns Of The Hemp Fibre, And There Is Some Ground For The Assumption. This Fibre And That Of Flax Have Certainly Been Used ...

Canvass
Canvass, To Sift Through Canvas, Hence To Examine Care Fully. To Solicit Subscriptions, Interest, Votes In A Prospective Election, Etc. ...

Canyon
Canyon, An Anglicized Form Of The Spanish Word Canon, Signifying A Valley With High Cliff-like Sides, Such As Are Found In The Western Parts Of The United States And In Mexico. A Few Of The More Notable Examples In The United States Are The Grand Canyon (q.v.) Of The Colorado; ...

Canzone
Canzone, A Form Of Verse Which Has Reached Us From Italian Literature. The Word Is Derived From The Provencal Canon, A Song, But It Was In Italian First That The Form Became A Literary One, And Was Dedicated To The Highest Uses Of Poetry. The Canzone Strophe Consists Of Two ...

Caoutchouc
Caoutchouc, The Principal Constituent Of Natural Rubber (see Rubber: Botany, Cultivation And Chemistry) And There Fore Sometimes Called Pure Rubber. It Occurs As A Vegetable Gum, Mixed With From -5 To 8 Times Its Own Weight Of Other Stances. Caoutchouc Is A White Resilient Solid; At Oio C It Is ...

Cap Haitien
Cap Haitien, A Seaport Of Haiti, West Indies. Pop. About 20,000. It Is Situated On The North Coast 9om. North Of Port Au Prince, In 19 46' N. And 72 14' W. Its Original Indian Name Was Guarico, And It Has Been Known, At Various Times, As Cabo Santo, Cap ...

Capacitance
Capacitance Is The Term Applied To The Effective Capacity Of A Circuit In Which An Alternating Electric Current Is Flowing. (see ...

Capacitor
Capacitor, In A Radio Set, Is An Instrument For Storing Electrical Energy In Electrostatic Form (see Electricity). It Or Dinarily Consists Of Two Conducting Surfaces, Approximately Paral Lel Separated By An Insulator Or Dielectric Material. It Is Also Called A Condenser (q.v.) . ...

Capacity
Capacity, The Ability To Contain A Definite Quantity. Cu Bical Capacity Is Measured In Units Of Volume. Electrical Capacity Is Denoted By The Charge Q (see Electricity) Which A System Can Hold On The Application Of A Given Voltage V, And Is Given By The Q V. Condenser; Broadcasting : ...

Cape Breton
Cape Breton, The North-east Portion Of Nova Scotia, Canada, Separated From The Mainland By A Narrow Strait, Known As The Gut Of Canso; Length (north To South) Isom., Greatest Breadth About 87m., And Area 3,120 Sq.m. It Juts Out So Far Into The Atlantic That It Has Been Called "the ...

Cape Coast
Cape Coast, A Port On The Gold Coast, British West Africa, In 5 5' N., I 13' W., About 8om. W. Of Accra. The Pop Ulation (193 I) Totalled 17,685, Of Whom The Europeans Numbered About 1 Oo. The Town Is Built On A Low Bank Of Gneiss And Mica ...

Cape Cod Canal
Cape Cod Canal Joins Cape Cod Bay, Mass., With The Waters Of Buzzards Bay, An Inlet Of Long Island Sound, And Trav Erses The Narrow Isthmus Of Cape Cod. It Is 8 M. Long With A Dredged Approach Channel 5 M. Long. The Width Varies Between I Oo To 30o ...

Cape Colony
Cape Colony, Or, Officially, The "province Of The Cape Of Good Hope," Consists Of The Southernmost Part Of Africa, And Is One Of The Four Provinces Which Constitute The Union Of South Africa. Its Area Is 276.966 Sq.m., I.e., 59% Of The Total Area Of The Union. It Is Bounded ...

Cape Girardeau
Cape Girardeau, A City Of Cape Girardeau County, Missouri, U.s.a., On The Bluffs Of The Mississippi River, 131m. S.s.e. Of St. Louis. It Is On Federal Highway 61, And Is Served By The Frisco Railway, River Steamboats And Barges And A Ferry To Thebes, Illinois. In 1900 The Population Was ...

Cape May
Cape May, A City Of Cape May County, New Jersey, U.s.a., A Popular Summer Resort On The Atlantic Coast, 2m. E.n.e. Of The Southern Tip Of The State. It Is Served By The Pennsylvania And The Reading Railways. The Permanent Population In 193o Was 2,637. The Principal Part Of The ...

Cape Of Good Hope
Cape Of Good Hope, The Full Name Of The Southern Most Province Of The Union Of South Africa, Formerly Cape Col Ony, Now Cape Province ; Also The Cape Of The Same Name, Form Ing The Peninsula Between Table Bay And False Bay, Which Even Tually Gave Its Name To ...

Cape Province
Cape Province, Formerly Cape Colony, The Most South Ern Part Of Africa. As A British Colony Its Official Title Was The Colony Of The Cape Of Good Hope, But It Was Known As Cape Colony. In 1910 It Became A Province Of The Union Of South Africa (see Cape Colony, ...

Cape Town
Cape Town, The Oldest Town Of South Africa, 33 56' S., 18 25' E. Cape Town Was Built On A Strip Of Low Ground On The South-western Shores Of Table Bay. To The South, Immediately Behind The Town, Rises Table Mountain In A Precipitous Wall, 2 M. Long, And Over ...

Cape Verde Islands
Cape Verde Islands (illias Do Cabo Verde), An Archi Pelago Belonging To Portugal; Off The West African Coast, Between 17 13' And 14 47' N. And 40' And 22' W. Pop. (1930) 153,700; Area, 1,475 Sq.m. The Archipelago Consists Of Fourteen Islands In All, Including Santo Antao (commonly Miswritten St. ...

Capel Curig
Capel Curig (kap'el Kii'rig Or Ku'rech), A Small Tourist Centre In Carnarvonshire, North Wales. Population Of Parish 359. It Lies 6m. W. Of Bettws-y-coed, Near The Con Fluence Of The Gwryd And The Llugwy, In Some Of The Wildest Mountain Scenery Of North Wales, And Forms A Convenient Centre For ...

Capel
Capel (of Hadham), Arthur Capel, Baron (fl. 1640--1649), English Royalist, Son Of Sir Henry Capel Of Rayne Hall, Essex, Was Elected A Member Of The Short And Long Parlia Ments In 1640 For Hertfordshire. He At First Supported The Op Position, But Went Over To The King's Party And Was ...

Capella
Capella, The Fifth Or Sixth Brightest Star In The Sky, And The Brightest Star In The Constellation Auriga (q.v.) Hence Its Alterna Tive Name A Aurigae. It Was Found To Be A Spectroscopic Binary By Newall And Campbell (see Star), And The Separation Of Its Two Components (q.v.) Was First ...

Capena
Capena, An Ancient City Of Southern Etruria, Frequently Mentioned With Veii And Falerii. According To Cato It Was A Colony Of The Former, And In The Wars Between Veii And Rome It Appears As Dependent Upon Veii, After The Fall Of Which Town, However, It Became Subject To Rome. Out ...

Capercaillie Capercailzie Or Capercally
Capercaillie (capercailzie Or Capercally), A Bird's Name Derived From The Gaelic. The Bird (tetrao Urogallus) Be Came Extinct In The British Isles About 175o, But Was Re-intro Duced In Scotland At The Beginning Of The 19th Century And Is Now Tolerably Abundant. This Species Is. Widely, Though Intermittently, Distributed On ...

Capernaum
Capernaum, On The Northern Shore Of The Sea Of Galilee, Jesus' Second Home, A Garrison Town (matt. Viii. 5), A Centre Of Administration (john Iv. 46), And A Customs Station (matt. Ix. 9). Out Of It Jesus Called Peter, Andrew And Matthew (or Levi). It Was The Witness Of Many ...

Capers
Capers, The Unexpanded Flower-buds Of Capparis Spinosa, (family Capparidaceae) Prepared With Vinegar For Use As A Pickle. The Caper Plant Is A Trailing Shrub, Belonging To The Mediterranean Region, Resembling In Habit The Common Bramble, And Having Handsome Flowers Of A Pinkish White, With Four Petals, And Numer Ous Long ...

Capet
Capet, The Name Of A Family To Which, For Nearly Nine Centuries, The Kings Of France, And Many Of The Rulers Of The Most Powerful Fiefs In That Country, Belonged. The First Of The Family To Whom The Name Was Applied Was Hugh, Who Was Elected King Of The Franks ...

Capillary Tube
Capillary Tube, A Tube Of Small Diameter In Which A Liquid Will Ascend On Account Of The Action Of Surface Tension (q.v.) Being Greater Than That Of Gravity. Capillaries, In Physi Ology, Are The Channels Connecting Arteries With Veins, And Are So Called On Account Of Their Minute Diameters (see ...

Capillary Waves
Capillary Waves, Small Waves (see `nave), In A Liquid, In Which, Owing To Their Short Wave-length, The Force Due To Surface Tension (q.v.) Has More Effect In Controlling Their Velocity Than Has That Due To Gravity. ...

Capital Levy
Capital Levy. During The First Year Of The World War It Was Thought In Great Britain That A Loan Policy Should Take The First Burden Of Its Cost, But As Soon As It Became Obvious That The War Would Be A Long One, It Was Equally Clear That The Amount ...

Capital Punishment
Capital Punishment Is The Penalty Of Death, Pro Nounced By A Competent Tribunal. Its History Shows A Shifting Of The Stress From Sacrilege And Offences Against Property To Murder Pure And Simple. Treason, Which Has Changed From The Sacrilege Of Attacking The Divinity Of Kingship To The Modern Crime Of ...

Capital
Capital, In Architecture, The Top Number Of A Column, Pier Or Pilaster, Usually Larger On The Upper Surface Than The Diameter Of The Shaft Supporting It, Thus Not Only Furnishing A Better Bear Ing For The Superstructure, But Also Forming A Decorative Accent To Cap The Vertical Line Of The ...

Capitalism
Capitalism. "capital" May Be Most Briefly Described As Wealth Used In Producing More Wealth; And "capitalism" As The System Directing That Process. This Latter Term Came Into General Use During The Second Half Of The 19th Century As A Word Chiefly Signifying The World-wide Modern System Of Organizing Production And ...

Capital_2
Capital. In Economics, Capital May Be Defined As Produced Wealth Used Productively For Gain. It Is Thus Distinguished From Land And Other Natural Resources, Which Are Not "produced," And From Consumers' Goods, Which Are Not Used Productively For Gain. The Economist's Conception Of Capital Is Unlike The Conceptions Which Govern ...

Capitulary
Capitulary, A Series Of Legislative Or Administrative Acts Emanating From The Merovingian And Carolingian Kings, So Called As Being Divided Into Sections Or Chapters (capitula). At The Pres Ent Day We Do Not Possess A Single Capitulary In Its Original Form; But Very Frequently Copies Of These Isolated Capitularies Were ...

Capitulations
Capitulations, Treaties Granted By A State And Con Ferring The Privilege Of Extra-territorial Jurisdiction Within Its Boundaries On The Subjects Of Another State. In The 9th Century The Caliph Harun-al-rashid Granted Guarantees And Commercial Facili Ties To The Franks. Similar Concessions Were Made To Certain Italian City States. Thus, In ...

Capodistria
Capodistria, A Town And Seaport Of Istria, Italy, In The Province Of Pola, 15m. S.w. Of Trieste By Rail But Also Reached By Steamer. Pop. (1921) 8,192 (town), 12,654 (commune). It Is Situated On A Small Island, Which Occupies The End Of A Large Bay In The Gulf Of Trieste, ...

Caponier
Caponier (from The Fr. Caponniere, Properly A Capon Cote Or House), In Fortification, A Work Constructed In The Ditch Of A Fort So That Fire From It Can Sweep The Bottom Of The Ditch And Prevent An Enemy From Establishing Himself Therein. The Term Is Used In A Military Sense ...

Cappadocia
Cappadocia, In Ancient Geography, An Extensive Inland District Of Asia Minor. In The Time Of Herodotus The Cappado Cians Occupied The Whole Region From Mount Taurus To The Euxine. That Author Tells Us That The Name Of The Cappadocians Was Applied To Them By The Persians, While They Were Termed ...

Capraia
Capraia (anc. Capraria, From Lat. Capra, Wild-goat), An Island Of Italy, Off The North-west Coast (the Highest Point 1,466 Ft. Above Sea-level), Belonging To The Province Of Genoa, 42 M. S.s.e. Of Leghorn By Sea. Pop. (1921), 548. It Produces Wine, And Is A Centre Of The Anchovy Fishery. It ...

Caprera
Caprera, An Island Off The North-east Coast Of Sardinia, About 4m. In Length. It Is Connected By A Bridge With La Maddalena. Its Chief Interest Lies In Its Connection With Garibaldi, Who First Established Himself There In 1856, And Died There On June 2, 1882. His Tomb Is Visited On ...

Capri
Capri (anc. Capreae), An Island In The Province Of Naples (from Which Town It Is 17 M. S.), On The South Side Of The Bay Of Naples, Of Which It Commands A Fine View. Pop. (1931) Of The Commune Of Capri. 8,041 ; Of Anacapri, 2,436. It Is 4 M. ...

Capriccio Or Caprice
Capriccio Or Caprice, A Musical Term For A Lively Com Position Of A More Or Less Fanciful Nature, Not Following A Set Musical Form, Although The First Known, Written For The Harp Sichord, Partook Of The Nature Of A Fugue. The Word Is Also Used For Pieces Of A Showy ...

Capricornus
Capricornus ("the Goat"), In Astronomy, The Tenth Sign Of The Zodiac, Represented By The Symbol Nc5 Intended To De Note The Crooked Horns Of This Animal. The Word Is Derived From Lat. Caper, A Goat, And Cornu, A Horn. It Was Represented By The Ancients As A Creature Having The ...

Caprifoliaceae
Caprifoliaceae, A Family Of Shrubs And Trees, Charac Terized By Having The Petals Of The Flower United. The Plants Are Sympetalous Dicotyledons; Common Representatives Are Sambucus (elder), Viburnum (guelder-rose And Wayfaring Tree), Lonicera (see Honeysuckle) ; Adoxa (moschatel), A Small Herb With A Creeping Stem And Small Yellowish-green Flowers, Is ...

Capsicum
Capsicum, A Genus Of Plants, The Fruits Of Which Are Used As Peppers. As Used In Medicine, The Ripe Fruit Of Capsicum Mimum (or Frutescans), Containing The Active Principle Capsaicin (capsacutin), Has Remarkable Physiological Properties. Applied To The Skin Or Mucous Membrane, It Causes Redness And Later Vesica Tion. Internally ...

Capstan
Capstan. An Appliance Used On Board Ship And On Dock Walls, For Heaving-in Or Veering Cables And Hawsers, Whether Of Chain, Steel Or Hemp. It Differs From A Windlass, Which Is Used For The Same Purposes, In Having The Axis On Which The Cable Or Rope Is Wound Vertical Instead ...

Capsule
Capsule, A Term In Botany For A Dry Seed Vessel, As In The Poppy, Iris, Foxglove, Etc., With One Or More Cavities. When Ripe The Capsule Opens And Scatters The Seed (see Fruit). The Word Is Used Also For A Small Gelatinous Case Enclosing A Dose Of Medi Cine, And ...

Captain Of Industry
Captain Of Industry. A Term Sometimes Used As An Alternative For Entrepreneur; One Who By Bringing Together Land, Capital And Labour, And Causing Them To Function, Is So Im Portant An Agent In Modern Production. (see Entrepreneur.) ...

Captain
Captain, In Its General Application Refers To The Leader, Master, Chief Or Person Of Similar Status In Any Walk Of Life, As Illustrated In Deut. I. 15"so I Took The Chief Of Your Tribes, Wise Men And Known, And Made Them Heads Over You, Captains Over Thousands, And Captains Over ...

Captal
Captal, A Mediaeval Feudal Title In Gascony, Best Known In Connection With The Famous Soldier Jean De Grailly Captal Of Buch (died 1376), Immortalized By Froissart As The Confidant Of The Black Prince And The Champion Of The English Cause Against France. ...

Caption
Caption, A Term Still Used In Law, Especially Scots, For Arrest Or Apprehension. The Term Also Has An Old Legal Use, To Sig Nify The Part Of An Indictment Or Document, Etc., Which Shows Where, When, And By What Authority It Is Taken, Found Or Executed ; So Its Opening ...

Captive
Captive: See War, Laws Of: Prisoners Of War. Capture At Sea: See Blockade; Contraband; Neu Trality; Prize; Visit And Search. ...

Capua
Capua, The Chief Ancient City Of Campania, And One Of The Most Important Towns Of Ancient Italy, Situated 16 M. N. Of Neapolis, On The North-east Edge Of The Campanian Plain. Its Site In A Position Not Naturally Defensible, Together With The Regularity Of Its Plan, Indicates That It Is ...

Capua_2
Capua, A Town And Archiepiscopal See Of Campania, Italy, In The Province Of Caserta, 7m. W. By Rail From The Town Of Caserta. Pop. 9,579 (town), 14,363 (commune). It Was Erected In 856 By Bishop Landulf On The Site Of Casilinum (q.v.) After The Destruction Of The Ancient Capua By ...

Capuchin Monkey
Capuchin Monkey, A Tropical American Monkey, Cebus Capucinus; The Name Is Often Extended To Embrace All Spe Cies Of The Same Genus, Whose Range Extends From Nicaragua To Paraguay. These Monkeys Are The Typical Representatives Of The Family Cebidae, And Belong To A Sub-family In Which The Tail Is Generally ...

Capuchins
Capuchins, An Order Of Friars In The Roman Catholic Church, The Chief And Only Permanent Offshoot From The Francis Cans. It Arose About The Year 1520, When Matteo Di Bassi, An "observant" Franciscan, Became Possessed Of The Idea That The Habit Worn By The Franciscans Was Not The One That ...

Capulets And Montagues
Capulets And Montagues, The English Forms Of The Italian Names Capelletti And Montecchi, Made Familiar Through Shakespeare's Tragedy Of Romeo And Juliet. They Represent Two Legendary Noble Families Of Verona In The 14th Century Whose Enmity Rendered Tragical The Loves Of Their Two Children. The Legend, Which May Have Been ...

Capulin Mountain National Monument
Capulin Mountain National Monument, A Tract Of About 68o Ac. In The Extreme North-west Corner Of New Mexico, U.s.a., Set Aside As A Government Reservation In 1916. It Is A Region Of Extinct Volcanoes, The Principal One Being Capulin Mountain Which Is About 1 M. In Diameter At Its Base ...

Capybara Or Carpincho
Capybara Or Carpincho (hydrochaerus Capybara), The Largest Living Rodent Characterized By Its Partially-webbed Toes, Of Which There Are Four In Front And Three Behind, Hoof-like Nails, Sparse Hair, Short Ears, Cleft Upper Lip And The Absence Of A Tail (see Rodentia). Capybaras Are Aquatic Rodents, Frequenting The Banks Of Lakes ...

Car
Car, A Term Originally Applied To A Small Two-wheeled Vehicle For Transport (see Carriage), But Also To Almost Anything In The Nature Of A Carriage, Chariot, Etc., And To The Carrying Part Of A Balloon. With Some Specific Qualification (tram-car, Street-car, Railway-car, Sleeping-car, Motor-car, Etc.) It Is Combined To Serve ...

Carabiniers
Carabiniers, Originally 16th Century Light Cavalry Armed With "large Pistols Called Carabins Having Barrels Aft. Long." English Carabiniers Are Mentioned As Early As 1s97 At The Battle Of Turnhout Under Sir Francis Vere. The Early Practice In England And France Was To Attach A Proportion Of Men Armed With Carabins ...

Carabobo
Carabobo, Next To The Smallest Of The 20 States Of Vene Zuela, Bounded North By The Caribbean Sea, East By The State Of Aragua, South By Cojedes And West By Lara. Its Area Is 2,985 Sq.m., And Its Population (1926 Official Estimate) Was 147,204. The Greater Part Of Its Surface ...

Caracal
Caracal, The Capital Of The Department Of Romanatzi, Rumania, Between The Jiu And Oet Rivers. Pop. C. 16,00o. The Town Is Named After The Roman Emperor Caracalla And The Ruins Of His Tower, Built A.d. 217 Are Still To Be Seen. The Only Trade Is In Grain. ...