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Acis
Acis, In Greek Mythology, The Son Of Pan (faunus) And The Nymph Symaethis, A Beautiful Shepherd Of Sicily, The Lover Of The Nereid Galatea. His Rival The Cyclops Polyphemus Surprised Them Together, And Crushed Him To Pieces With A Rock. His Blood, Gushing Forth From Beneath, Was Metamorphosed By Galatea ...

Acknowledgment
Acknowledgment, An Admission That Something Has Been Given Or Done, A Term Used In Law In Various Connections. The Acknowledgment Of A Debt, If In Writing Signed By The Debtor Or His Agent, Is Sufficient To Take It Out Of The Statutes Of Limita Tions. The Signature To A Will ...

Acmite Or Aegirite
Acmite Or Aegirite, A Mineral Of The Pyroxene (q.v.) Group, Essentially A Sodium And Ferric Metasilicate, Nafe(sio3)2• In Its Crystallographic Characters It Is Close To Ordinary Pyroxene (augite And Diopside), Being Monoclinic And Having Nearly The Same Angle Between The Prismatic Cleavages. There Are, However, Important Differences In The Optical ...

Acne
Acne, A Skin Eruption Produced By Inflammation Of The Sebaceous Glands And Hair Follicles, The Essential Point In The Disease Being The Plugging Of The Mouths Of The Sebaceous Follicles By A "comedo," Familiarly Known As "blackhead." It Is Generally Acknowledged That The Cause Of This Disease Is A Specific ...

Acoelomata
Acoelomata, A Word Sometimes Used In Zoology In Contradistinction To Coelomata (q.v.) To Denote Those Animals In Which No Second Body Cavity (coelom, Q.v.) Is Present. The Group Includes The Coelenterata And Platyhelminthes (qq.v.). ...

Acoemeti
Acoemeti, An Order Of Eastern Monks Who Celebrated The Divine Service Without Intermission Day Or Night (gr. 6.kolµnros, Sleepless). This Was Done By Dividing The Communities Into Choirs, Which Relieved Each Other By Turn In The Church. Their First Mon Astery Was Established On The Euphrates In The Beginning Of ...

Acolyte
Acolyte, The Highest Of The Four Minor Orders In The Ro Man Church (gr. Ax6xoveos, Follower). The Office Is Unknown In The Eastern Church, Except Among The Armenians Who Borrowed It From The West. Before The Council Of Nicaea (325) It Was Only Found At Rome And Carthage. In 251, ...

Acoma
Acoma, A Tribe And Town Of The Pueblo Indians In New Mexico, Forming An Isolated Western Settlement Of The Keres Stock. The Town Is Strikingly Situated On A Mesa Rising 35oft. Sheer Above The Surrounding Plain, In Which Lie The Pueblo Farm Lands At A Distance Of Some Miles. It ...

Acominatus
Acominatus (pcominatos), Michael (c. 1140 1220), Byzantine Writer And Ecclesiastic, Was Born At Chonae (the Ancient Colossae). He Studied At Constantinople, And About 1175 Was Appointed Archbishop Of Athens. After The Capture Of Con Stantinople By The Franks And The Establishment Of The Latin Empire (1204), He Retired To The ...

Aconcagua
Aconcagua, A Small Northern Province Of Central Chile, Bounded On The North By Coquimbo, East By Argentina, South By Santiago And West By The Pacific. Its Area, Including Valparaiso, Annexed In 1928, Is 18,598sq. Kilometers. Pop. (1920) Including Territory Added In 1928, Was 437,312; The 1930 Census Found 463,544. The ...

Aconcagua_2
Aconcagua, An Extinct Volcano In The Southern Andes With A Height Of About 23,000f T., Usually Regarded As The Loftiest Mountain In America. It Is Situated On The Boundary Line Between Chile And Argentina In 39' S. And 70° 1' W. On Its Southern Slope Is The Source Of The ...

Aconite
Aconite (aconitum), A Genus Of Plants Belonging To The Ranunculaceae, The Buttercup Family, Commonly Known As Acon Ite, Monkshood Or Wolf Sbane, And Embracing About 6o Species, Chiefly Natives Of The Mountainous Parts Of The Northern Hemi Sphere. They Are Distinguished By Having One Of The Five Blue Or Yellow ...

Acontius
Acontius, In Greek Legend, A Beautiful Youth Of The Island Of Ceos. During The Festival Of Artemis, At Delos, Acontius Saw And Loved Cydippe, A Well-born Athenian Maiden. He Wrote On An Apple The Words, "i Swear To Wed Acontius" And Threw It At Her Feet. She Picked It Up, ...

Acorn Shells
Acorn Shells, A Name Often Applied To The Sessile Forms Of Barnacles (q.v.) Common On Rocks, Piers, Etc., Round The Coasts. (see Also Cirripedia.) ...

Acorn
Acorn, The Fruit Of The Oak-tree (see Oak) ; A Word Also Used, By Analogy With The Shape, In Nautical Language, For A Piece Of Wood Keeping The Vane On The Mast-head. ...

Acorus Calamus
Acorus Calamus, Sweet-sedge Or Sweet-flag, A Plant Of The Family Araceae, Which Shares With The Cuckoo Pint (arum) The Representation In Britain Of That Family Of Monocotyledons. The Name Is Derived From Acorns, Gr. Ilkopos, The Classical Name For The Plant. It Was The Calamus Arornaticus Of The Mediaeval Druggists ...

Acosmism
Acosmism. This Term Was Coined By Fichte And Hegel On The Model Of The Term Atheism. According To The Ordinary View, Reality Consists Of God And A World (cosmos) Of Finite Objects Usually Conceived As Having Been Created By Him And Made To Conform To Certain Laws. Now Atheism Is ...

Acqui
Acqui, City And Episcopal See, Province Of Alessandria, Italy; From The Town Of That Name It Is Aim. S.s.w. By Rail. Pop. (1931) 13,449 (town), 18,975 (commune). Its Warm Sulphur Springs Were Already Famous As Aquae Statiellae In Roman Times. Part Of The Ancient Bath Establishment Has Been Found ; ...

Acraniata
Acraniata, An Obsolete Term For A Sub-phylum Of The Chordata, Including Only Amphioxus (q.v.) And Its Allies. ...

Acre Or Aquiry
Acre Or Aquiry, A River Of Brazil And Principal Tributary Of The Pur6s, Rising On The Bolivian Frontier And Flowing Easterly And Northerly To A Junction With The Puras At 8° 45' S. The Name Is Also Applied To A District Situated On The Same River And On The Former ...

Acre
Acre. A Harbour Town Or City Of Palestine (egypt. Ak (a), Assyr. Akku, Heb. Akko, Gr. Ake [josephus, 'arke], Lat. Ac(c)e; On Crusading Coins Ac(c)on, Arab. Akka). From The 3rd Century B.c. It Was Known As Ptolemais, Perpetuating, Perhaps The Name Of Ptolemy Ii. (philadelphus). The Name St. Jean D'acre ...

Acre_2
Acre, A Land Measure Used By English-speaking Races. De Rived From The O.e. Acer And Cognate With The Lat. Alter, Gr. P6s, Sans. Ajras, It Has Retained Its Original Meaning "open Coun Try," In Such Phrases As "god's Acre," A Churchyard, Or "broad Acres," Etc. As A Measure Of Land, ...

Acridine
Acridine Is A Solid, Crystallizing In Needles Of Melting Point 1o° C, Found In Coal-tar Anthracene. It Is Characterized By Its Irritating Action On The Skin, And By The Blue Fluorescence Shown By Solutions Of Its Salts. It Is Extracted From The Crude Anthracene By Dilute Sulphuric Acid ; The ...

Acriflavine
Acriflavine, A Coal Tar Derivative, In The Form Of A Reddish-brown Crystalline Powder, Possessed Of Antiseptic Proper Ties. Weak Solutions Are Pale Lemon-yellow And Should Be Freshly Made. A Modification, Known As Neutral Acriflavine, Has Now Almost Supplanted The Older Drug, As It Is Less Irritant And Can Be Used ...

Acromegaly
Acromegaly, The Name Given To A Disease Characterized By A True Hypertrophy (an Overgrowth Involving Both Bony And Soft Parts) Of The Terminal Parts Of The Body, Especially Of The Face And Extremities. It Occurs In Both Sexes, Usually Between The Ages Of 25 And 4o. Its Causation Is Associated ...

Acron
Acron, A Greek Physician Of The 5th Century B.c., Born At Agrigentum In Sicily, Was Contemporary With Empedocles. The Method Of Lighting Large Fires And Purifying The Air With Perfumes, To Put A Stop To The Plague In Athens (430 B.c.), Is Said To Have Originated With Him. ...

Acropolis
Acropolis, Literally The Upper Part Of A Town (gr. Twos Top, Rats City). For Purposes Of Defence Early Settlers Chose Elevated Ground, Frequently A Hill With Precipitous Sides, And These Early Citadels Became In Many Parts Of The World The Nuclei Of Large Cities Which Grew Up On The Surrounding ...

Acrostic
Acrostic, A Short Verse Composition, So Constructed That The Initial Letters Of The Lines, Taken Consecutively, Form Words (gr. Likpos, At The End, And Line Or Verse). The Fancy For Writing Acrostics Is Of Great Antiquity, Having Been Common Among The Greeks Of The Alexandrine Period, As Well As With ...

Acroterium Or Akroterion
Acroterium Or Akroterion, In Architecture, A Statue Or Ornament Of Any Kind Placed On The Apex Or At The Lower Angles Of A Pediment. The Word Is Sometimes Restricted To The Pedestal Supporting Such An Ornament. ...

Act Of Parliament
Act Of Parliament. An Act Of Parliament May Be Regarded As A Declaration Of The Legislature, Enforcing Certain Rules Of Conduct, Or Defining Rights And Conferring Them Upon Or With Holding Them From Certain Persons Or Classes Of Persons. Acts Of Parliament Fall Into Two Classes—"public" And "private." The Former ...

Act Of State
Act Of State, A Term In Law Which May Be Generically Described As An Act Of The Crown, Or Of Some Officer Whose Act Is Ratified By The Crown, Which The Courts Will Treat As Conclusive And Binding On Them In Any Litigation Before Them. Such A Defence Or Plea ...

Act On Petition
Act On Petition, The Term For A Part Of The Procedure In The British Probate, Divorce And Admiralty Division, Now Of Infrequent Occurrence. It Was More Freely Used In The Old Admiralty And Divorce Courts Before The Judicature Acts. (see Divorce.) ...

Act
Act, A Word Varying In Significance According To The Sense In Which It Is Employed. It Is Often Synonymous With "statute" (see Act Of Parliament). It May Also Refer To The Result Of The Vote Or Deliberation Of Any Legislature, The Decision Of A Court Of Justice Or Magistrate, In ...

Acta Diurna
Acta Diurna, Called Also Acta Populi, Acta Publica And Simply Acta Or Diurna, In Imperial Rome A Sort Of Daily Gazette, Containing An Official Narrative Of Noteworthy Events At Rome. Its Contents Were Partly Official (court News, Decrees, Etc.), Partly Pri Vate (notices Of Births, Etc.). Thus To Some Extent ...

Acta Sanctorum
Acta Sanctorum, A Collection Of The Lives Of The Saints, Arranged Day By Day According To The Calendar, And Compiled By The Bollandists, Belgian Jesuits. The Work, First Conceived At The Commencement Of The 17th Century, Has Been Carried On Ever Since, Save During The Period Of The Suppression Of ...

Acta Senatus Or Commentarii
Acta Senatus Or Commentarii Senatus, Minutes Of The Discussions Of The Roman Senate. Before The First Consulship Of Julius Caesar (5g B.c.), Minutes Of The Proceedings Of The Senate Were Occasionally Published, Unofficially; Caesar, However, Ordered Them To Be Issued Authoritatively. The Keeping Of Them Was Continued By Augustus, But ...

Actaeon
Actaeon, Son Of Aris Taeus And Autonoe, Boeotian Hero And Hunter. According To Ovid (metam., Iii. 131), Having Accidentally Seen Artemis On Mt. Cithaeron While She Was Bathing, He Was Changed By Her Into A Stag, And Pursued And Killed By His 5o Hounds. His Statue Was Often Set Up ...

Acting
Acting. Greek Drama Is Usually Given First Consideration In Connection With The Origin Of Dramatic Art, But The Basic Rea Sons For Imitation, Mimicry And What Is Now Called "acting" Are Found In The Study Of The Lower Races Of Man. Make-believe, Or The Desire To Imitate, Is, Perhaps, Most ...

Actinic Rays
Actinic Rays, Ultra-violet Rays Which Produce Chemical Changes. The Term Is Sometimes Popularly Applied To The Ultra Violet Rays Which Are Invisible, But Can Be Detected By Their Action On A Photographic Plate And By Rendering Certain Substances Fluorescent (see Fluorescence And Phosphorescence). They Are, To A Certain Extent, Absorbed ...

Actinium
Actinium Is One Of The Radioactive Elements Giving Rise To A Series Of Other Elements. Its Symbol Is Ac, Atomic Number 89, And Probable Atomic Weight 23o. (see Radioactivity.) ...

Actinometer
Actinometer, An Instrument For Measuring The Heating And Chemical Effects Of Light. It Is Derived From The Greek, &kris Ray, Orpov Measure. The Name Was First Given By Sir John Her Schel To An Apparatus For Measuring The Heating Effect Of Solar Rays (edin. Fours. Science, 1825) ; Herschel's Instrument ...

Actinomycosis Streptotrichosis
Actinomycosis (streptotrichosis), A Chronic Infec Tive Disease Occurring In Both Cattle And Man. In Both These Groups It Presents The Same Clinical Course, Being Characterized By Chronic Inflammation With The Formation Of Granulomatous Tumours, Which Tend To Undergo Suppuration, Fibrosis Or Calcifica Tion. It Used To Be Believed That This ...

Actinozoa
Actinozoa, An Old Technical Name For Sea Anemones, Now Usually Known As Actiniaria. (see Anthozoa.) ...

Actium
Actium (mod. Punta), The Ancient Name Of A Promontory In The North Of Acarnania (greece) At The Mouth Of The Sinus Ambracius (gulf Of Arta) Opposite Nicopolis, Built By Augustus On The North Side Of The Strait. On The Promontory Was An Ancient Temple Of Apollo Actius, Which Was Enlarged ...

Activism
Activism Denotes Any View That Lays Stress On Action And Its Requirements. In Psychology It Means The View That Stresses The Importance Of Conation Rather Than Cognition (see Attention, Conation, 'psychology). In Philosophy It Denotes The View Which Makes Utility The Test Of Truth (see Pragmatism), Or Allows Moral Claims ...

Acton
Acton, Municipal Borough, Middlesex, England, Suburban To London, 9m. W. Of St. Paul's Cathedral. Population (1861) 3,151; 37,744; (1931) 70,523. The Best Derivation Offered For Its Name Is From Oak-town ; In Reference To The Exten Sive Forest Which Formerly Covered The Locality. The Land Be Longed From Early Times ...

Acts Of The Apostles
Acts Of The Apostles. This Book Of The Bible Was Originally The Sequel Of The Gospel Of Luke. Its Separation Was Due To A Growing View Of The Gospels As A Unit Of Sacred Records, To Which Acts Stood As Appendix. Historically It Is Of Unique Interest And Value. The ...

Actuality Theory
Actuality Theory Is The View That The Real Is Not A Thing Or A State At Rest, But An Activity Or A Process. In Philosophy The Theory Is As Old As Heraclitus Who Conceived Ultimate Reality As An Incessant Becoming, Not As Static Being. In Modern Philosophy Spinozism May Be ...

Actuary
Actuary. The Name Of Actuarius, Sc. Scriba, In Ancient Rome, Was Given To The Clerks Who Recorded The Acta Publica Of The Senate, And Also To The Officers Who Kept The Military Accounts And Enforced The Due Fulfilment Of Contracts For Military Supplies. In Its English Form The Word Has ...

Acupuncture
Acupuncture, A Form Of Surgical Operation, Performed By Pricking The Part Affected With A Needle. It Has Long Been Used By The Chinese In Cases Of Headaches, Lethargies, Convulsions, Colics, Etc. ...

Ada
Ada, A City Of Oklahoma, 85m. S.e. Of Oklahoma City; Served By The Santa Fe, The Frisco And The Oklahoma City-ada-atoka Railways. The Population, Nearly All Native Whites, Increased From 4,349 In 1910 To 11,261 In 193o. Ada Is The County Seat Of Pontotoc County, Which Produces Natural Gas And ...

Adab
Adab (modern Bismaya), An Ancient Town In Mesopotamia, In 32° N., 45° 3o' E., 25m. S. Of Nippur. It Was Supplied By A Canal Which Passed Through The City And Irrigated The Country, Eventually Falling Into The Shatt Al Hai. In The Centre Of The City The Canal Divided To ...

Adabazar
Adabazar, An Important Commercial Town In The Khoja Ili Sanjak Of Asia Minor, Situated On The Old Military Road From Constantinople To The East, And Connected By A Branch Line With The Anatolian Railway. Pop. (1927), 83,523. There Are Silk And Linen Industries And An Export Of Tobacco, Walnut-wood, Cocoons ...

Adad
Adad, The Name Of The Storm-god In The Babylonian-as Syrian Pantheon, Who Is Also Known As Ramman ("the Thunderer"). It Seems That Ramman Was The Name Current In Babylonia, Whereas Adad Was More Common In Assyria. A God Hadad, A Prominent Deity In Ancient Syria, Is Identical With Adad, Whose ...

Adaev
Adaev, A Province Of The Kazakh Socialist Soviet Republic. Area 303,325 Sq.km. Pop. (1926) 136,000 (urban 3,012). The Area Includes The Ust Urt Plateau (700f T.) In The South, And The Low Plain To The North Of It Which Apparently Once Linked The Caspian And Aral Seas, And Which Is ...

Adagio
Adagio, A Term In Music To Indicate Slow Time; Also A Slow Movement In A Symphony, Sonata, Etc., Or An Independent Piece, Such As Mozart's Pianoforte, "adagio In B Minor." The Diminutive Form Adagietto Means Somewhat Less Slow Than Adagio. ...

Adalberon Or Ascelin
Adalberon Or Ascelin (d. 1030 Or 1031), French Bishop And Poet, Studied At Reims And Became Bishop Of Laon In 977. When Laon Was Taken By Charles, Duke Of Lorraine, In 988, He Was Put Into Prison, Whence He Escaped And Sought The Protection Of Hugh Capet, King Of France. ...

Adalbert Or Adelbert
Adalbert Or Adelbert (c. 1000-1072), German Archbishop, Was The Son Of Frederick, Count Of Goseck, A Member Of A Noble Saxon Family. Adalbert Stood High In The Favour Of Henry Iii., Whom He Accompanied On Many Expeditions Into Hun Gary, Italy, Slavonia And Elsewhere. It Is Said That He Might ...

Adalbert
Adalbert (c. 700), English Saint, Possibly A Grandson Of Oswald, King Of Deira, Was Sent With St. Willibrord On A Mission To The Frisians, And Is Said To Have Been The First Archdeacon Of Utrecht. In About 702 He Went To Preach In North Holland, Where He Built A Church ...

Adalbert_2
Adalbert, Originally Voytech (c. 950-997), Known As The Apostle Of The Prussians, The Son Of A Bohemian Prince, Was Born At Libice (lobnik, Lubik). He Was Educated At The Mon Astery Of Magdeburg; And In 983 Was Chosen Bishop Of Prague. The Extreme Severity Of His Rule Repelled The Bohemians, ...

Adalia
Adalia, The Ancient Attaleia (q.v.) (med. Antaliyah ; The Crusaders' Satalia), The Largest Seaport On The South Coast Of Asia Minor, Though In Point Of Trade It Is Now Second To Mersina. The Unsuitability Of The Harbour For Modern Steamers, The Bad Anchorage Outside And The Extension Of Railways From ...

Adam Afzelius
Afzelius, Adam Swedish Botanist, Was Born At Larf, Vestergotland. He Founded The Linnaean Institute At Uppsala In 1802, And In 1812 Became Professor Of Materia Medica At The University. In Addition To Various Botanical Writings, He Published The Autobiography Of Linnaeus In 1823. His Brother Johan Afzelius (17 J3-183 7) ...

Adam Anderson
Anderson, Adam (1692-1765), Scottish Economist, Was Born In 1692, And Died In London On Jan. Io 1765. He Was A Clerk For 4o Years In The South Sea House, Where He Published A Work Entitled Historical And Chronological Deduction Of The Origin Of Commerce From The Earliest Accounts To The ...

Adam Of Bremen
Adam Of Bremen (died C. 1076), Historian And Geographer, Was, According To One Tradition, Born At Meissen (saxony) Before 1045. In 1069 He Appears As A Canon Of Bremen And Master Of The Cathedral School. On The Death Of Adalbert, Archbishop Of Bremen, In 1072, He Began The Historia Hamma ...

Adam Scotus
Adam Scotus (c. 1180), Theological Writer, Sometimes Called Adam Anglicus Or Anglo-scotus, Was Born In The South Of Scotland In The First Half Of The 12th Century. About 115o He Was A Premonstratensian Canon At St. Andrews, And About 20 Years Later Was Perhaps Abbot And Bishop Of Candida Casa ...

Adam
Adam, The Hebrew Word For "man"; When Used Without The Article Implying The Human Species (e.g., Gen. I. 26 And The Familiar Phrase "son" Or "sons Of Man," I.e., A Human Being Or Human Beings), With The Article A Human Individual, Correspond Ing Generally To The Latin Homo And The ...

Adamant
Adamant, The Modern Diamond (q.v.), But Also A Name Given To Any Very Hard Substance (gr. &sagas, Untameable). The Word Is Used By Homer As A Personal Epithet, And By Hesiod For The Hard Metal In Armour. By Confusion With The Lat. Adamare, To Have An Attraction For, It Came ...

Adamawa
Adamawa, A Country Of West Africa, Which Lies Roughly Between 6° And I I ° N., And I I° And 15° E., About Midway Between The Bight Of Biafra And Lake Chad. The Region Is Watered By The Benue, A Tributary Of The Niger. Another Stream, The Yedseram, Flows North-east ...

Adamites Or Adamians
Adamites Or Adamians, A Sect Of Heretics That Flour Ished In North Africa In The 2nd And 3rd Centuries. Basing Itself Probably On A Union Of Certain Gnostic And Ascetic Doctrines, This Sect Pretended That Its Members Were Re-established In Adam's State Of Original Innocency. ...

Adamnan Or Adomnan
Adamnan Or Adomnan (c. 624-704), Irish Saint And Historian, Was Born At Raphoe, Donegal, Ireland. In 679 He Was Elected Abbot Of Hy Or Iona, Being Ninth In Succession From The Founder, St. Columba. In 686, While On A Visit To King Aldfrith Of Northumbria He Was Led To Adopt ...

Adams Apple
Adam's Apple, The Movable Projection (more Prominent In Males) In The Front Of The Throat Formed By The Thyroid Carti Lage Of The Larynx. The "adam's Apple" Is One Of The Particular Points Of Attack In The Japanese System Of Self-defence Known As Ju-jutsu (q.v.). ...

Adams Bridge Or Ramas
Adam's Bridge Or Rama's Bridge, A Chain Of Sandbanks Between The Island Of Manaar, Near The North-west Coast Of Ceylon And The Island Of Rameswaram, Off The Indian Coast, And Lying Between The Gulf Of Manaar On The South-west And Palk Strait On The North-east. More Than 3om. Long, It ...

Adams Peak
Adam's Peak, A Mountain In Ceylon, About 45m. E. Of Colombo, In 6° 55' N., 8o° 3o' E. It Rises Steeply To A Height Of 7,352ft. And Commands A Magnificent Prospect. Its Conical Sum Mit Terminates In An Oblong Platform, 74ft. By 24, On Which There Is A Hollow, Resembling ...

Adams
Adams, A Town Of Berkshire County, Mass., U.s.a., Near The North-western Corner Of The State; Including Part Of The Valley Of The Hoosac River, And Extending From The Hoosac Mountains On The East To Mt. Williams (3,o4oft.) And Mt. Greylock (3,505ft.) On The West. It Has An Area Of 23sq.m., ...

Adam_2
Adam, The Name Of A Family Of French Sculptors. Lambert Sigismund (1700-1759) Executed Many Pieces For The French Royal Residences And For Frederick The Great Of Prussia. Nicolas Sebastien, His Brother (1705-1778), Was Responsible For The Tomb Of Catherine Opalinska At Nancy. Another Brother, Francois Gaspard Balthasar, Executed Many Of ...

Adam_3
Adam (or Adan) De Le Hale (c. 1238-1288), French Troubadour, Was Born At Arras. His Patronymic Is Generally Mod Ernized To La Halle, And He Was Commonly Known To His Contempo Raries As Adam D'arras Or Adam Le Bossu, Sometimes Simply As Le Bossu D'arras. Adam Studied Grammar, Theology And ...

Adaptation
Adaptation, A Process Of Fitting, Or Modifying, A Thing To Other Uses, And So Altering Its Form Or Original Purpose. In Literature There May Be, E.g., An Adaptation Of A Novel For A Drama, Or In Music An Arrangement Of A Piece For Two Hands Into One For Four, Etc. ...

Ada_2
Ada, A Village Of Hardin County, 0., U.s.a., On The Pennsyl Vania Railroad, 15m. E. Of Lima, With A Population Of 2,499 In 193o. It Lies On The Watershed Between The Ohio River And The Great Lakes, In A Rich Agricultural District. Natural Gas Is Avail Able. The Village Has ...

Adda
Adda (anc. Addua), A River Of North Italy. It Rises In Small Lakes Of The Fraele Glen, And Unites With Several Smaller Streams Near Bormio, In The Rhaetian Alps. Thence It Flows South-west And West Through The Fertile Valtellina (q.v.) Passing Tirano; The Poschiavino Joins It At Tirano And The ...

Addax
Addax, A Genus Of Antelopes, With One Species (a. Nasoma Culatus) From North Africa And Arabia. It Is 3 Ft. High, Yellowish White In Colour, With A Brown Mane And Fringe On The Throat. Both Sexes Carry Horns, Which Are Ringed And Form An Open Spiral. The Addax Is A ...

Adder
Adder, A Name For The Common Viper (vipera Berm) Of Europe And Asia. The Puff-adder (bitis Arietans), Widespread In Africa, And The Death-adder (acanthophis Antarcticus), Of Aus Tralia, Are Both Very Poisonous. In North America The Harmless Hognose Snake (heterodon Contortrix), Which Hisses Loudly, Is Called Puffing Adder Or Spreading ...

Addis Ababa
Addis Ababa (the New Flower), Capital Of Abyssinia Since 1896, About 8,000ft. Above Sea Level On The Southern Slopes Of The Entoto Mts. In 9° I' N., 38° E. It Is Linked By A Single Railway Line (486m.) With Jibuti, The Principal Town Of French Somaliland On The Gulf Of ...

Addisons Disease
Addison's Disease, An Affection Manifesting Itself In An Exaggeration Of The Normal Pigment Of The Skin, Asthenia, Irri Tability Of The Gastro-intestinal Tract, And Weakness And Irregularity Of The Heart's Action : These Symptoms Being Due To Loss Of Function Of The Suprarenal Glands. It Is Important To Note, However, ...

Addressing Machine
Addressing Machine: See Office Appliances. Ade, George (1866– ), American Author, Was Born At Kentland, Ind., On Feb. 9, 1866. After Graduating From Purdue University In 1887, He Took Up Newspaper Work In Lafayette, Ind., And Chicago (1887-1900). Although He Belongs To The School Of American Vernacular Humorists, He Is ...

Adelaer Or Adeler
Adelaer Or Adeler, The Surname Given To Kurt Sivert Sen (1622-75), Norwegian-danish Sailor. Born At Brevig, In Norway, He Entered The Dutch Navy And Then The Venetian Serv Ice, Where He Was Known As Curzio Suffrido Adelborst (i.e., Dutch For "naval Cadet"). He Commanded The Venetian Squadron At The Battle ...

Adelaide Adelheid
Adelaide (adelheid) (931-999), Queen Of Italy And Empress, Was The Daughter Of Rudolph H. Of Burgundy, And Married, In 947, Lothair, Who Succeeded His Father Hugh As King Of Italy. Lothair Died In 950 And Adelaide Was Imprisoned At Como By His Successor, Berengar H., Marquis Of Ivrea, Who Wished ...

Adelaide
Adelaide, Capital Of South Australia, In The County To Which It Gives Its Name, Is Situated Near The Middle Of The East Ern Side Of St. Vincent Gulf Where The Coast Line Curves Farthest Inland (eastwards). The Genius Of Sturt, And Then Of Light, The First Surveyor-general, Selected (1836) A ...

Adelard Or Aethelard
Adelard Or Aethelard Of Bath (12th Century), English Scholastic Philosopher. He Studied In France And Travelled In Spain, Italy, North Africa And Asia Minor, Where He Became Acquainted With Arabian Scholarship. He Returned To England In The Time Of Henry I., And Received An Annual Grant From The Revenues Of ...

Adelie Land
Adelie Land, Antarctic Land Situated On The Polar Circle In Longitude 140° E., Discovered By The Frenchman Dumont D'urville In 1840. The Steep Coasts, Rising To Heights Of From 3,25o To 4,000ft. Are Almost Unapproachable. Although Covered With Snow And Ice And Completely Uninhabited, It Has Possibilities Of Utilization For ...

Ademption
Ademption, A Taking Away; In Law, A Revocation Of A Grant Or Bequest (see Legacy). ...

Aden
Aden, Seaport And Territory In Arabia, Situated In 12° 45' N., And 45° 4' E., On A Peninsula Near The Entrance To The Red Sea, Loom. East Of The Strait Of Bab-el-mandeb. The Peninsula Of Aden Has Barren And Desolate Volcanic Rocks, Rising To 1776ft. And Extending 5m. From East ...

Adenez Or Adans Adenes
Adenes, Adenez Or Adans, Surnamed Le Roi, French Trouvere, Was Born In Brabant About 124o. He Owed His Education To The Kindness Of Henry Iii., Duke Of Brabant, And He Remained In Favour At Court For Some Time After The Death (1261) Of His Patron. In 1269 He Entered The ...

Adenine
Adenine Occurs In The Pancreas And Widely Elsewhere In The Animal Kingdom, As Well As In Beer Yeast And Tea Leaves. It Has Been Prepared Synthetically And Also By Decomposition Of Nucleic Acids And Other Complex Animal Substances. It Is A Colour Less Solid, Crystallizing With Three Molecules Of Water, ...

Adept
Adept (if Used As A Substantive Pronounced Adept, If As An Adjective Adept), Completely And Fully Acquainted With One's Sub Ject, An Expert. (lat. Adeptus, One Who Has Attained.) The Word Implies More Than Acquired Proficiency, A Natural Inborn Aptitude. In Olden Times An Adept Was One Who Was Versed ...

Aderno
Aderno, Town Of The Province Of Catania, Sicily, 22r11. By Rail N.w. Of The Town Of That Name. Pop. (1931) 23,595. An Ciently Adranon (the Original Siculan Settlement Was Perhaps Some 5m. Away), It Took Its Name From Adranos, An Indigenous Deity, In Roman Times Identified With Vulcan, To Whom ...

Ades
Ades Are Non-alcoholic Beverages Made From The Juice Of Lemons, Oranges Or Limes, Powdered Sugar Or Syrup And Plain, Mineral Or Carbonated Water. Usually A Maraschino Cherry And Cracked Ice Are Added, And A Straw Through Which To Sip The Drink. They Are Sold In The United States Chiefly At ...

Adevism
Adevism, A Term Introduced By Max Miller To Imply The Denial Of Gods (skt. Deva), On The Analogy Of Atheism, The De Nial Of God (see Gifford Lectures, 1892, C. Ix.). ...

Adhemar De Chabannes
Adhemar De Chabannes (c. 988–c. 1030), Me Diaeval Historian, Was Born At Chabannes, France. He Was A Monk Of The Monastery Of St. Cybard, Angouleme, And Died, Probably At Jerusalem, Where He Was On Pilgrimage. Adhemar's Principal Work, Chronicon Aquitanicum Et Francicum Or Historia Francor Um, Is In Three Books ...

Adiabatic Change
Adiabatic Change, A Change In The Physical State Of A Body, Whether This Change Be One Of Volume, Strain, Electric Charge, Etc., Which Involves No Passage Of Heat To Or From The Body. (see Thermodynamics. ...

Adiabatic Lapse
Adiabatic Lapse Of Temperature Of The Atmosphere, The Limiting Rate Of Decrease Of Temperature With Increasing Height Consistent With Convective (or Neutral, Or Adiabatic) Equilibrium. In Temperate Regions The State Of The Atmosphere Is In Convective Equilibrium And The Adiabatic Lapse Corresponds To A Fall Of I° C For Each ...