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Anet
Anet, Town Of North France, In The Department Of Eure-et Loir, Situated Between The Rivers Eure And Vegre, Iom. N.e. Of Dreux By Rail. Pop. (1931) 1,179. It Possesses The Remains Of A Magnificent Castle, Built In The Middle Of The 16th Century By Henry Ii. For Diana Of Poitiers. ...

Aneurin
Aneurin, A British (welsh) Bard, Author Of The Gododin, Flourished At The Beginning Of The 7th Century. He Is Said To Have Been The Son Of Caw-ab-geraint, A Chief Of The Gododin, Who Had Their Home On The Sea-coast To The South Of The Firth Of Forth. In Some Of ...

Aneurysm Or Aneurism
Aneurysm Or Aneurism, A Cavity Or Sac Which Com Municates With The Interior Of An Artery And Contains Blood. The Walls Of The Cavity Are Formed Partly By The Dilated Artery And Partly By The Tissues Around That Vessel. The Dilatation Of The Artery Is Due To Local Degeneration Or ...

Anfractuosity
Anfractuosity, Twisting And Turning, Circuitousness. Usually Employed In The Plural To Denote Winding Channels Such As Occur In The Depths Of The Sea, Mountains, Or The Fissures (sulci) Separating The Convolutions Of The Brain. ...

Angaria
Angaria, The Term Used To Denote The Postal System Adopted By The Roman Imperial Government From The Ancient Persians, Among Whom, According To Xenophon, It Was Established By Cyrus The Great. The Word Is Derived From The Greek Form Of A Word, Originally Babylonian, Meaning "mounted Courier." Couriers On Horseback ...

Angel Fish
Angel-fish, The Popular Name For Several Widely Differing Species Of Fishes, Including (a) Squatina Squatina, Also Called The Monk Fish, An Elasmobranch Allied To The Sharks And Found In Tropical And Sub-tropical Seas, Including The Mediterranean. It Takes Its Name From The Large Wing-like Pectoral Fins And Reaches A Length ...

Angel
Angel, A Term Used In The Vocabulary Of Monotheistic Re Ligions To Describe A Personal Being Intermediate In Nature, Status, And Powers, Between God And Man. It May Be Conjectured That In Most Instances A Belief In Such Beings Is An Attempt To Retain The Subordinate Gods And Spirits Of ...

Angelica
Angelica, A Genus Of Plants Of The Family Umbelliferae, Represented In Britain By One Species, A. Sylvestris, A Tall Peren Nial Herb With Large Bipinnate Leaves And Large Compound Umbels Of White Or Purple Flowers. The Name Angelica Is Popularly Given To Angelica (archangelica) Officinalis, The Tender Shoots Of Which ...

Angelus Silesius
Angelus Silesius German Religious Poet, Was Born In 1624 At Breslau, And Died There On July 9, 1677. His Family Name Was Johann Scheffler, But He Is Generally Known By The Pseudonym Angelus Silesius, Under Which He Published His Poems And Which Marks The Country Of His Birth. Brought Up ...

Angelus
Angelus, A Roman Catholic Devotion In Memory Of The Annunciation. It Consists Of Three Texts (beginning "angelus Domini Nuntiavit Mariae," Hence The Name), With Three Ave Marias And A Concluding Versicle, Response And Prayer. It Is Re Cited Three Times Daily, About 6 A.m., Noon And 6 P.m., When The ...

Angel_2
Angel, A Gold Coin, First Used In France (angelot, Ange) In 1340, And Introduced Into England By Edward Iv. In 1465 As A New Issue Of The "noble," And So At First Called The "angel-noble." It Varied In Value Between That Period And The Time Of Charles I. (when It ...

Anger
Anger Is An Emotion Consisting Of Antagonistic, Displeased, Attacking Feelings Toward An Offending Person Or Thing. Some Psychologists Have Attempted To Distinguish Anger From Rage By Supposing That True Anger Occurs Only When The Sex Or Love Emo Tion Is Opposed, As In The Sex Combats Of Rival Males Among ...

Angermunde
Angermunde, A Town Of Germany In Brandenburg, On Lake Munde About 43m. From Berlin. Pop. (1933) , 9,022. In 142o The Elector Frederick I. Of Brandenburg Gained A Victory Here Over The Pomeranians. The Town Is An Important Railway Junction. ...

Angerona
Angerona, A Roman Goddess. According To Ancient Authorities, She Relieved Men From Pain And Sorrow, Or Delivered The Romans And Their Flocks From Angina (quinsy) ; Or She Was The Protecting Goddess Of Rome And The Keeper Of The Sacred Name Of The City, Which Might Not Be Pronounced Lest ...

Angers
Angers, Capital Of The Department Of Maine-et-loire, West France, 191 M. S.w. Of Paris By The Western Railway To Nantes. Pop. (1931) 77,327. It Occupies Rising Ground On Both Banks Of The Maine, Crossed By Three Bridges. The Old Town, On The Left Bank, Is Dominated By The Cathedral And ...

Angilbert
Angilbert (d. 814), Frankish Latin Poet, And Minister Of Charlemagne, Was Of Noble Frankish Parentage, And Educated At The Palace School Under Alcuin. He Is Said To Have Been The Father Of Two Children By Charlemagne's Daughter, Bertha, One Of Them Named Nithard. From 790 He Was Abbot Of St. ...

Angina Pectoris
Angina Pectoris, A Term Applied To A Violent Paroxysm Of Pain, Arising Almost Invariably From Disease Of The Coronary Arteries With Consequent Degeneration Of The Heart Muscle (see Heart, Diseases Of). An Attack Of Angina Pectoris Usually Con Sists In A Sudden Agonizing Pain, Felt At First Over The Heart, ...

Angiosperms
Angiosperms. The Botanical Term Receptacle, And Arreppa, Seed) Was Coined In The Form Angiosper Mae By Paul Hermann In 169o, As The Name Of That One Of His Primary Divisions Of The Plant Kingdom Which Included Flowering Plants Possessing Seeds Enclosed In Capsules, In Contradistinction To His Gymnospermae, Or Flowering ...

Angkor
Angkor, An Assemblage Of Ruins In Cambodia, The Relic Of The Ancient Khmer Civilization. They Are Situated In Forests To The North Of The Great Lake (tonle-sap), The Most Conspicuous Of The Remains Being The Town Of Angkor-thom And The Temple Of Angkor-vac, Both Of Which Lie On The Right ...

Angle
Angle, In Plane Geometry, A Figure Formed By Two Lines Which Meet. The Point Of Meeting Is Called The Vertex Of The Angle. The Original Idea Has Been Extended To Include The Figure Formed By A Plane And A Line Which Meets It, By Two Intersecting Planes (a Dihedral Angle), ...

Angler
Angler (lophius Piscatorius), Also Called The Fishing Frog, Belongs To The Order Pediculati. It Is A Bottom-living Fish, Abundant Round The Coasts Of Europe And Western North America ; It Does Not Extend Beyond 60° N. Lat. The Enormous Mouth, With Long, Backwardly-directed, Depressible Teeth, And The Large Flattened Head ...

Anglesey Or Anglesea
Anglesey Or Anglesea, An Insular Northern County Of Wales, Area About 276sq.m., Is Cut Off From The Adjoining Main Land Of Carnarvonshire By The Shallow Menai Strait. The Island Differs Strikingly From Most Other Parts Of Wales In The Lowness Of The Land—the Highest Points Being 7 2 Of T., ...

Anglesite
Anglesite, A Mineral Consisting Of Lead Sulphate, Pbso,, Crystallizing In The Orthorhombic System, And Isomorphous With Barytes And Celestite. It Was First Recognized As A Mineral Species, In 1783, By Dr. Withering, Who Discovered It In The Parys Copper Mine In Anglesey ; The Name Anglesite, From This Locality, Was ...

Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion, The Name Used To Denote That Branch Of The Christian Church Consisting Of The Various Ecclesias Tical Bodies, Throughout The World, In Communion With The Church Of England. (see England, Church Of.) ...

Anglicanism
Anglicanism, A General Term For The Ecclesiastical Sys Tem, Organization, And Doctrine Of The Church Of England And The Churches Throughout The World In Communion With It. (see England, Church Of.) ...

Anglii Or Angles Angli
Angli, Anglii Or Angles, A Teutonic People Mentioned By Tacitus In His Germania (cap. 4o) At The End Of The 1st Century, Without Precisely Indicating Their Geographical Position. With Six Other Tribes, Including The Varini (the Warni Of Later Times), They Worshipped A Goddess Named Nerthus, Whose Sanctuary Was Situ ...

Angling Fresh Water Fishing
Angling - Fresh-water Fishing Fly-fishing.—fly-fishing Is The Most Modern Of Them, But It Is The Most Highly Esteemed, Principally Because It Is The Method Par Excellence Of Taking Members Of The Most Valuable Sporting Family Of Fish, The Salmonidae. It May Roughly Be Considered Under Three Heads: The Use Of ...

Angling Methods Andpractice
Angling - Methods And Practice Angling Falls Into Two Main Divisions, Fishing In Fresh Water And Fishing In The Sea. The Two Branches Of The Sport Have Much In Common, And Sea-angling Is Really Little More Than An Adaptation Of Fresh-water Methods To Salt-water Conditions. Therefore It Will Not Be ...

Angling The Fish
Angling - The Fish It Is Practically Impossible To Classify The Fish An Angler Catches According To The Methods Which He Employs, As Most Fish Can Be Taken By At Least Two Of These Methods, While Many Of Those Most Highly Esteemed Can Be Caught By All Three. Sporting Fresh ...

Angling
Angling, The Art Or Practice Of The Sport Of Catching Fish By Means Of A Baited Hook Or "angle" (from The Indo-european Root Ank–, Meaning "bend"). It Is Among The Most Ancient Of Human Activities, And May Be Said To Date From The Time When Man Was In The Infancy ...

Anglo Israelite Theory
Anglo-israelite Theory, The Contention That The English-speaking Peoples Are The Descendants Of The "ten Tribes" Of Israel, Deported By Sargon Of Assyria On The Fall Of Samaria In 721 B.c. The Theory, Still Held By Over 2,000,000 Peo Ple, Materially Assisted The Resettlement Of Jews In England In The 17th ...

Anglo Japanese Alliance
Anglo-japanese Alliance. On Jan. 30 1902, Owing To The Threat Of Russian Aggression In The Far East, Great Britain And Japan Concluded An Alliance Of A Defensive Char Acter Which Provided For Mutual Assistance In The Safeguarding Of British Interests In China And Japanese Interests In China And Korea. The ...

Anglo Norman Literature
Anglo-norman Literature. The French Lan Guage (q.v.) Came Over To England With William The Conqueror. During The Whole Of The 12th Century It Shared With Latin The Distinction Of Being The Literary Language Of England, And It Was In Use At The Court Until The 14th Century. It Was Not ...

Anglo Saxons
Anglo-saxons. The Term "anglo-saxon" Is Commonly Applied To That Period Of English History, Language And Literature Which Preceded The Norman Conquest. It Goes Back To The Time Of King Alfred, Who Seems To Have Frequently Used The Title Rex Anglorum Saxonum . Or Rex Angul-saxonum. The Origin Of This Title ...

Angola
Angola, The General Name Of Portuguese Possessions In West Africa South Of The Equator. The Name (a Portuguese Cor Ruption Of The Bantu Ngola) Is Sometimes Confined To The Io5m. Of Coast, With Its Hinterland, Between The Rivers Dande And Kwanza; But Is Officially Applied To A Whole Province Situated ...

Angola_2
Angola, A Conventional Trade Term Used To Describe A Particular Type Of "union" Or "mixture" Yarn Produced From Short Staple Or "shoddy" Wool And Raw Staple Cotton, Blended Together By A "scribbling" Process To Ensure Their Thorough Admix Ture, Before Spinning. The Wool And Cotton Are Blended In Vary Ing ...

Angostura Bark
Angostura Bark, The Bark Of Cusparia F Ebri F Uga, Is Used In The Form Of An Extract As An Astringent To Increase The Appetite, To Stimulate Gastric Secretion And As A Tonic. Its Effect, Best Obtained By Administration A Few Minutes Before Meals, Is Due To The Bitter Alkaloid ...

Angouleme
Angouleme, South-west France, Capital Of The Depart Ment Of Charente, 83m. N.n.e. Of Bordeaux On The Railway From Poitiers. Pop. The Old Town Is On A Small Steep Sided Peninsula Washed On The North By The Charente, And On The South And West By A Small Tributary, The Anguienne. The ...

Angoumois
Angoumois, An Old Province Of France, Nearly Corre Sponding To-day To The Department Of Charente. Its Capital Was Angouleme. ...

Angra Or Angra Do
Angra Or Angra Do Heroismo ("bay Of Hero Ism," A Name Given It In 1829, To Commemorate Its Successful Defence Against The Miguelist Party), The Former Capital Of The Azores (portuguese), And Chief Town Of An Administrative Dis Trict, Comprising The Islands Of Terceira (on Which It Lies), St. George ...

Angstrom Unit
Angstrom Unit, The Unit Employed For Measuring Wave Lengths Of Light, Being Equal To One Ten-millionth Of A Millimetre, I.e., I X Metre. The Usual Abbreviation For This Unit Is A.u. ...

Anguilla Or
Anguilla Or Snake Island, British West Indies, Part Of The Presidency Of St. Kitts-nevis, In The Colony Of The Leeward Islands, 18° 12' N. And 63° 5' W., About 6om. N.w. Of St. Kitts, 16m. Long, Area 35sq.m., Population Estimated 4,398, Mostly Negroes. Charcoal-burners Have Almost Completely Denuded The Island, ...

Angulate
Angulate, Shaped With Corners Or Angles; Used In Botany And Zoology For The Shape Of Stems, Leaves And Wings. ...

Anhalt
Anhalt, A Land Of Germany, Formerly A Duchy And Later A Free State. The Former Duchy Was Created In 1863 By Amal Gamation Of Two Duchies, Anhalt-dessau-cothen And Anhalt Bernburg, And Comprised All The Anhalt Territories Sundered In 1603. It Now Consists Of Two Larger Portions—eastern And Western Anhalt, Separated ...

Anhwei
Anhwei (nganhui), A Province Of China Lying Astride The Yangtze-kiang In Its Final S.w.–n.e. Course Before It Enters On Its Delta. It Has An Area Of 54,826sq.m. And A Population Of About 20,200,000 (193o). Anhwei Falls Into Two Divisions Distinct From Almost Every Point Of View. Northern Anhwei, Beyond The ...

Anhydrite
Anhydrite, A Mineral, Differing Chemically From The More Commonly Occurring Gypsum In Containing No Water Of Crystalli Zation, Being Anhydrous Calcium Sulphate, It Crystallizes In The Orthorhombic System, And Has Three Directions Of Perfect Cleavage Parallel To The Three Planes Of Symmetry. Distinctly Developed Crystals Are Somewhat Rare, The Mineral ...

Ani
Ani, A Ruined Ancient City In The Armenian S.s.r. (anc. Abni Cum). Altitude 4,39oft. In A.d. 961 It Was The Capital Of The Bag Ratid Kings Of Armenia; Later It Was Known As The City Of R,00r Churches ; Frequently Besieged By Turks, Georgians And Mon Gols, It Was Finally ...

Anicetus
Anicetus, Pope (c. 157-168). It Was During His Pontificate That St. Polycarp Visited The Roman Church To Confer With Him About The Paschal Controversy. ...

Animal Behaviour
Animal Behaviour. To Give A Plain Tale Of This Or That Instance Of Animal Behaviour Is Not Easy. The Language In Which It Is Described Nearly Always Introduces Words Which Imply More Than Can Be Seen. And What Most People Want Is Not Only A Plain Tale Of That Which ...

Animal Breeding
Animal Breeding. The Aim Of The Breeder Is To Obtain And Maintain Generation By Generation Improvement In The Sum Of The Desirable Qualities Exhibited By His Stock And To Elimi Nate Qualities Regarded As Undesirable. His Task Is That Of Produc Ing True-breeding Types Which, Under The Circumstances In Which ...

Animal Extracts
Animal Extracts. Many Substances Used In Thera Peutics Are Derived From The Animal Kingdom ; The Majority Are Obtained From The Animals Themselves, Only A Few, Such As Honey And Wax, Being Obtained Through The Activity Of A Member Of The Animal Kingdom. The Most Common Animal Extracts Are Adrena ...

Animal Heat
Animal Heat. Under This Heading Is Discussed The Physiology Of The Temperature Of The Animal Body. The Higher Animals Have Within Their Bodies Certain Sources Of Heat, And Also Some Mechanism By Means Of Which Both The Production And Loss Of Heat Can Be Regulated. This Is Conclusively Shown By ...

Animal Psychology
Animal Psychology, The Study Of The Behaviour Of The Lower Animals With A View To Ascertaining Their Mentality. Animal Psychology Is A Part Of Comparative Psychology (q.v.), And Its Special Interest Consists In The Light Which It Throws On The Development Of The Human Mind, And Especially On Human In ...

Animal Sociology
Animal Sociology. The Distinctive Note Of An Animal Society Is That A Number Of Individuals Of The Same Species Act Together As A Unity, Combining Their Efforts In Defence Or In Attack Or In Work. Thus A Troop Of Monkeys, A Beaver Village, A Herd Of Horses Or Cattle, A ...

Animal Worship
Animal Worship, An Ill-defined Term, Covering Facts Ranging From The Worship Of The Real Divine Animal, Commonly Conceived As A "god-body," At One End Of The Scale, To Respect For The Bones Of A Slain Animal Or Even The Use Of A Respectful Name For The Living Animal At The ...

Animal
Animal, A Term First Used To Denote A Living Thing, But Now Used To Designate One Branch Of Living Things As Opposed To The Other Branch Known As Plants. Until The Discovery Of Protoplasm, And The Series Of Investigations By Which It Was Established That The Cell Was A Fundamental ...

Animatism
Animatism Is The Tendency Of The Primitive Mind To Re Gard And Treat The Inanimate, In So Far As It Is Held To Be Sacred, As If It Were Animated—that Is, Alive And Endowed With Feelings And A Will Of Its Own. In Imputing Animatism To The Savage, Due Allowance ...

Animato
Animato (ital.), A Musical Term Signifying That The Piece Or Passage So Marked Is To Be Played With Animation And Spirit. "con Anima" And "con Spirito" Have The Same Meaning. ...

Anime
Anime, An Oleo-resin (said To Be So Called Because In Its Nat Ural State It Is Infested With Insects) Which Is Exuded From The Locust Tree, Hymenaea Courbaril (family Leguminosae), And Other Species Of Hymenaea Growing In Tropical South America. It Is Of A Pale Brown Colour, Transparent, Brittle, And ...

Animism
Animism Is Derived From Anima, "breath," Which In Latin Came To Have The Secondary Sense Of "soul," Very Much As Did The Equivalent Word Spiritus, Whence Our "spirit." Hence Animism Might Stand For Any Doctrine Having To Do With Soul Or Spirit And, Later, With Souls Or Spirits. The Word ...

Anio
Anio, A River Of Italy About 75 Miles Long; The Principal Trib Utary Of The Tiber In Its Lower Course. It Rises In The Limestone Mountains East Of Subiaco, And Thence To Tivoli The Road Follows Its Narrow Valley. The Water Of The River Supplied Rome In Ancient Times (see ...

Anion
Anion, The Constituent Of An Electrolyte (see Electrolysis) Deposited At The Anode (q.v.) By An Electric Current. When A Molecule (q.v.) Splits Into Electrically Charged Parts These Are Called Ions (see Ionization). In The Case Of A Liquid The Negative Ion Is Termed The Anion And Is Non-metallic In Character. ...

Anise
Anise (pimpinella Anisum), An Umbelliferous Plant Found In Egypt And The Levant, And Cultivated On The Continent Of Europe For Medicinal Purposes. The Officinal Part Of The Plant Is The Fruit, Which Consists Of Two United Carpels, Called A Cremocarp. It Is Known By The Name Of Aniseed, And Has ...

Anjar
Anjar, A Fortified Town Of India And The Capital Of A District Of The Same Name In The Native State Of Cutch In The Presidency Of Bombay. The Country Is Arid And Is Supplied With Water By Well Irrigation. The Town Is Situated Nearly Iom. From The Gulf Of Cutch. ...

Anjou
Anjou, The Old Name Of A French Territory Representing The Ancient Gallic State Of The Andes, Re-organized As The Roman Civitas Of The Andecavi, And Preserved As An Administrative Dis Trict Under The Franks With The Name First Of Pagus, Then Of Comi Tatus, Or Countship Of Anjou. This Countship, ...

Ankerite
Ankerite, A Member Of The Mineral Group Of Rhombohe Dral Carbonates. In Composition It Is Closely Related To Dolomite, But Differs From This In Having Magnesia Replaced By Varying Amounts Of Ferrous And Manganous Oxides, The General Formula Being Ca(mg,fe,mn) The Colour Is White, Grey, Or Red Dish. Ankerite Occurs ...

Anklam Or Anclam
Anklam Or Anclam, Germany, 5m. Above The Mouth Of The River Peene In The Kleines Haff, And S3m. N.w. Of Stettin. Pop. Anklam Or Tanglim, Originally A Slav Fortress, Joined The Hanseatic League In 1244. It Was Swed Ish From 1648-76. It Suffered In The Thirty Years' And Seven Years' ...

Ankober
Ankober, A Town In, And At One Time Capital Of, The King Dom Of Shoa, Abyssinia, 90 M. N.e. Of Adis Ababa, In 9° 34' N., 54' E., On A Mountain About 85oo Ft. Above The Sea. Ankober Was Made (c. 189o) By Menelek Ii. The Place Of Detention Of ...

Ankole
Ankole, A Term Used To Designate A Plateau Of The Uganda Protectorate, British East Africa, And The People (hima And Iro) Occupying It. There Has Been Little Except Linguistic Assimilation Here Between The Hamitic Intruders And The Indigenous Popula Tion. The Former, Known As Hima, And Distinguished By Fine Fea ...

Ankylosis Or Anchylosis
Ankylosis Or Anchylosis, A Stiffness Of A Joint, The Result Of Injury Or Disease. The Rigidity May Be Complete Or Partial And May Be Due To Inflammation Of The Tendinous Or Muscular Structures Outside The Joint Or Of The Tissues Of The Joint Itself. When The Structures Outside The Joint ...

Ankylostomiasis Or Anchylostomiasis
Ankylostomiasis Or Anchylostomiasis Is Also Called Helminthiasis, "miner's Anaemia," And In Germany Wurmkrankheit. (see Hookworm.) ...

Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor, A City Of Michigan, U.s.a., On The Huron River, 38m. W. Of Detroit ; The County-seat Of Washtenaw County. It Is Served By The Michigan Central And The Ann Arbor Railways, And By Electric Trolley And Motor-coach Lines. The Population Was 19,516 In 1920, And Was 26,944 In ...

Anna Amalia
Anna .amalia (1739-1807), Duchess Of Saxe-weimar, Daughter Of Charles I., Duke Of Brunswick-wolfenbiittel, Was Born At Wolfenbiittel On Oct. And Married Ernest, Duke Of Saxe-weimar, 1756. Her Husband Died In 1758, Leaving Her Regent For Their Infant Son, Charles Augustus. She Was A Patroness Of Art And Literature And Attracted ...

Anna Comnena
Anna Comnena, Byzantine Historian, Daughter Of The Emperor Alexius I. Comnenus, Was Born On Dec. I 1083. She Was Carefully Trained In The Study Of Poetry, Science And Greek Philosophy. She United With The Empress Irene In A Vain At Tempt To Prevail Upon Her Father During His Last Illness ...

Anna Leopoldovna
Anna Leopoldovna, Sometimes Called Anna Car Lovna (1718-1746), Duchess Of Brunswick, Regent Of Russia For A Few Months During The Minority Of Her Son Ivan, Was The Daughter Of Catherine, Sister Of The Empress Anne, And Charles Leopold, Duke Of Mecklenburg-schwerin. In 1739 She Married Prince Antony Ulrich Of Brunswick-wolfenbiittel, ...

Anna Perenna
Anna Perenna, An Old Roman Deity Of The Circle Or "ring" Of The Year, As The Name (per Annum) Clearly Indicates. Her Festival, Characterized By Revelry And Licentiousness, Fell On The Full Moon Of The First Month (march 15), And Was Held At The Grove Of The Goddess At The ...

Anna
Anna (hindustani Ana), An Indian Penny, The I6th Part Of A Rupee. The Term Belongs To The Mohammedan Monetary System (see Rupee). The One-anna Coin Is Of Nickel And Scalloped; And There Are Two-anna (nickel) And Four-anna (cupro-nickel) Pieces. The Term Anna Is Frequently Used To Express A Fraction. Thus ...

Annaberg
Annaberg, A Town In The Land Of Saxony, Germany, In The Erzgebirge, 1,894ft. Above The Sea, 18m. S. By E. Of Chem Nitz. Pop. (1933) 19,828. The Annenkirche (1499-15 2 5) Pos Sesses Fine Sculptures And Early I6th Century Works Of Art. Anna Berg, Together With The Suburb Of Buchholz, ...

Annabergite
Annabergite, A Mineral Consisting Of A Hydrous Nickel Arsenate, Crystallizing In The Monoclinic Sys Tem. Crystals Are Minute And Capillary And Rarely Met With, The Mineral Occurring Usually As Soft Earthy Masses And Incrusta Tions. A Fine Apple-green Colour Is Its Characteristic Feature. It Was Long Known Under The Name ...

Annalists
Annalists, Writers Of Annals (annales, Chronicles, Properly Year-books) ; A Name Commonly Given To A Group Of Roman Writ Ers To Whom Is Due The Formation Of The Conventional History Of Rome From The Earliest Times. It Is Alleged That From The Begin Ning It Was Customary To Keep A ...

Annals
Annals, A Concise Historical Record In Which Events Are Arranged Chronologically, Year By Year (annales, From Annus, A Year) . The Chief Sources Of Information About The Annals Of Ancient Rome Are Two Passages In Cicero (de Oratore, Ii. 12, 5 2 ) And In Servius (ad Aen., I. 373) ...

Annam
Annam, A Country Of South-east Asia, The Eastern Coastal Belt Of The Peninsula Of Indo-china (see Indo-china, French), Forming A French Protectorate With Frontiers Fixed By Treaty (june 6, 1884). It Is Bounded On The North By Tongking, East And South East By The China Sea, South-west By Cochin China, ...

Annan
Annan, Royal And Municipal Burgh, Dumfriesshire, Scot Land, On The Annan, Nearly 2m. From Its Mouth And 15m. From Dumfries By The L.m.s.r. Pop. (1931) 3,959. There Is A Branch Line From Kirtlebridge And A Railway Viaduct One Mile Long Crosses The Solway Firth To Port Carlisle (cumberland). The River ...

Annapolis Convention
Annapolis Convention, A Gathering Of Delegates From Several States, Of Great Importance In The Movement For A Federal Convention To Revise The Articles Of Confederation. From Early Colonial Days There Had Been Differences Of Opinion Between Citizens Of Maryland And Virginia Relative To The Jurisdiction Over The Waters Of Chesapeake ...

Annapolis Royal
Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Capital Of Annapolis County And Till 175o Of Nova Scotia; On An Arm, Of The Bay Of Fundy, At The Mouth Of The Annapolis River, 95m. W. Of Halifax; On The Main Canadian Pacific Railway. Pop. (1931) 739. It Is One Of The Oldest Settlements In ...

Annapolis
Annapolis, A City And Seaport Of Maryland, U.s.a., The Capital Of The State, The County Seat Of Anne Arundel County, A Port Of Entry Of The Maryland Customs District, And The Seat Of The United States Naval Academy; On The Severn River About 2m. From Its Entrance Into Chesapeake Bay, ...

Annates
Annates, In The Strictest Sense Of The Word, The Whole Of The First Year's Profits Of A Spiritual Benefice Which, In All Countries Of The Roman Obedience, Were Formerly Paid Into The Papal Treasury (lat. Annatae, From Annus, Year ; Also Primitiae, First-fruits). This Custom Was Only Of Gradual Growth. ...

Anne Of Brittany
Anne Of Brittany (1477–i514), Duchess Of Brittany And Queen Consort Of France, Daughter Of Francis Ii., Duke Of Brittany, And Marguerite De Foix. She Was Scarcely 12 Years Old When She Succeeded Her Father As Duchess, Sept. 9 1488. Charles Viii. Aimed At Establishing His Authority Over Her; Alain D'albret ...

Anne Of Cleves
Anne Of Cleves (1515-1557), Fourth Wife Of Henry Viii., King Of England, Daughter Of John, Duke Of Cleves, And Mary, Only Daughter Of William, Duke Of Juliers, Was Born On Sept. 22, 1515. Her Father Was The Leader Of The German Prot Estants, And The Princess, After The Death Of ...

Anne Of Denmark
Anne Of Denmark Queen Of James I. Of England And Vi. Of Scotland, Daughter Of King Frederick Ii. Of Denmark And Norway And Of Sophia, Daughter Of Ulric Iii., Duke Of Mecklenburg, Was Born On Dec. 12 15 74. On Aug. 20 1589, In Spite Of Queen Elizabeth's Opposition, She ...

Anne Of France
Anne Of France (146o-1522), Dame De Beaujeu, Was The Eldest Daughter Of Louis Xi. And Charlotte Of Savoy. Louis Xl Betrothed Her At First To Nicholas Of Anjou, And Afterwards Offered Her Hand Successively To Charles The Bold, To The Duke Of Brittany, And Even To His Own Brother, Charles ...

Anne
Anne (1693-1740), Empress Of Russia, Second Daughter Of Ivan V., Peter The Great's Imbecile Brother, And Praskovia Saltui Kova. Her Girlhood Was Passed At Ismailovo Near Moscow, With Her Mother, An Ignorant, Bigoted Tsaritsa Of The Old School, Who Neglected And Even Hated Her Daughters. Peter Acted As A Second ...

Annealing
Annealing, A Process Of Heating And Cooling Applied To Glass And Various Metals And Alloys, With The Object Of Relieving Stresses, Or Of Altering The Properties Of The Material. The Result Is Softening, Due To Rearrangement. In Its Modern Form The Process Is Effected In Closed Furnaces. Another Class Of ...

Annecy
Annecy, A Chief Town Of The Department Of Haute Savoie, France. Pop. (1931) 17,444. It Is Situated At A Height Of I,47oft., Amid Fine Scenery Under The Cret Du Maure At The North End Of The Lake Of Annecy, 25m. By Rail N.e. Of Aix-les-bains. Annecy Was In The Loth ...

Annelida Hirudinea
Annelida - Hirudinea The Hirudinea Or, Popularly, Leeches, Are Hermaphrodite Annelids Provided With A Sucker At Both Ends. There Are No Parapodia Or Chaetae, Except In Acanthobdella, A Form Which Is Assigned By Some Authorities To The Oligochaeta. There Are No Appendages Except Branchiae, Which Occur In A Few Species. ...

Annelida Myzostomaria
Annelida - Myzostomaria The Myzostomaria Are Small Aberrant Annelids Living As Ex Ternal Or Internal Parasites On Echinoderms. The Great Majority Of Their Hosts Are Crinoids ; A Few Are Among The Ophiuroids And Asteroids. Originally Attributed By Leuckart To The Trematodes, The Myzostomaria Have Been Put By Various Authors ...

Annelida Oligochaeta
Annelida - Oligochaeta Next To The Polychaeta, The Largest Division Of The Annelida, Are The Oligochaeta. More Than Four-fifths Of The Species Are Earthworms; Also Comprised Within The Group Are A Number Of Small Or Minute Worms, Some Of Fresh-water Habit, Others (belong Ing To The Family Enchytraeidae) Plentifully Present, ...

Annelida Polychaeta
Annelida - Polychaeta The Polychaeta Include The Marine Bristle-worms. A Very Few Species Have Adopted A Freshwater Habitat. They Differ From The Other Great Subdivision Of The Annelida, The Oligochaeta, In The Following Ways. In The Oligochaeta There Are No Appendages, And The Bristles Are Embedded Directly In The Body-wall ...

Annelida
Annelida. The Phylum Annelida Includes The Segmented Worms. They Differ From The Arthropoda In The Possession Of A Perivisceral Cavity Which Is A Part Of The Coelom And From The Mollusca In The Fact That The Body Is Segmented. This Segmenta Tion Has Its Origin In The Mesoblastic Somites Of ...

Annen
Annen, A Town In The Arnsberg District Of The Prussian Province Of Westphalia, 6m. S.w. Of Dortmund. Pop. (1925) 17,831. Coal-mining Is Carried On And Glass, Soap, Chemicals And Metals Manufactured. ...