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Encyclopedia Britannica Volume 3 Baltimore - Braila

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Bassarab Or Bassaraba
Bassarab Or Bassaraba, The Name Of A Dynasty In Rumania Which Ruled Walachia From The Dawn Of Its History Until 1658. The Origin Of The Name And Family Has Not Yet Been Ex Plained. It Undoubtedly Stands In Close Connection With The Name Of The Province Of Bessarabia, Which Oriental ...

Bassari
Bassari, A West African Tribe, Well-set-up, Prognathous, Patrilineal, Animistic People Of Medium Stature, Living In The Bassari District, Northern Togoland. Their Language Is Related To Losso. They Have Head Chiefs And Village Chiefs Taken From Among The Notables. The Extended Family Group Embraces Several Households Living Together. Land Is Held ...

Bassein
Bassein, A District And Town In The Irrawaddy Division Of Lower Burma. The District Has Been Reduced To 4,145sq.m., From 8,954sq.m. In 1871, Having Given Up A Large Tract To The District Of Myaungmya Formed In 1896. The Eastern Half Of The District Lies In The Irrawaddy Delta But The ...

Basses Pyrenees
Basses-pyrenees, The Extreme South-west Department Of France, Bounded On The North By Landes And Gers, East By Hautes-pyrenees, South By Spain And West By The Sea. Area Sq.miles. Pop. (1931) 422,719. The Pyrenean Crestline As Elsewhere Generally Bounds Spain But There Are Importan' Fortified Passes, Notably That Of Somport And ...

Basset Horn
Basset Horn, A Wood-wind Instrument, Which Is Not Really A Horn But A Member Of The Clarinet Family, Of Which It Is The Tenor. It Consists Of A Nearly Cylindrical Tube Of Wood (generally Cocus Or Box-wood), Having A Cylindrical Bore And Terminating In A Metal Bell Wider Than That ...

Basset Or Bassette
Basset Or Bassette, A French Game Of Cards Now Obsolete, Played By Five Persons With A Pack Of 52 Cards. It Resembles Lansquenet (q.v.), In That It Is Played Between A Banker And Several Punters, The Players Winning Or Losing According As Cards Turned Up Match Those Already Exposed Or ...

Basso Rilievo
Basso-rilievo, The Term Applied To Sculpture In Which The Design Projects But Slightly From The Plane Of The Background. The Relief May Not Project At All From The Original Surface Of The Material, As In The Sunken Reliefs Of The Egyptians, And May Be Nearly Flat, As In The Panathenaic ...

Bassompierre
Bassompierre, Francois De Mar Shal Of France And The Author Of Some Famous Memoires, Was Born At The Castle Of Harrouel In Lorraine On April 12 15 79. He Was Introduced At The Court Of Henry Iv. In 1598, And Became A Great Favourite With The King. He Fought In ...

Bassoon
Bassoon, A Wood-wind Instrument With Double Reed Mouth Piece, A Member Of The Oboe (q.v.) Family, Of Which It Is The Bass. The German And Italian Names Of The Instrument (fagott And Fagotto) Were Bestowed From A Fancied Resemblance To A Bundle Of Sticks, The Bassoon Being The First Instrument ...

Basswood
Basswood (tilia Americana Or T. Glabra), A North Amer Ican Tree Of The Lime Genus, Called Also Linden, Linn And Whitewood, Valuable For Timber And Planted For Shade And Ornament. It Grows Native From New Brunswick To Lake Winnipeg And Southward To Virginia And Missouri, But Is Most Abundant In ...

Bass_2
Bass (morone Labrax), A Fish Of The Sea-perch Family (ser Ranidae) Found In The Mediter Ranean And On The Atlantic Coasts Of Europe. It Is A Silvery, Blue Backed Fish, With A Strong Spi Nous Dorsal Fin ; It Grows To 3 F T. In Length. Bass Swim In Shoals ...

Bass_3
Bass (the Same Word As "base" And So Pronounced, But In Fluenced In Spelling By The Ital. Basso), Deep, Low, Especially In Music, The Lowest Part In The Harmony Of A Composition, The Low Est Male Voice, Or The Lowest-pitched Of A Class Of Instruments, As The Bass-clarinet. ...

Bast
Bast, The Common Name For The Outer Part (phloem) Of The Vascular Bundle Of A Plant. The Term Is Also Applied To Piassaba Fibre, Etc. ...

Bastar
Bastar, The Largest Of The Feudatory States Of The Central Provinces Of India. It Has An Area Of 13,062 Square Miles And A Pop. (1931) Of 524,721, And Is The Southernmost Tract Of The Province. Its Boundaries On The East And South-east Are The Jeypore Zamindari Of The Vizagatam Agency ...

Bastard
Bastard, A Person Born Out Of Legal Wedlock. Amongst The Romans, Bastards Were Classified As Nothi, Children Born In Concubinage, And Spurii, Those Not So Born. Both Classes Had A Right Of Succession To Their Mother, And The Nothi Were Entitled To Support From Their Father, But Had No Rights ...

Bastarnae
Bastarnae, The Easternmost People Of The Germanic Race Who Were The First To Come Into Contact With The Ancient World And The Slays. Originally Settled In Galicia And The Buko Vina, They Appeared On The Lower Danube About 200 B.c., And Were Used By Philip V. Of Macedon Against His ...

Basti
Basti, A Town And District Of British India, In The Gorakh Pur Division Of The United Provinces. The Town, A Collection Of Villages, Is On The River Kuana, 4om. From Gorakhpur By Railway. The Population In 1931 Was 22,526. The District, Area 2,819 Sq.m., Is One Vast Level Plain, Draining ...

Bastia
Bastia, City, East Coast Of Corsica, 98m. N.n.e. Of Ajaccio By Rail. Pop. (1931), 40,300. It Is The Largest Town On The Island Because It Is Near The Mainland And It Is The Outlet For The Fertile Northern Valleys. The Centre, Terra Vecchia, Is The Original Fishing Village, While The ...

Bastide
Bastide [provençal Bastida, Building], An Old Military Word For The Fortified Towns Founded In South-western France In The Middle Ages, And Corresponding To The Villes Neuves Of Northern France. They Were Established By The Abbeys, The Nobles And The Crown, And Were Intended To Serve As Defensive Posts For Sparsely ...

Bastille
Bastille, Originally Any Fortified Building Forming Part Of A System Of Defence Or Attack. The Name, Which Is Derived From The Old French Bastir, To Build, Was Especially Applied To Several Of The Principal Points In The Ancient Fortifications Of Paris. In The Reign Of King John, Or Even Earlier, ...

Bastinado
Bastinado, The European Name For A Form Of Punish Ment Common In The East, Especially In Turkey (formerly), Persia And China. It Consists In Blows With A Light Stick Or Lath Of Bam Boo Upon The Soles Of The Feet Or On The Buttocks (see Flogging). ...

Bastion
Bastion, A Projecting Work Forming A Part Of A Line Of Fortifications (through The Fr. From Late Lat. Bastire, To Build), Designed So As To Bring Flanking Fire In Front Of The Neighbouring Bastions And Along The Curtain Connecting Them. In The Following Figure, A Is The "salient" Angle, Ab ...

Basutoland Or Lesuto
Basutoland Or Lesuto, A District Of South Africa, Bounded By Natal, The Cape Province And The Orange Free State. It Extends From 35' N. To 3o° 3o' S. And From 27° E. To 29° 25' E. The Area Is Estimated At About 11,700 Square Miles. ...

Bat
Bat, A Flying Mammal, With Greatly Elongated Fore Limbs Espe Cially Adapted For Flight. Bats Move About More Exclusively By Flying Than Any Other Group Of Animals, For, Unlike Most Birds And Insects, Their Limbs And Feet Are Not Adapted For Walking. There Are About 90o Species Of Bats, Constituting ...

Batac
Batac, A Municipality (with Administration Centre And 35 Barrios Or Districts) Of The Province Of Ilocos Norte, Luzon, Philippine Islands, I 2m. S. Of Laoag The Capital. Pop. (1918), 23,986, Of Whom 10,962 Were Males And Four Whites. Tobacco And Rice Are Among The Most Important Products, And There Is ...

Batak
Batak (not To Be Confused With The Batta [q.v.] Or Battak Of Sumatra), A Tribe Of Apparently Pre-dravidian Stock, With Pos Sibly A Negrito Blend, Inhabiting The Interior Of Palawan In The Philippines. They Live By Hunting, Supplemented By Meagre Patches Of Occasional Cultivation ; One House Is Occupied By ...

Batala
Batala, A Town In British India, In The Gurdaspur District Of The Punjab. Pop. (1931) 204. It Is An Important Centre Of Trade, With Manufactures Of Cot Ton And Silk Goods, Shawls, Brass Ware, Soap And Leather. ...

Batalha
Batalha (i.e., Battle), A Town Of Portugal, 8m. South Of Leiria. Pop. (193o), 5,226. Ba Talha Is Chiefly Interesting For Its Great Dominican Monastery Of Santa Maria Da Victoria ("st. Mary Of The Victory"), Also Known As Batalha. In The Battle Fought On The Plain Between Can Oeira And Aljubarrota, ...

Batang
Batang (re-named Baanfu In 1908) Is An Important Frontier-town In The Sino-tibetan Borderland (30°•0' N. And 99°.30' E.) It Is Situated In A Beautiful And Fertile Plain At A'point On The Upper Yangtze Where The Great River Which Above Batang Flows Through A Wide Valley Begins Its Tortuous And Torrential ...

Batangas
Batangas, A Municipality (with Administration Centre And 49 Barrios Or Districts), Port Of Entry, And Capital Of The Province Of Batangas, Luzon, Philippine Islands, Near The Batangas River, About Im. From Its Mouth On The East Coast Of The Gulf Of Bat Angas, And About 65m. S. By E. Of ...

Batavia
Batavia, A Residency Of Java, Dutch East Indies, Under The Government Of West Java, Bounded East, South And West By The Residencies Of Krawang, Buitenzorg, And Bantam, And North By The Java Sea. It Also Comprises Small Islands, Including The Thousand Islands Group (actually About 8o), With A Total Area ...

Batavia_2
Batavia, A City And Sea-port, On The North-east Coast Of Java, The Capital Of The Dutch East Indies. Population (193o), Excluding Meester Cornelis, 435,184, Composed Of 31,130 Euro Peans And Eurasians, 325,978 Natives, And 77,076 Foreign Asiatics, Including Chinese. The Average Mean Temperature Is 79° And Average Rainfall 72.31 With ...

Batavia_3
Batavia, A City In North-west New York, U.s.a., Midway Between Buffalo And Rochester, On Tonawanda Creek, At An Ele Vation Of 9ooft. ; The County Seat Of Genesee County. It Is Served By The New York Central, The Erie And The Lehigh Valley Rail Ways. The Area Is 5.7sq.m., And ...

Batement Lights
Batement Lights, In Architecture, The Lights In The Upper Part Of A Perpendicular Window, Which Are Only Half The Width Of Those Below. ...

Batesville
Batesville, A City Of Arkansas, U.s.a., In The Foot-hills Of The Ozarks, 9om. N.n.e. Of Little Rock, On The White River And The Missouri Pacific Railroad; The County Seat Of Inde Pendence County. The Population In 193o Was 4,484. Manganese Is Mined, And There Are Marble Quarries In The Vicinity. ...

Bath
Bath, City, Municipal, And County And Parliamentary Borough Of North-east Somersetshire, England, On The G.w.r., L.m.s., And Somerset And Dorset Railways. Pop. (1921) 68,669; And In 1931, 68,8oi. It Lies On The River Avon, 12 Miles S.e. Of Bristol, And Has Been Called The Most Nobly Placed And Best-built City ...

Bathgate
Bathgate, Municipal And Police Burgh, Linlithgowshire, Scotland, 19m. W. By S. Of Edinburgh By The L.n.e. Railway. Pop. (1931) 50,097. Limestone, Coal, Ironstone, Shale And Fireclay Are Worked. Silver Also Was Once Mined And The Old Workings Have Been Reopened In Recent Years. The Manufactures Include Paraf Fin, Paper, And ...

Batholith
Batholith, In Geology, A Term Applied To A Large Mass Of Intrusive Igneous Rock Usually Showing Transgressive Relations To The Enclosing Country Rock (from Gr. (3ao15s, Deep, And A Stone). The Name Was First Used To Describe Those Largest Of All Intrusions, Characteristically Developed In Great Mountain Ranges, And Thus ...

Bathos
Bathos, Properly Depth, The Bottom Or Lowest Part Of Any Thing. The Current Usage For A Descent "from The Sublime To The Ridiculous" Is Due To Pope's Satire "bathos" (miscellanies, 28), "the Art Of Sinking In Poetry." The Title Was A Travesty Of Longinus' Essay, On The Sublime. ...

Baths
Baths. The Word Bath Is Used : (1) For The Process Of Im Mersing The Body In Some Medium Other Than Atmospheric Air, For The Purpose Of Cleanliness Or As A Cure ; And ( 2 ) For The Build Ing Or Room In Which Such Immersion Takes Place. Separate ...

Bathurst
Bathurst, A City Of Bathurst County, New South Wales, Australia. Pop. (1933) 10,415. It Is Situated On The South Bank Of The Macquarie River, At An Elevation Of 2,153 Ft., In A Fertile Undulating Plain On The West Side Of The Blue Mountains. Bathurst Is The Centre Of The Chief ...

Bathvillite
Bathvillite, A Naturally ,occurring Organic Substance. It Is An Amorphous, Opaque, And Very Friable Material Of F Awn Brown Colour, Filling Cavities In The Torbanite Or Boghead Coal Of Bathville, Scotland. It Has A Specific Gravity Of 1•o1, And Is Insoluble In Benzene. ...

Bathybius
Bathybius, A Slimy Substance, At One Time Supposed To Exist In Great Masses In The Depths Of The Ocean, And To Consist Of Undifferentiated Protoplasm. Regarding It As An Organism Which Represented The Simplest Form Of Life, Huxley, About 1868, Named It Bathybius Haeckelii. But Investigations Carried Out By The ...

Bathycles
Bathycles, An Ionian Sculptor Of Magnesia, Was Commis Sioned By The Spartans To Make A Marble Throne For The Statue Of Apollo At Amyclae, About 550 B.c. Pausanias (iii. 18) Gives A Detailed Description Of This Monument, Which Is Of The Greatest Value To Us, Showing The Character Of Ionic ...

Bath_2
Bath, A City Of Maine, U.s.a., 3om. N.e. Of Portland On The West Bank Of The Kennebec River, 12m. From The Ocean ; A Port Of Entry And The County Seat Of Sagadahoc County. It Is Served By The Maine Central Railroad And By Steamers. The Population In 1930 Was ...

Bath_3
Bath, A Village Of New York, U.s.a., 4omc. N.w. Of Elmira And 6m. S. Of Lake Keuka, At An Altitude Of 1,1o3ft.; On The Cohocton River And The Lackawanna And The Erie Railways. It Is The County Seat Of Steuben County. Population 1930 Was 4,015 U.s. Census. Its Industrial Plants ...

Batik
Batik, A Javanese Word Meaning Wax Painting—the Applica Tion Of A Wax "resist" To Various Materials Which Are Afterwards Dyed, And Certain Portions Of Which Are Protected By The Wax So That They Do Not Absorb The Dye, Leaving As A Result A Pattern Or Design On Them. The Resist ...

Batley
Batley, Municipal Borough, West Riding Of Yorkshire, England, 8m. S.s.w. Of Leeds. Pop. (1931) 34,573. It Is At The Junction Between The E. Pennines And The Yorkshire Plain, And As Such Became An Important Market Town In The I8th And Early I9th Century. Its Situation On The South-west Yorkshire Coalfield ...

Batman
Batman, From French, Bat, A Kind Of Pack-saddle, Hence Bat,horse (cheval De Bat), A Horse Carrying A Bat Or Pack, The Batman Being The Servant In Charge Of The Bat-horse. In Course Of Time The Batman Was Given Duties To Perform More Immediately About The Person Who Employed Him, E.g., ...

Baton Rouge
Baton Rouge, The Capital Of Louisiana, U.s.a., And Of East Baton Rouge Parish, On The Bank Of The Missis Sippi River, At The Head Of Deep-water Navi Gation, About Tom. N.w. Of New Orleans. It Is On The Jefferson And The Mississippi River Scenic Highways ; Is Served By The ...

Baton
Baton, The Truncheon Carried By A Field-marshal As A Sign Of Authority, And By A Police Constable (fr. Baton, Baston, From Late Lat. Basto, A Stick Or Staff) ; In Heraldry (q.v.), The Fourth Part Of A Bend; In English Coats Of Arms, Only As A Mark Of Illegitimacy, The ...

Batrachia
Batrachia, A Term Sometimes Used For That Class Of Verte Brates More Properly Called Amphibia. The Class Includes The Frogs, Toads, Salamanders And Caecilians. As Pointed Out In The Article Amphibia, The Term Batrachia Is A Synonym Of Salientia. It Is, However, Rarely Used In This Sense By Modern Students ...

Batson Or Betson Bateson
Bateson, Batson Or Betson, Thomas (157o 163o), Important English Madrigal Composer. He Was Organist Of Chester Cathedral From About 1599 To 1608 And Is Believed To Have Been The First Musical Graduate Of Trinity College, Dublin. ...

Batta
Batta (pl. Battak, Not To Be Confused With The Batak Tribe Of Palawan In The Philippines), A Proto-malayan Tribe, Probably Derived From Mixed Mongol And Indonesian Stock, Of North Sumatra, Living In Settled Communities With Hereditary Chiefs, Popular Assemblies And Written Codes Of Law. The Tribe Is Literate, Using A ...

Battaglia Terme
Battaglia Terme, Urban District, Venetia, Italy, Prov Ince Of Padua, I'm. S.s.w. From Padua. Population (1931) Of The Commune 2,423. It Is On The Eastern Edge Of The Volcanic Euganean Hills, And Its Warm Saline Springs And Natural Vapour Grotto Led The 17th-century Owner, Marchese Selvatico-estense, To Build A Palladian ...

Battakhin
Battakhin, African "arabs" Of Semitic Stock. They Occupy The Banks Of The Blue Nile Near Khartum, And It Was Against Them That General Gordon Fought Most Of His Battles Near The Town. Their Sheikh, El Obeid, Routed Gordon's Troops On The 4th Of September 1884, A Defeat Which Led To ...

Battalion
Battalion, A Unit Or Military Organization Numbering From 500-1,000 Men, The Latter Figure Being Usually The Standard In Modern Times. The Term Is Used In Nearly Every Army, And Is De Rived Through Fr. From It. Battaglione, Med. Lat. Battalia (see Battle). "battalion" In The 16th And 1 7th Centuries ...

Battambang Or Battambong
Battambang Or Battambong (locally Phrata Bong), The Chief Town Of The North-western Division Of Cambodia, Formerly Capital Of Monton Khmer, I.e., "the Cambodian Divi Sion," One Of The Eastern Provinces Of Siam. It Is In The Midst Of A Fertile Plain And On The River Sang Ke, Which Flows Into ...

Battanni
Battanni, A Small Tribe On The Waziri Border Of The North West Frontier Province Of India From Bannu To The Gomal Val Ley. There Are Three Sections. In The Plains The Land Is Divided Into Many Small Divisions, Ndlds, Each Forming A Single Plot, Owned By A Number Of Families ...

Batta_2
Batta, An Anglo-indian Military Term, Probably Derived From The Canarese Bhatta (rice In The Husk), Meaning A Special Allowance Made To Officers, Soldiers Or Other Public Servants In The Field. ...

Battel Or Battels
Battel Or Battels, A Word Used At Oxford University For The Food Ordered By Members Of The College As Distinct From The Usual "commons" ; And Hence College Accounts For Board And Provisions Supplied From Kitchen And Buttery, And, Generally, The Whole Of A Man's College Accounts. ...

Batten
Batten, In Industry A Term Used In Joinery For A Board, Not More Than 4 To 7 In. Broad Or 3 In. Thick, Employed For Various Purposes, Such As For Strengthening Or Holding Together Laths And Other Wood-work. It Is Also Applied To The Strips Of Wood Used In Roofing ...

Battenberg
Battenberg, The Name Of A Family Of German Counts, Which Died Out About 1314, Whose Seat Was The Castle Of Keller Burg, Near Battenberg, A Small Place In The Prussian Province Of Hesse-nassau. The Title Was Revived In 1851, When Alexander (1823-88), A Younger Son Of Louis Ii., Grand-duke Of ...

Batter
Batter, An Architectural Term Used Of The Sloping Surface Of A Wall Which Is Thicker At The Base Than At The Top. Battered Walls Are Commonly Used Where Great Strength And Weight Are Necessary In The Lower Parts Of A Construction But Not In The Upper, As In Retaining Walls ...

Battering Ram
Battering Ram, A Military Engine Used Before The Invention Of Cannon, For Breaking Down The Walls Of Besieged Fortresses. It Consisted Of A Long Heavy Beam Of Timber, Armed At The Extremity With Iron Fashioned Something Like The Head Of A Ram. In Its Simplest Form The Beam Was Carried ...

Battersea
Battersea, A South-western Metropolitan And Parlia Mentary Borough Of London, England, Bounded North By The Thames, North-east By Lambeth, And South-east, South And West By Wandsworth. Pop. The Principal Thorough Fares Are Wandsworth Road And Battersea Park And York Roads From East To West, Connected North And South With The ...

Battery
Battery, The Action Of Beating, Especially In Law The Unlaw Ful Wounding Of Another (see Assault). The Term Is Applied To The Apparatus Used In Battering, Hence Its Use In Military Organiza Tion For The Unit Of Mobile Artillery Of All Kinds. (see Battery ...

Battiadae
Battiadae, Descendants Of Battus Of Thera, Who In The Latter Half Of The 7th Century B.c. Led A Colony From Thera To Africa, On The Instructions Of The Delphic Oracle. This Colony Was Given The Name Cyrene, And Was Ruled By His Descendants For Seven Generations As Kings. On The ...

Batticaloa
Batticaloa, The Administrative Capital Of The Eastern Province Of Ceylon, On The East Coast 69m. South-south-east Of Trincomalee, Situated On An Island In Lat. 44' N. And Long. 81 ° 52' E. It Is Of Importance For Its Haven And The Adjacent Salt Lagoons. The Population Of The Town In ...

Battle Abbey Roll
Battle Abbey Roll. This Is Popularly Supposed To Have Been A List Of William The Conqueror's Companions Preserved At Battle Abbey, On The Site Of His Victory Over Harold. It Is Known To Us Only From 16th Century Versions Of It Published By Leland, Holinshed, And Duchesne, All More Or ...

Battle Creek
Battle Creek, A City Of Calhoun County, Michigan, U.s.a., 115m. West Of Detroit, At The Confluence Of Battle Creek With The Kalamazoo River. It Is On Federal Highway 12 ; Is Served By The Michigan Central, The Grand Trunk, And The Michigan (electric) Railways; And Has A Municipal Airport Just ...

Battle Of Barrosa
Barrosa, Battle Of, 1811. In Feb. 1811 The Garrison Of Cadiz Made A Sortie In The Hope Of Raising The Siege (see Peninsular War). Io,000 Spaniards And 4,00o British Under The Spaniard Lapena Sailed To Tarifa And Thence Marched Back Towards Cadiz, Intending To Take The Besiegers In Rear. Victor, ...

Battle Of Bautzen
Battle Of Bautzen, 1813 The Town Gives Its Name To A Great Battle In Which, On May 20 And 1813, Napoleon I. Defeated An Allied Army Of Russians And Prussians (see Napoleonic Campaigns). The Position Chosen By The Allies As That In Which To Receive The Attack Of Napoleon Ran ...

Battle Of Blore Heath
Blore Heath, Battle Of. This Was The Second Im Portant Battle Of The Wars Of The Roses (q.v.), And Ended Like That Of St. Albans Four Years Before In A Yorkist Victory. The Site Is Near Market Drayton, And The Date Was Sept. ...

Battle Of Bosworth Field
Bosworth Field, Battle Of, A Decisive Battle Fought On August 22, 1485, On Ground I 2m. W. Of Leicester, From Which City King Richard Iii. Moved Out With His Host. Its Military Insignificance Is Altogether Disproportionate To Its Political Results, Which Were To Place The Tudor Dynasty On The English ...

Battle
Battle, Urban District, Sussex, England, 541 M. S.e. By S. From London By The Southern Railway And 7 M. From The Sea At Hastings. Pop. Its Name Is Derived From The Conflict In 1066, Which Ensured To William The Norman The Crown Of England (see Also Battle Abbey Roll). Before ...

Battledore And Shuttlecock
Battledore And Shuttlecock, A Game Played By Two Persons With Small Rackets, Called Battledores, Made Of Parchment Or Rows Of Gut Stretched Across Wooden Frames, And Shuttlecocks, Made Of A Base Of Some Light Material, Like Cork, With Trimmed Feathers Fixed Round The Top. The Object Of The Players Is ...

Battlement
Battlement, A Term Given To The Parapet Of A Wall Consisting Of Alternating Low Portions Known As "crenels" (hence "crenellated" Walls With Battlements) And High Portions Called "merlons." Battlements Were Devised In Order That Warriors Might Be Protected By The Merlons And Yet Be Able To Discharge Arrows Or Other ...

Battles Of The Siege
Siege Of; Frontiers, Battles Of The.) Blbliqgraphy.--marscha1l Von Bieberstein Liittich-namur (1918) ; E. Von Ludendorff, Meine Kriegseriznerungen (1919; Eng. Trans., My War Memories, 1919) ; H. R. A. Von Kluck, Der Marsch Au/ Paris (192o; Eng. Trans. The March On Paris, 192o) ; C. J. Dupont, Le Haut Commandement Allemand ...

Battleship
Battleship. It Is The Mistaken Notion Of An Uninformed Section Of The Press And Public That The Battleship Is A Warship Of A Settled Type And That, By Reason Of New Forms Of Attack, This Type Is Now, In Great Measure, Obsolete. Actually The Term "battleship" Implies The "predominant Surface ...

Battle_2
Battle, A General Engagement Between The Armed Forces, Naval Or Military, Of Enemies. The Word Is Derived From The Fr. Bataille, And This, Like The Ital. Battaglia, And Span. Batalla, Comes From The Popular Lat. Battalia. Battalia Was Used For The Array Of Troops For Battle, And Hence Was Applied ...

Battue Batum
Battue Batum They Were Designed Ito The Maximum Standard Displacement Al Lowed, Viz., 35,o Ns, And They Carry 9-16" Guns In Triple Mountings With Heavily Armoured Gun-shields, All Of Them Forward Of The Machinery, The Middle Mountings Being At A Higher Level Than The Others. ' Guns Are Carried As ...

Battue
Battue, The Beating Of Game From Cover Under The Sports Men's Fire; By Analogy The Word Is Used To Describe Any Slaughter Of Defenceless Crowds. ...

Battus
Battus, The Legendary Founder Of The Greek Colony Of Cyrene In Libya (c. 63o B.e.). The Greeks Who Accompanied Him Were, Like Himself, Natives Of Thera, And Descended Partly From The Race Of The Minyae. Various Accounts Are Given Both Of The Founding Of Cyrene And Of The Origin Of ...

Batu Khan
Batu Khan, Mongol Chief, The Grandson Of Jenghiz Khan, Succeeded His Father, Juji, As King Of The Kipchaks In 1223, And In 1229 Followed The New Khan, Ogdai, In His Expedition To China. On His Return The Latter Sent Batu To Europe At The Head Of An In Vading Army ...

Batu Or Rock Islands
Batu Or Rock Islands (dutch Batoe), Three Greater And 48 Lesser Islands, Dutch East Indies, W. Of Sumatra, Between O° 1o' N. To O° 45' S. And 97° 50'-98° 35' E., Belonging To The Ayerbangi District Of The Lowlands Of Padang (sumatra). They Are Separated By The Strait Of Sibirut ...

Batum
Batum, Chief Town Of The Autonomous Adzhar S.s.r., On The East Coast Of The Black Sea. Lat. 41° 41' N., Long. 41° 38' E.; Alt. 3of T. ; Average Rainfall Per Annum 93.3in., The Highest In The Caucasus; Average Temp., Jan. 43° F., Aug., 73.8° F.; Pop. (1926) 45,45o. Batum ...

Batyphone
Batyphone, A Contrabass Clarinet Which Was The Outcome Of F. W. Wieprecht's Endeavour To Obtain A Contrabass For The Reed Instruments. In Practice, However, The Instrument Was Found To Be Of Little Use, And It Was Superseded By The Bass Tuba. A Similar Attempt Was Made In 1843 By Adolphe ...

Bauan
Bauan, A Municipality (with Administration Centre And 38 Barrios Or Districts), Of The Province Of Batangas, Luzon, Philip Pine Islands, At The Head Of Batangas Bay, About 54m. S. Of Manila By Land And 91m. By Sea. Pop. (1918), 27,729, Of Whom 13,219 Were Males And None Were White. It ...

Bauble
Bauble, A Word Applied To A Stick With A Weight Attached, Used In Weighing; To A Child's Toy; And Especially To The Mock Symbol Of Office Carried By A Court Jester, A Baton Terminating In A Figure Of Folly With Cap And Bells; Hence A Term For Any Triviality Or ...

Bauchi
Bauchi, A Region Of British West Africa, Part Of Two Prov Inces, Bauchi And Plateau, Of Northern Nigeria, And Noted For Its Tin Mines. It Lies North Of The Benue River And West Of Bornu. It Includes The Central Nigerian Plateau—a Great Treeless Plain Over 4,000f T. Above Sea-level, Separated ...

Baulk Or Balk
Baulk Or Balk, A Word Of Teutonic Origin Meaning A Ridge Or Beam. The Ridge Left Unploughed Between Furrows Or Ploughed Fields; Also The Uncultivated Strip Of Land Used As A Boundary In The "open-field" System Of Agriculture. From The Meaning Of Something Left Untouched Comes That Of A Hindrance ...

Baumes Laws
Baumes Laws, A Series Of Criminal Laws Enacted In New York State In 1926 Upon The Recommendation Of The Crime Com Mission Of Which Senator Caleb H. Baumes Was Chairman. The Passing Of These Laws Was Induced By An Unusually Active Period Of Wanton Crime, Involving Frequent Bloodshed. One Of ...

Bautzen
Bautzen, Capital Of The Eastern Division Of The Land Of Saxony, Germany. Pop. (189o) 21,515; (1933) It Lies On The Right Bank Of The Spree, Not Far From Its Source, 68oft. Above Sea And 32m. E.n.e. Of Dresden. The Settlement Dates From Before The Conquest Of Lusatia By Henry The ...

Bauxite P
Bauxite. P. Berthier (1821) Discovered That A Non-plas Tic, Clay-like Substance From Les Baux, Near Arles (france) Was Practically Devoid Of Silica, Either Free Or In Combination. His Analysis Of It Indicated 52.o% Alumina, 27.6% Ferric Oxide, And 20.4% Combined Water. Berthier Referred To It As "le Mineral Des Beaux." ...

Bavai
Bavai, Town Of North France, Department Of Nord, 15m. E.s.e. Of Valenciennes. Pop. (1931) 1,538. It Has Been A Focus Of Important Roads Since Early Times. The Capital Of The Nervii, It Was Known To The Romans As Bagacum Or Bavacum, And Was The Meet Ing Place Of Eight Of ...

Bavaria
Bavaria (ger. Bayern), The Largest Of The Lander Of Ger Many In Area And Population, Next To Prussia. It Consists Of Two Distinct And Unequal Portions, Bavaria Proper, And The Palatinate Of The Rhine, Which Lie From 25 To 4om. Apart And Are Separated By The Lander Of Baden And ...

Baveno
Baveno, Village, Piedmont, Italy, Province Of Novara 13m. N.n.w. Of Arona By Rail. A Resort With Fine Valleys. Its Red Granite Quarries Supplied Columns For Milan Cathedral, S. Paolo Fuori Le Mura At Rome, The Galleria Vittorio Emanuele At Milan, Etc. Pop. (1931) 1,826 (town), 3,122 (commune). ...

Bawbee
Bawbee, The Scottish Name For A Half-penny Or Other Small Coin, And Hence Used Of Money Generally. A Writer In 1573, Quoted In Tytler's History Of Scotland, Speaks Of "a Coin Called A Bawbee, • • • Which Is In Value English One Penny And A Quarter." The Most Plausible ...

Bay City
Bay City, A City Of Michigan, United States, Loom. N.n.w. Of Detroit, Built On Both Sides Of The Saginaw'river Near Its Outfall Into Saginaw Bay (lake Huron) ; A Port Of Entry And The County Seat Of Bay County. It Has 17m. Of River Frontage, And The Channel Has A ...