Home >> Encyclopedia-britannica-volume-7-part-2-damascus-education-in-animals >> Dresden to Dulwich

Encyclopedia Britannica

Volume 7, Part 2: Damascus to Education in Animals

Loading


Dresden
Dresden, A City Of Germany, Capital Of The Land Of Saxony, 71 M. E.s.e. From Leipzig And Iii M. S. From Berlin By Railway. Pop. Mainly Lutheran. It Lies 402 Ft. Above The Baltic, In A Broad Valley On Both Banks Of The Elbe. The Prospect Of Cupolas, Towers, Spires ...

Dresdner Bank
Dresdner Bank, German Bank Was Established In Dresden In 1872 By A Founders' Syndicate Headed By Consul Eugen Gutmann Taking Over The Banking House Of M. Kaskel In Dresden. The Office In Berlin, Which Is Now The Head Office Of The Bank, Was Established In 1881. The Bank Disposed In ...

Dress Manufacturing
Dress Manufacturing. No Phase In The History Of Dress Is More Remarkable Than That Which Has Been Witnessed In The Opening Of The Loth Century. Class Distinctions, In So Far As They Are Indicated Outwardly By Dress, Have Disappeared. It Is Not Easy To Detect Differences Of Degree Among The ...

Dress
Dress (from The Fr. Dresser, To Set Out, Arrange, Formed From Lat. Directus, Arranged, Dirigere, To Direct, Arrange), A Sub Stantive Of Which The Most Usual Meaning Is That Of Clothing Or Costume In General, Or, Specifically, The Principal Outer Garment Worn By A Woman. The Verb "to Dress" Has ...

Dresser
Dresser, In Furniture, A Form Of Sideboard. The Name Is Derived From The Fr. Dressoir, A Piece Of Furniture Used To Range Or Dresser The More Costly Appointments Of The Table. The Appliance Is The Direct Descendant Of The Credence And The Buffet, And Is, Indeed, A Much More Legitimate ...

Dressing Station
Dressing Station, A Military Term For The Place Where Wounded Are Collected And Attended To By The Medical Personnel Of A Field Ambulance. It Is Thus Normally Next In Rear Of The "first-aid," Or "regimental Aid Post." ...

Dreux
Dreux, A Town Of North-western France, Capital Of An Arrondissement In The Department Of Eure-et-loir, 27 M. N.n.w. Of Chartres By Rail. Pop. (1931) 9,861. Dreux Was The Capital Of The Gallic Tribe Of The Durocasses. In 1188 It Was Taken And Burnt By The English; And In 1562 Gaspard ...

Drewenz
Drewenz, A River Of Germany, A Right-bank Tributary Of The Vistula. It Rises On The Plateau Of Hohenstein In East Prus Sia, 5 M. S.w. Of The Town Of Hohenstein. After Passing Through The Lake Of Drewenz (7 M. Long), It Flows South-west Through Flat Marshy Country, And Forms, From ...

Driburg
Driburg, A Town And Spa Of Germany, In Prussian West Phalia, Pleasantly Situated On The Aa And The Railway Soest Hoxter-berlin. Pop. (1925) 3,000. It Has Glass Manufactures. It Is Celebrated For Its Saline-ferruginous Springs, Discovered In 766, And Since 1779 Largely Frequented In Summer. In The Vicinity Are The ...

Driffield
Driffield (officially Great Driffield), Urban District, Buck Rose Parliamentary Division, East Riding Of Yorkshire, England. It Is 192 M. N. Of Hull, With Which It Is Connected By A Navigable Canal. Population Of Urban District (1931) 5,916. The Town Is Served By The L.n.e. Railway And Is A Junction For ...

Drill
Drill. In Military Science, The Word Drillen Was Used In Dutch, German And Danish From The 17th Century For Training In Military Exercises And Was Adopted Into English In The Same Sense. The Origin Of The Application Seems To Be In The Primary Sense Of "to Turn Round," From The ...

Drill_2
Drill, Papio Leucophoeus, A Large Baboon Inhabiting The Coast Of Guinea. It Is Smaller And Less Fierce Than Its Relative, The Mandrill, And Is Further Distinguished By The Black Colour Of The Bare Face. ...

Drink Bill
Drink Bill. In Great Britain, This Term Has For Many Years Been Applied To An Annual Statement Issued Up To 1909 By The Late Dr. Dawson Burns And Since That Date By George B. Wil Son, Showing The Annual Expenditure On And Consumption Of Alco Holic Liquors In The United ...

Drinking Vessels
Drinking Vessels. Nature Provided The Primitive Man With Various Forms Of Drinking Vessels, Such As The Coconut, The Gourd, Eggs Of The Larger Birds, Shells And Even The Human Skull, Many Of Which Have Been Of Such Practical Use That They Have Lasted To The Present Day. The First Artificial ...

Driving
Driving, A Word Used In A Restricted Sense For The Art Of Controlling And Directing Draught Animals From A Coach Or Other Conveyance Or Movable Machine To Which They Are Harnessed For The Purpose Of Traction (from "to Drive"; I.e. Generally To Pro Pel, Force Along Or In, A Word ...

Drogheda
Drogheda (droch'e-da), Municipal Borough And Seaport, On The Southern Border Of Co. Louth, Ireland, On The River Boyne, About 4 M. From Its Mouth In Drogheda Bay, And 3i I M. N. By W. From Dublin By Rail. Pop. (1926), 12,688. The Earliest Notices Call The Town Inver-colpa Or The ...

Drohobycz
Drohobycz, A Polish Town In The Province Of Lemberg, Capital Of A District Which Contains The Largest Oilfield In The Country. Pop. (1931), 32,622. Oil Was First Found At Boryslaw And Tustanowice In 1904, And Reached Its Highest Production In 1909. The Oilfield Produced (1924) 673,177 Tons, 78% Of The ...

Droit Administratif
Droit Administratif. French Administrative Law May Be Described As That Section Of Law Which Establishes The Dif Ferent Administrative Organs Of The State And Defines Their Powers As Regards Individuals. It Will Thus Be Noticed At Once That There Is A Very Close Connection Between French Constitutional And Administrative Law ...

Droit
Droit, A Legal Title, Claim Or Due ; A Term Used In English Law In The Phrase Droits Of Admiralty, Certain Rights Or Perquisites Assigned By The Crown To The Lord High Admiral. (see Also Wreck.) The Most Important Of These In Modern Times Consisted Of Ships And Goods Captured ...

Droitwich
Droitwich, Market Town And Municipal Borough, Evesham Parliamentary Division, Worcestershire, England, 54 M. N.n.e. Of Worcester, And 126 M. N.w. From London By The G.w.r. Pop. 4,553. It Is Served Also By The L.m.s. Railway. It Stands On The River Salwarpe, A Tributary Of The Severn, Being Connected With The ...

Drome
Drome, A Department Of South-east France, Formed Of Parts Of Dauphine And Provence, And Bounded On The West By The Rhone, Which Separates It From Ardeche, North And North-east By Isere, East By Hautes-alpes, South-east By Basses-alpes And South By Vaucluse; Area 2,533 Sq.m. ; Pop. (1931) 267,080. Drome Is ...

Dromedary
Dromedary, A Name For Swift Riding Camels, Of Either The Arabian (one-humped) Or The Bactrian (two-humped) Species. See Camel. ...

Dromore
Dromore, A Market Town Of Co. Down, Ireland, On The Upper Lagan, 174 M. S.w. Of Belfast By Rail. Pop. Of Urban District (1926), 2,229. The Bishopric Here Grew Out Of An Abbey Of Canons Regular Attributed To St. Colman In The 6th Century, And Was United In 1842 To ...

Dromos
Dromos, The Open Air Passage, Enclosed Between Stone Walls, Leading Down To The Entrance Of Greek "beehive" Tombs. ...

Drone
Drone, In Music, The Bass Pipe Or Pipes Of Instruments Of The Bagpipe Type, Having No Lateral Holes And Therefore Giving Out The Same Note Without Intermission As Long As There Is Wind In The Bag, Thus Forming A Continuous Pedal, Or Drone Bass. The Drone Pipe Has, Instead Of ...

Dronfield
Dronfield, Urban District, North-eastern Parliamentary Division Of Derbyshire, England, 6 M. S. Of Sheffield, On The L.m.s. Railway. Pop. It Is On The River Drone, A Tributary Of The Rother. In The District Are Numerous Coal Mines And Iron And Steel Works. The Church Of St. John The Baptist, With ...

Drongo Or
Drongo Or King Crow, An Old World Group Of Birds Of The Family Dicruridae; The Plumage Is Usually Black And The Tail Forked. The Drongos Inhabit Africa, South-eastern Asia And The Malayan Region To Australia. The Largest Genus, Dicrurus, In Cludes The Black Drongo (d. Ater), The Ashy Drongo (d. ...

Drop Forging
Drop Forging. Drop Forging Is The Production In Quan Tity Of Articles In Metal By Means Of A Falling Weight Forcing The Heated Material Into A Die. It Is Only Within The Last 6o Years Or So That Drop Forging As It Is Known To-day Has Been Practised. Since The ...

Dropsy
Dropsy, The Name Given To A Collection Of Serous Fluid In All Or Any Of The Cavities Of The Body, Or In The Meshes Of Its Tissues. Dropsy Of The Subcutaneous Connective Tissue Is Termed Oedema When It Is Localized And Limited In Extent ; When Diffuse It Is Termed ...

Dropwort
Dropwort, In Botany, The Common Name For Ulmaria Filipendula (family Rosaceae), Found In Dry Pastures. It Is A Perennial Herb, With Much-divided, Radical Leaves And An Erect Stem, 2 To 3 Ft. High, Bearing A Loose Terminal Inflorescence Of Small White Flowers, Closely Resembling Those Of The Nearly Allied Ulmaria ...

Droseraceae
Droseraceae, A Family Of Dicotyledenous Plants, Re Markable In That All Its Members Are Insectivorous. There Are Five Genera And About R Oo Species. Drosera, A Cosmopolitan Genus In Cluding About 90 Species, Has Three British And Seven North Amer Ican Representatives, Known As Sundews (q.v.). Dionaea, With A Single ...

Drosophila
Drosophila, A Genus Of Flies (diptera, Q.v.). Sev Eral Species, And In Particular The Fruit-fly, D. Melanogaster, Have Become Widely Known On Account Of The Exhaustive Investi Gation Of Their Hereditary Constitution By T. H. Morgan And Others. (see Gene ; Genetics ; Heredity.) ...

Drowning And Life Saving
Drowning And Life Saving. To "drown" Is To Suffer Or Inflict Death By Submersion In Water, Or Figuratively To Submerge Entirely In Water Or Some Other Liquid. As A Form Of Capital Punishment It Persisted In Europe Till The 18th Century. Death From Drowning Is The Re Sult Of Asphyxia ...

Drug Addiction
Drug Addiction May Be Defined As An Overpowering Impulse For Narcotism Or Intoxication By Any Drug Possessing Nar Cotic Or Intoxicating Properties. It Is Best Exemplified By The Overpowering Influence Possessed By Opium And Its Preparations, And Its Alkaloids Or Derivatives Such As Morphine And Heroin, And By Cocaine And ...

Drug
Drug, A District And Town Of British India In The Chhattisgarh Division Of The Central Provinces. The District Was Formed In 1906 From Portions Of The Districts Of Bilaspur And Raipur (qq.v.) . It Has An Area Of 4,645 Sq.m. And At That Time The Population, 676,00o, Showed A Large ...

Drug_2
Drug, Any Organic And Inorganic Substance Used In The Preparation Of Medicines, By Itself Or In Combination With Others, And Either Prepared By Some Method Or Used In A Natural State (see Pharmacology And Pharmacopoeia). In A Particular Sense "drug" Is Often Used Synonymously For Narcotics Or Poisonous Substances, And ...

Druidism
Druidism Was The Faith Of The Celtic Inhabitants Of Gaul Until The Time Of The Romanization Of Their Country, And Of The Celtic Population Of The British Isles Either Up To The Time Of The Romanization Of Britain, Or, In Parts Remote From Roman In Fluence, Up To The Period ...

Drum
Drum, The Name Given To A Well-known Percussion Musical Instrument And Also To Many Objects Resembling It In Shape. Early Forms Of The Word Are Drome Or Dromme, A Word Common To Many Teut. Languages, Cf. Dan. Tromme, Ger. Trommel; The Word Is Ultimately The Same As "trumpet," And Is ...

Drumright
Drumright, A City In One Of The Oil And Gas Fields Of Creek County, Oklahoma, U.s.a., 6om. N.e. Of Oklahoma City, Near The Cimarron River, And Served By The Santa Fe Railway. There Is An Airport, Cooks Field. The City Was Founded In 1912 And Incorporated In 1914. By 1920 ...

Drum_2
Drum, The Name Given To Certain Fishes Belonging To The Family Sciaenidae, So Called Because They Make A Peculiar Grunting Noise. The Sea Drum (pogonias Cromis), Found Along The Atlantic Coasts Of North And South America, Attains A Length Of Four Feet. The Body, Which Is Oblong, With An Elevated ...

Drunkenness
Drunkenness, A State Resulting From Excessive Drinking, Usually Of Alcohol (see Alcohol, Pathological Effects Of). It May Represent Either An Act Or A Habit, The Latter Consisting In Frequent Repetitions Of The Former. What Appears To Be "intoxication" May Arise From Many Dif Ferent Causes, E.g., Epilepsy, Fractured Skull, Intracranial ...

Druses
Druses, The Adherents Of An Esoteric Religion Founded In The 1 Ith Century After Christ By The Fatimid Caliph Of Egypt, Al-hakim Bi'amrillahi, The Son Of A Russian Mother, Who Pro Claimed Himself An Incarnation Of God, Established A Reign Of Terror At Cairo And Finally Disappeared Mysteriously (a.d. Ion). ...

Drusus Caesar
Drusus Caesar (c. 15 B.c.a.d. 23), Commonly Called Drusus Junior, To Distinguish Him From His Uncle Nero Claudius Drusus, Was The Only Son Of The Emperor Tiberius. He Was Consul Elect In A.d. 14, And On The Accession Of Tiberius Was Sent To Put Down A Mutiny Of The Troops ...

Dry Farming
Dry-farming. In Many Parts Of The World There Are Large Tracts Of Land Suitable For The Growth Of Crops But In Which The Rainfall Is Deficient. They Lie In A Different Category From Ac Tual Desert Areas Which Are, For The Most Part, So Lacking In Plant Food As To ...

Dry Point
Dry Point. Though Generally Classed As A Variety Of Etch Ing, And In Practice Often Combined With That Process, Dry-point Is, Strictly Speaking, A Kind Of Engraving. In Etching The Needle Scratches Only Through The Etching Ground And Exposes The Surface Of The Plate; The Latter Is Then Placed In ...

Dry Quenching
Dry Quenching Is A Process Of Cooling A Hot Solid Sub Stance Without Using A Liquid In Direct Contact With The Substance To Be Quenched. The Sensible Heat In Most Of The Cases Can Thereby Economically Be Converted Into Useful Energy And The Quality Of The Product Improved. This Process ...

Dry Rot
Dry Rot, A Term Applied To The Decay Of Wood Caused By Various Kinds Of Fungi. Frequently The Term Is Applied Solely To Such Decay As Takes Place In Timber That Has Been Worked Or Is In Actual Use : The Present Article Deals Solely With Dry Rot In This ...

Dry Tortugas
Dry Tortugas, A Group Of Io Coral Islets Or Keys 65 M. West Of Key West, Florida. The Largest Are East Key, Bird Key And Loggerhead. Fort Jefferson, The Site Of A Military Prison During The Civil War, Is A Quarantine Station. Loggerhead Has A Carnegie Laboratory Of Marine Biology. ...

Dryades
Dryades (dri'ad-ez) , Or Hamadryades, In Greek My Thology, Nymphs Of Trees And Woods. It Is Sometimes Said By Late Authors That A Dryad Is A Nymph Who Lives Among Trees (gr. Bpvs, Tree, Especially Oak), A Hamadryad The Spirit Of A Tree, Living And Dying With It. ...

Dryopithecus
Dryopithecus (dri-o-pith'e-kus), A Genus Of Fossil An Thropoids Which Inhabited Europe, North Africa And North India In The Miocene. Seven Species Have Been Described And These, With Four Allied Genera From The Siwalik Formation Of India, Are Be Lieved To Represent The Ancestral Stock Of The Anthropoids. See C. F. ...

Dual Organization
Dual Organization. A Distinctive Feature In The Social Structure Of Certain Simple Communities Is Their Division Into Two Complementary Sections Which Have Important Functions In The Social And Ceremonial Life Of The People. This System Of Dual Organization Occurs Most Typically In Many Parts Of Australia, Melanesia And N. America, ...

Dualism
Dualism. In Metaphysics, Dualism Postulates The Eter Nal Coexistence Of Mind And Matter, As Opposed To Monism Both Idealistic And Materialistic. Two Forms Of This Dualism Are Held. It Is Said That (i) Mind And Matter Are Absolutely Heterogeneous, Thus Making Any Causal Relation Between Them Ex Jiypothesi Im Possible, ...

Duality
Duality. A Statement Ca Pable Of Two Different Meanings, Both Of Them True, One Obtained From The Other, By Simply Inter Changing Two Words, Is An Illus Tration Of The Principle Of Duality. An Important Application Of The Principle Is Found In Projective Geometry. In The Plane This Is Accomplished ...

Dualla
Dualla, One Of The Principal Negro Peoples Of Cameroon Estuary, West Africa. (see Cameroons.) ...

Duars
Duars, A Tract Of Country In North-east India Consisting Of The Western And The Eastern Duars, Both Of Which Belonged To Bhutan Prior To The Bhutan War Of 1864-65; As A Result Of This They Passed Into Possession Of The British, When The Eastern Duars Were Assigned To Assam And ...

Dubawnt Or Doobaunt
Dubawnt Or Doobaunt (indian Toobaung, I.e., Turbid), A River Of Mackenzie And Keewatin Districts, Canada. It Rises In Wholdaia (or Daly) Lake, In 104 20' W. And 6o 15' N., And Flows Northward To Its Confluence With The Thelon River, And Thence Eastward To Chesterfield Inlet, An Arm Of Hudson ...

Dubbo
Dubbo, A Municipal Town Of Lincoln County, New South Wales, Australia, On The Macquarie River, A Flourishing Manufac Turing Town In A Pastoral District With Coal And Copper In The Neighbourhood. ...

Dublin
Dublin, A County Of Ireland, In The Province Of Leinster, Bounded North By Co. Meath, East By The Irish Sea, South By Wicklow, And West By Kildare And Meath. The Area Is 218,873 Ac. And The Population (1926) 189,248, Apart From Dublin City. Of The Population Over 7o% Are Roman ...

Dublin_2
Dublin, County Borough And Seaport, And The Metropolis Of The Irish Free State. It Lies At The Head Of A Bay Of The Irish Sea, To Which It Gives Name, About Midway On The Eastern Coast Of The Island, And 7o M. W. Of Holyhead. The Gaelic Name, Baile Atha ...

Dublin_3
Dublin, A City Of Georgia, U.s.a., On The Oconee River, 125m. S.e. Of Atlanta; The County Seat Of Laurens County. It Is On Federal Highway 8o, And Is Served By The Central Of Georgia, The Macon, Dublin And Savannah And The Wrightsville And Ten Nill Railways. The Population Was 7,707 ...

Dubois
Dubois, A City Of Clearfield County, Pa., U.s.a., On Sandy Lick Creek, 85m. N.e. Of Pittsburgh. It Is On Federal Highways 119, 219 And 322, And Is Served By The Buffalo, Rochester And Pittsburgh, The Buffalo And Susquehanna And The Pennsylvania Railways. The Population In 192o Was 13,681; 193o It ...

Dubrovnik
Dubrovnik (ital. Ragusa), A Port Of Dalmatia, Yugo Slavia, On The Adriatic Sea. Pop. (1931) 18,767. It Is By Far The Most Picturesque City On The Dalmatian Coast, Occupying A Prom Ontory Jutting Out Into The Sea Under The Bare Limestone Mass Of Mt. Sergio. The Seaward Fortifications Rise Directly ...

Dubuque
Dubuque, A City Of Iowa, U.s.a., On The Mississippi River, Opposite The Boundary Line Between Wisconsin And Illinois ; A Port Of Entry And The County Seat Of Dubuque County. It Is Served By The Burlington, The Chicago Great Western, The Chicago, Milwau Kee, St. Paul And Pacific And The ...

Ducas
Ducas (15th Cent.), Byzantine Historian, Flourished Under Constantine Xiii. (xi.) Dragases, The Last Emperor Of The East, About 145o. The Dates Of His Birth And Death Are Unknown. He Was The Grandson Of Michael Ducas (see Above). After The Fall Of Constantinople, He Was Employed In Various Diplomatic Missions By ...

Ducat
Ducat (duk'at), A Coin, Generally Of Gold, And Of Vary Ing Value, Formerly In Use In Many European Countries. It Was First Struck By Roger Ii. Of Sicily As Duke Of Apulia, And Bore An Inscriptiott "sit Tibi, Cliriste, Datus, Quem To Regis, Iste Ducatus" (lord, Thou Rulest This Duchy, ...

Duccio Di Buoninsegna
Duccio Di Buoninsegna (c. Italian Painter Of The Sienese School. His Father's Name Was Buoninsegna. We Learn Some Facts Regarding Duccio's Work From The Records Of The Exchequer Of The City Of Siena (libri D'entrata E Uscita Of The Biccherna). In 1278 He Was Employed As A Painter By The ...

Duchcov
Duchcov, A Town Of Bohemia, Czechoslovakia, Situated In The Fertile. Ohre Valley Near The Centre Of The Most-teplice Lignite Field. It Has Flourishing Glass And Ceramic Industries Using Local Raw Materials. Pop. (193o) 12,877, 5o% German. ...

Duchesne
Duchesne (latinized Duchenius, Querneus, Or Quer Cetanus), Andre (1 584-164o), French Geographer And Histo Rian, Generally Styled The Father Of French History. Through The Influence Of Richelieu, He Was Appointed Historiographer And Geog Rapher To The King. He Died In Paris On May 3o, 164o. Duchesne Left Behind Him More ...

Duck
Duck, The English Name For Birds Forming Five Of The Eleven Sub-families Of The Family Anatidae. Technically, Duck Is Re Stricted To The Female, The Male Being Called "drake," And, In One Species, "mallard." Ducks Comprise: (1) The Anatinae Or Fresh-water Ducks; (2) The Fuligulinae Or Sea-ducks (see Eider; Pochard ...

Ducking
Ducking And Cucking Stools, Chairs Used For The Punishment Of Scolds, Witches And Prostitutes In Bygone Days. The Two Have Been Confused, But Are Distinct. The Earlier, The Cucking-stool Or Stool Of Repentance, Is Of Very Ancient Date, And Was Used By The Saxons, Who Called It The Scealding Or ...

Duckweed
Duckweed, The Common Botanical Name For Species Of Lemna (family Lemnaceae) Which Form A Green Coating On Fresh Water Ponds And Ditches. The Plants Are Of Extremely Simple Structure And Are The Smallest And Least Differentiated Of Flowering Plants. They Consist Of A So Called "frond"a Flattened Green More Or ...

Duck_2
Duck, A Plain Fabric, Made Originally From Tow Yarns. The Cloth Is Lighter Than Canvas Or Sailcloth, And Differs From These In That It Is Almost Invariably Single In Both Warp And Weft. The Term Is Also Used To Indicate The Colour Obtained At A Certain Stage In The Bleaching ...

Ductless Glands
Ductless Glands, In Anatomy, Glands In The Body Having No Ducts Or Canals For Conveying Away Their Products, Which, Known As Internal Secretions, Pass Directly Into The Veins Or Lymphatics. Among These Structures Are The Spleen, Adrenals, Thyroid Gland, Parathyroids, Thymus And The Carotid And Coccygeal Bodies. In Addition Lymphatic ...

Duderstadt
Duderstadt, Town, Prussian Province Of Hanover, Ger Many, Situated In A Beautiful And Fertile Valley (formerly Called Goldene Mark) Watered By The Hahle, And On The Railway Wulften Leinefelde. Pop. Duderstadt Was Founded By Henry I. (the Fowler) In 929, Passed Later To The Monastery Of Quedlinburg, And Then To ...

Dudley Carleton Dorchester
Dorchester, Dudley Carleton, Viscount (1573-1632), English Diplomatist, Son Of Antony Carleton Of Baldwin Brightwell, Oxfordshire, Was Born On March 1o, 1573, And Educated At Westminster School And Christ Church, Oxford, Where He Graduated M.a. In 1600. As Secretary To The Earl Of Northum Berland His Name Was Associated With The ...

Dudley
Dudley, Market Town, County And Parliamentary Borough, Worcestershire, England, In A Portion Of That County Enclaved In Staffordshire, 8 M. N.w. Of Birmingham And 121 M. N.w. Of London By The L.m.s. Railway. The G.w. Railway Also Serves The Town. Dudley Stands On A Ridge In The Black Country, In ...

Dudo Or Dudon
Dudo Or Dudon (fl. C. I000), Norman Historian, Was Dean Of St. Quentin, Where He Was Born About 965. Sent In 986 By Albert I. Count Of Vermandois, On An Errand To Richard I., Duke Of Normandy, He Spent Some Years In That Country. During A Second Stay In Normandy ...

Dudweiler
Dudweiler, A Town Of The Saar District Of Administra Tion, On The Sulzbach, 4 M. By Rail N.e. From Saarbrucken. It Has Extensive Coal Mines And Ironworks And Produces Fireproof Bricks. Pop. (1925) ...

Duel
Duel. A Prearranged Encounter Between Two Persons, With Deadly Weapons, In Accordance With Conventional Rules, With The Object Of Voiding A Personal Quarrel Or Of Deciding A Point Of Honour. The First Recorded Instance Of The Word Occurs In Coryate's Crudities (i61 1), But Shakespeare Has Duello In This Sense, ...

Duenna
Duenna, Specifically The Chief Lady-in-waiting Upon The Queen Of Spain (span. A Married Lady Or Mistress, Lat. Doming). The Word Is More Widely Applied, However, To An Elderly Lady In Spanish And Portuguese Households (holding A Position Midway Between A Governess And Companion) Appointed To Take Charge Of The Young ...

Dueppel
Dueppel, A Village Of Germany, In The Prussian Province Of Schleswig-holstein, Opposite The Town Of Sonderburg (on The Island Of Alsen). (pop. 600.) The Position Of Duppel, Forming As It Does A Bridge-head For The Defenders Of The Island Of Alsen, Played A Conspicuous Part In The Wars Between Denmark ...

Duet
Duet, A Term In Music For A Composition For Two Perform Ers, Either Vocal Or Instrumental, In Which The Two Parts Are Of More Or Less Equal Importance. Thus A Piece For A Violin And Piano In Which The Latter Provides Merely An Accompaniment Is Not Properly Called A Duet. ...

Dufftown
Dufftown, Police Burgh, Banffshire, Scotland, On The Fiddich, 64 M. W.n.w. Of Aberdeen By The L.n.e.r. Pop. It Dates From 1817 And Bears The Name Of Its Founder, James Duff, 4th Earl Of Fife. Although Planned In The Shape Of A Cross, With A Square And Tower In The Middle, ...

Dug Out
Dug-out, An Underground Chamber Or Passage Dug Out Of A Slope Or Bank Or In A Trench. The Simplest Form Of Dug-out Is The Small Shelter For Two Or Three Men, Protecting Them Rather Against The Elements Than Against The Effects Of Enemy Fire ; Larger And More Elaborate Dug-outs ...

Dugong
Dugong, One Of The Two Existing Genera Of The Sirenia, Or Herbivorous Aquatic Mammals. Dugongs (halicore) Are Dis Tinguished From Manatee By The Presence In The Upper Jaw Of The Male Of A Pair Of Large Tusks. There Are Never More Than Five Molar Teeth On Each Side Of Either ...

Duiker Or Duikerbok
Duiker Or Duikerbok, A Small South African Antelope, Cephalophus Grimmi; The Popular Name Alluding To Its Habit Of Diving Into And Threading Its Way Through Thick Bush. The Genus Cephalophus, Together With Two Other African Genera, Guavei And Sylvicapra, Constitutes The Sub-family Cephalophinae. Duikers Are Animals Of Small Or Medium ...

Duilius
Duilius (or Duellius), Gaius, Roman General During The First Carthaginian War. In 260 B.c., When Consul In Command Of The Land Forces In Sicily, He Was Appointed To Supersede His Colleague Cn. Cornelius Scipio Asina, As Commander Of The Fleet. Recognizing That For The Unskilled Romans The Only Chance Of ...

Duisburg
Duisburg, A Town In The Prussian Government District (regierungsbezirk) Of Dusseldorf, Germany. It Is Situated At The Junction Of The Rhine And The Ruhr, 15 M. N. (by Rail) Of Dils Seldorf. . Pop. (1885) 5) 274,199. Duisburg Was Known To The Romans As Castrum Deutonis And Under The Frank ...

Duk Duk
Duk-duk, A Secret Society Of The New Britain Archipelago North-east Of New Guinea, In The South Pacific. The Society Has Religious And Political As Well As Social Objects. See "duk-duk And Other Customs Or Forms Of Expression Of The Melanesian's Intellectual Life," By Graf Von Pfeil (journ. Of Anthrop. Instit. ...

Dukas Or Doukas Ducas
Ducas, Dukas Or Doukas, The Name Of A Byzantine Family Which Supplied Several Rulers To The Eastern Empire. The Family First Came Into Prominence During The 9th Century, But Was Ruined When Constantine Ducas, A Son Of The General Androni Cus Ducas, Lost His Life In His Effort To Obtain ...

Duke Of Exeters Daughter
Duke Of Exeter's Daughter, A In Strument Of Torture Resembling The Rack. (see Torture.) ...

Duke University
Duke University At Durham, North Carolina, U.s.a., Owes Its Existence To A Trust Established By James B. Duke Dec. Ii, 1924 (see Duke Endowment). The University Is Being Built Around Trinity College, Founded 1838. From 1910 To 1925 The College Grew In Endowment And Value Of Property From $1,221,382 To ...

Duke
Duke, The Title Of One Of The Higher Orders Of The European Nobility, And Of Some Minor Sovereign Princes. The Word "duke," Which Is Derived From The Lat. Dux, A Leader, Or General, Originally Signified A Leader, And More Especially A Military Chief. In This General Sense The Word Survived ...

Dukinfield
Dukinfield, Municipal Borough, Parliamentary Division Of Stalybridge And Hyde, Cheshire, England, 6 M. East Of Man Chester. Pop. (1931), 19,309. It Lies In A Densely Populated Dis Trict And Is Served By The L.m.s. And L.n.e. Railways. The Chief Industries Include Coal-mining, Cotton Manufactures, Calico-print Ing, Hat-making, Iron-founding, Engineering And ...

Dulcigno
Dulcigno, A Seaport Of Montenegro, Yugoslavia, On The Adriatic Sea. Pop. (1921) 3,074, Chiefly Albanians And Turks. Shut In By Hills And Forests, Dulcigno Is The Prettiest Of Monte Negrin Towns. The Old Quarter, Built On A Promontory, Is Walled And Has A Mediaeval Castle. There Is A Roman Catholic ...

Dulcimer
Dulcimer, The Prototype Of The Pianoforte (q.v.), An In Strument Of Great Antiquity Derived Originally From The East, Consisting Of A Horizontal Sound-chest Over Which Are Stretched A Varying Number Of Wire Strings Set In Vibration By Strokes Of Little Sticks Or Hammers. The Dulcimer Differed From The Psal Terium ...

Dulken
Dulken, Town, Prussian Rhine Province, Germany, 1 I M. By Rail S.w. From Crefeld. Pop. (1933) 15,709. It Has A Gothic Parish Church. There Are Manufactures Of Linen, Cotton, Silk And Velvet, Etc., Ironworks And Foundries. ...

Dulse
Dulse, In Botany, Rhodymenia Palmata, One Of The Red Sea Weeds, Consisting Of Flat Solitary Or Tufted Purplish-red Fronds, Fan Shaped In General Outline And Divided Into. Numerous Segments, Which Are Often Again And Again Divided In A Forked Manner. It Varies Much In Size And Degree Of Branching, Ranging ...

Duluth
Duluth, A City Of Minnesota, U.s.a., On The Western Tip Of Lake Superior, At The Mouth Of The St. Louis River, Opposite Superior, Wis. ; The County Seat Of St. Louis County. It Is On Fed Eral Highways 2, I I, 53 And 61; And Is Served By The Chicago ...

Dulwich
Dulwich, A County And Parliamentary Division In The Metropolitan Borough Of Camberwell, London, England, With Stations At East, North And West Dulwich On The Southern Rail Way. Pop. (1931) 60,643. It Comprises The Southern End Of The Borough From Denmark Hill And Peckham To Upper Sydenham And The Crystal Palace. ...