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Encyclopedia Britannica

Volume 6, Part 2: Colebrooke to Damascius

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Cyanin
Cyanin Is The Pigment Of Cornflowers And Occurs Also In Deep Red Dahlias. (see Anthocyanins And Anthoxanthins.) ...

Cyanogen
Cyanogen, A Gas Composed Of Carbon And Nitrogen. The Name Was Suggested By Prussian Blue (gr. Kuanos, Blue), Its Earliest Known Compound. Cyanogen (c.2n2) Was First Isolated In 1815 By J. Gay-lussac, Who Obtained It By Heating Mercury Or Silver Cyanide ; This Discovery Is Of Considerable Historical Impor Tance, ...

Cyaxares
Cyaxares (si-aks'-ah-rez), King Of Media, Reigned, Ac Cording To Herodotus (i. 107), 40 Years, About 624-584 B.c. That He Was The Real Founder Of The Median Empire Is Proved By The Fact That In Darius's Time A Median Usurper, Fravartish, Pretended To Be His Offspring (behistun Inscr. 2. 43). Herodotus ...

Cybele
Cybele, A Goddess Native To Asia Minor, Known To The Romans Most Commonly As The Great Mother Of The Gods. (q.v.). ...

Cyclades
Cyclades, Islands In The Greek Archipelago, Around The Island Of Syra (syros), The Principal Town Of Which, Hermoupolis, Is The Capital Of A Department. The Islands Are Interesting And Picturesque; Their Inhabitants Present The Best Type Of Greek, And Many Islands Bear Traces Of The Feudal Rule Of Venetian Families. ...

Cyclamen
Cyclamen, In Botany, A Genus Belonging To The Family Primulaceae, Containing 18 Species Native In The Mountains Of Central Europe And The Mediterranean Region. C. Europaeum (sow-bread) Is Found As An Introduced Plant In Copses In Kent And Sussex. The Plants Are Low Growing Herbs With Large Tuberous Rootstocks, From ...

Cycle
Cycle, In Astronomy, A Period Of Time At The End Of Which Some Aspect Or Relation Of The Heavenly Bodies Recurs. (gr. Rijicaos, A Circle.) (see Calendar And Eclipse.) In Physics, The Term Is Applied To A Series Of Operations Which, Performed Upon A System, Brings It Back To Its ...

Cycling
Cycling, The Clipped Term Now Given Comprehensively To The Sport Or Exercise Of Riding A Bicycle (q.v.) Or Tricycle (q.v.). History.—suggestions Of Vehicles Having Two Or More Wheels And Propelled By The Muscular Effort Of The Rider Or Riders Are To Be Found In Very Early Times, Even On The ...

Cyclometer
Cyclometer, An Instrument Used Especially By Cyclists To Determine The Distance They Have Traversed (gr. Ki Circle, And Js Rpov, Measure). In A Common Form A Stud Attached To One Spoke Of The Wheel Engages With A Toothed Pinion And Moves It On One Tooth At Each Revolution. The Pinion ...

Cyclone
Cyclone. The Word Was First Coined By H. Piddington In The Sailors' Horn-book (1855) For Tropical Revolving Storms, To Indicate The Combined Circular And Centripetal Movement, Which Was Once Thought To Be Characteristic Of All Central Systems Of Low Pressure. (gr. Kukawp, Whirling, From K(.kxos, The Coil Of A Snake.) ...

Cyclopean Masonry
Cyclopean Masonry, A Term In Architecture, Used In Conjunction With Pelasgic, To Define The Rude Polygonal Masonry Employed By The Greeks, The Etruscans And Other Primitive Peoples (from The Cyclopes, The Supposed Builders Of The Walls Of Mycenae). In The Earliest Examples It Consists Only Of Huge Masses Of Rock, ...

Cyclopes
Cyclopes. (1) In Homer The Cyclopes Are One-eyed Can Nibal Giants (kukxwili, Round-eye), Living A Rude Pastoral Life In A Distant Land (traditionally Identified With Sicily), Having No Social Unit Larger Than The Family (see Acis; Polyphemus). (2) In Hesiod They Are Sons Of Heaven And Earth, Three In Number ...

Cyclostomata Or Marsipobranchii
Cyclostomata Or Marsipobranchii, A Group Of Vertebrate Animals That Includes The Lampreys And Hagfishes; Formerly These Were Placed Among The Fishes, But Are Now Generally Regarded As Forming A Class Apart. The Cyclostomata Are Naked, Eel-shaped Animals, Without Paired Fins; The Mouth Is Not Pro Vided With Jaws, But There ...

Cyclostyle
Cyclostyle, In Architecture, A Term Applied To A Struc Ture Consisting Of A Simple Ring Of Columns With Or Without A Roof, But With No Interior Walls Or Divisions. The Name Is Also Applied To An Apparatus For Producing A Number Of Copies Of Letters Or Docu Ments, Either Written ...

Cygnus
Cygnus ("the Swan"), In Astronomy, A Constellation Of The Northern Hemisphere Fabled By The Greeks To Be The Swan In The Form Of Which Zeus Seduced Leda. In This Constellation 13 Cygni Is A Fine Coloured Double Star, Consisting Of A Yellow Star, 3 Mag., And A Blue Star, 51 ...

Cylinder In Engineering
Cylinder In Engineering The Cylinder Is One Of The Primary Mechanical Elements Used In Numerous Kinds Of Prime Movers, Compressors, Pumps, And Pneumatic And Hydraulic Appliances. The Earliest Cylinders Were Employed In What Were Termed Fire-engines, Which Operated By The Production Of A Partial Vacuum Beneath A Piston. Huygens In ...

Cylinder
Cylinder. In Its Oldest Mathematical Sense, The Space Swept Out By A Rectangle (fig. I) Rotating Round One Side As Axis. It Is From The Greek Kylindros, Roller, From Kylindein, To Roll. The Side (called Generatrix, G) Parallel To The Axis (a) Traces The Curved Cylindric Surface; The Other Two ...

Cyllene I
Cyllene (i) A Mountain In Greece, In The North-east Of Arcadia, Mod. Ziria, 7,789 Ft. It Was Sacred To Hermes, Who Was Born In A Cave On The Mountain, And Had A Temple And An Ancient Statue On Its Summit. (2) An Ancient Port In Elis Doubtfully Identified With (3) ...

Cyma
Cyma, In Architecture, A Moulding Of Double Curvature, Whose Profile Is Concave At One End, Convex At The Other. When The More Projecting Portion Is Concave, It Is Known As A Cyma Recta, When Convex As A Cyma Reversa. (gr. Kuma, Wave.) (see Moulding.) ...

Cymatium
Cymatium, The Uppermost Member Of A Classic Cornice (q.v.), Usually Consisting Of A Projecting Moulding. In The Greek Doric The Cymatium Occurs Only Upon The Pediment Cornices, Returning Along The Sides Only The Depth Of The Pediment Coping Which It Decorates. It Is In The Form Of An Ovolo Or ...

Cymbals
Cymbals, A Modern Instrument Of Percussion Of Indefinite Musical Pitch, Whereas The Small Ancient Cup-shaped Cymbals Sounded A Definite Note. Cymbals Consist Of Two Thin Round Plates Of An Ally Containing Eight Parts Of Copper To Two Of Tin, And The Sound Is Obtained By Clashing And Rubbing Them Against ...

Cyme
Cyme, The Name Given In Botany To An Arrangement Of Flowers (inflorescence) In Which Each Successive Branch Of The Flowering Axis Ends In A Flower After Bearing One Or More Bracteoles In Whose Axils The Branching Is Continuous. Cymes Are Subdivided Accord Ing To The Number Of These Branches. (see ...

Cynegils
Cynegils (d. 643), King Of The West Saxons, Succeeded His Uncle King Ceolwulf In 611. With His Son Cwichelm (d. 636), He Defeated The Advancing Britons At Bampton, Oxfordshire, In 614, And Cwichelm Sought To Arrest The Growing Power Of The North Umbrian King Eadwine By Procuring His Assassination ; ...

Cynewulf
Cynewulf (d. 785), King Of Wessex, Succeeded To The Throne In 757 On The Deposition Of Sigebert. He Was Constantly At War With The Welsh. In 779 Offa Of Mercia Defeated Him And Took Bensington. In 785 He Was Surprised And Killed At Marten, Wilts (merantune), By Cyneheard, Brother Of ...

Cynewulf_2
Cynewulf, The Only Old English Vernacular Poet, Known By Name, Of Whom Any Undisputed Writings Are Extant. He Is The Author Of Four Poems Preserved In Two Mss., The Exeter Book And The Vercelli Book, Both Of The Early 11th Century. An Epilogue To Each Poem Contains The Runic Characters ...

Cynics
Cynics, A Small But Influential School Of Ancient Philosophers. Their Name Is Variously Derived From The Building In Athens Called Cynosarges, The Earliest Home Of The School, And From The Greek Word For A Dog (kbow), In Contemptuous Allusion To The Uncouth And Aggressive Manners Adopted By The Members Of ...

Cynosure
Cynosure, The Name Given By The Greeks And Romans To The Constellation Of The Little Bear, Ursa Minor. (lat. Cynosura, Gr. Kvvovovpa, From Kvvos, Genitive Of Kbwv, A Dog, And Obpa Tail.) The Word Is Applied In English To The Pole-star Which Appears In That Constellation, And Hence To Something ...

Cynotherapy
Cynotherapy, The Practice Of Healing By Means Of Dogs, Is Of Great Antiquity And Almost World-wide Distribution. In It The Use Of The Dog May Be Merely Magical Or Ceremonial, Or The Parts Of The Dog Itself May Be Used As Medicine Or As Ingredients Therein. Primitive Thought Does Not ...

Cyperaceae
Cyperaceae, In Botany, A Family Of Monocotyledons. They Are Grass-like Herbs, Some Times Annual, But More Often Per Sisting By Means Of An Under Ground Stem, From Which Spring Erect Solitary Or Clustered, Gen Erally Three-sided Aerial Stems, With Leaves In Three Rows. The Minute Flowers Are Arranged In Spikelets ...

Cypress
Cypress (cupressus), In Botany, A Genus Of 12 Species Of Conifers Belonging To The Family Cupressaceae, Represented By Evergreen Aromatic Trees And Shrubs Indigenous To The South Of Europe, Asia And North America. The Leaves Of The Cypresses Are Scale-like, Overlapping And Generally In Four Rows; The Female Cat Kins ...

Cyprinodonts
Cyprinodonts, A Family Of Fishes, Soft-rayed And With Abdominal Pelvic Fins, But Without A Duct To The Air-bladder. The Head Is Flat-topped, The Mouth Generally Small And Protractile, With Bands Of Small Teeth In The Jaws, The Scales Usually Large. About 40o Species Are Known, None Of Which Exceeds A ...

Cyprus
Cyprus, One Of The Largest Islands In The Mediterranean, Since 1914 A British Crown Colony, At Roughly Equal Distance From The Coasts Of Asia Minor To The North And Of Syria To The East. The Headland Of Cape Kormakiti In Cyprus Is Distant 44 M. From Cape Anamur In Asia ...

Cypselus
Cypselus, _tyrant Of Corinth From C. 657 To 627 B.c. Was The Son Of Aeetion And Labda, Daughter Of Amphion, A Member Of The Ruling Family, The Bacchiadae. He Is Said To Have Derived His Name From The Fact That When The Bacchiadae, Warned That He Would Prove Their Ruin, ...

Cyrenaica
Cyrenaica, In Ancient Geography, A District Of The North African Coast, Lying Between The Syrtis Major And Marmarica. The Northern Half Of The District Was Known As Pentapolis, From Its Possession Of Five Considerable Cities (i) Hesperides-berenice (bengasi), (2) Barca (merj), (3) Cyrene (ain Shahat-grenna), (4) Apollonia (marsa Susa), (5) ...

Cyrenaics
Cyrenaics, A Greek School Of Philosophy, So Called From Cyrene, The Birthplace Of The Founder, Aristippus (q.v). It Was One Of The Two Earliest Socratic Schools, And Emphasized One Side Only Of The Socratic Teaching (cf. Cynics). Socrates, Although He Held That Virtue Was The Only Human Good, Admitted To ...

Cyrene
Cyrene, The Original Capital Of Ancient Cyrenaica (q.v.), And One Of The Greatest Of Greek Colonies. The Theraean Story Of Its Foundation, As Told By Herodotus, Runs Thus : Battus Was Bidden By The Delphic Oracle To Lead A Portion Of The Citizens To Libya And Build A City In ...

Cyril
Cyril (827-869), Apostle Of The Slays, Amongst Whom He Worked In Conjunction With His Elder Brother Methodius (q.v.). Tradition Says That While In The Khazar Country (where He Com Bated Jewish And Mohammedan Influence) He Found At Kherson The Remains Of Clement Of Rome, Which He Bore With Him Wher ...

Cyrillic
Cyrillic, The Alphabet Used By The Orthodox Slays. For An Account Of Its Origin And Development, See Alphabet, Old Sla Vonic, Slavonic Languages, Slavs. ...

Cyrillus
Cyrillus, Greek Jurist Of The 5th Century, Was Professor In The Ancient Law College Of Berytus, And One Of The Founders Of The Oecumenical School Of Jurists (tils Oucouµ€vrk &8itcncaxoi ) Which Preceded The Succession Of Anastasius To The Eastern Em Pire (a.d. 491), And Paved The Way For Justinian's ...

Cyrto Style
Cyrto-style, In Architecture, A Semi-circular Projecting Portico With Columns. ...

Cyrus Edwin Dallin
Dallin, Cyrus Edwin ), American Sculp Tor, Was Born At Springville (utah) , On Nov. 22, 1861. He Was A Pupil Of Truman H. Bart'ett In Boston, Of The Icole Des Beaux Arts, The Academie Julien And The Sculptors Henri M. Chapu And Jean Dampt (b. 1858), In Paris, And ...

Cyrus
Cyrus, The Latinized Form Of A Persian Name Borne By Two Prominent Members Of The Achaemenid House (gr. Kupos; Pers. Kuru-sh; Babyl. Kurash; Hebr. Koresh). I. Cyrus The Great, The Founder Of The Persian Empire, Was The Son Of Cambyses I. Of The Clan Of The Achaemenidae, The Principal Clan ...

Cystine
Cystine Is One Of Some Twenty Substances (amino-acids) Which Are Produced When The Proteins Of Food Are Digested In The Alimentary Canal. Together With Its Congeners It Is Liberated From Proteins By Any Process Which Involves Hydrolysis, And It Is Ob Tained When Any Typical Protein Is Boiled With Mineral ...

Cystolith
Cystolith, A Botanical Term For The Inorganic Concretions, Of Calcium Carbonate, Formed In A Cellulose Matrix In Special Cells, Generally In The Leaf Of Plants Of Certain Families, E.g., Ficus Elastica, The India-rubber Plant. ...

Cythera
Cythera, An Island (mod. Cerigo, But Officially Cythera), Situated About 8 M. From Cape Malea, The Southern Promontory Of Greece. From North To South It Is Nearly 20 M. Long And Its Greatest Breadth Is About 12 M. It Is Rocky, But Streams Abound, And There Are Fertile Districts. Two ...

Cytisine
Cytisine, An Alkaloid Discovered In 1818 By J. B. Chevreul In The Seeds Of Laburnum (cytisus Laburnum) And Isolated By A. Husemann And W. Marme In 1865. Cytisine (ulexin, Sophorin), Is Also Found In The Seeds Of Furze (ulex Europaeus), Sophora Tormentosa, And Euchresta Horsfieldii. It Is Extracted From The ...

Cytology Of Plants
Cytology Of Plants : See, In Addition To General Article Cytology, The Section Plant Cytology Of Plants. ...

Cytology
Cytology Is The Term Applied To The Study Of Those Micro Scopic Units Of The Bodies Of Animals And Plants, Known As Cells. To Obtain A Clear Idea Of The Nature Of Cells A Brief Consideration Of The Fundamental Character Of The Reproductive Processes Of Animals And Plants Will Greatly ...

Cytoplasm
Cytoplasm The Cell Consists Of Two Parts, Nucleus And Cytoplasm. The Former Contains The Chromosomes, Which Are The Physical Basis Of Heredity, And Which Probably Bear Most Of The Factors Of Inheri Tance. Outside The Nucleus Is The Body Of The Cell, Formed Of Protoplasm. Floating In This Semi-viscid Protoplasm ...

Cytoplasm_2
Cytoplasm, The Term Used In Biology To Denote All The Living Contents Of The Cell (protoplasm) Other Than The Nucleus (q.v.). (see Cytology, Protoplasm, Cell.) ...

Cyzicenus
Cyzicenus, An Architectural Term Used By Vitruvius For Certain Large Halls, Facing North, In Greek Houses. Such Halls Usually Overlooked Gardens And Had Large, Low Windows In Order To Give The Widest Possible View. ...

Cyzicus
Cyzicus, An Ancient Town Of Mysia In Asia Minor, Situated On The Shoreward Side Of Arctonnesus, Which Is Said To Have Been Originally An Island In The Sea Of Marmora, And To Have Been Artificially Connected With The Mainland In Historic Times. It Was, According To Tradition, Occupied By Thessalian ...

Czech Language And Literature
Czech Language And Literature. The Name Czech Has Always Been Used By The Slays Themselves And By Their Eastern Neighbours. In Western Countries Derivations Of The Latin Name Of Their Chief Land, Bohemia (cechy), Were In Use Until Recently. To Avoid Associations With "bohemianism" The Native Form Czech And, Since ...

Czech
Czech (ech), A Name Signifying An Inhabitant Of "cechy," The Native Name For Bohemia, But In Use Confined To The Native Slavonic Inhabitants Of That Country And Of Moravia. The Czechs, With The Lusatians, Poles And Slovaks, Form The West Ern Group Of The Slav Family; For Their Ethnographical Position ...

Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakia Was An Independent Republic In Cen Tral Europe, Proclaimed On Oct. 28, 1918, And Confirmed By The Peace Treaties After The World War. It Comprised The Lands Of The Ancient Kingdom Of Bohemia (q.v.), Slovakia (q.v.) And The Autonomous Territory Of Ruthenia (q.v.). After Having Been De Prived Of ...

Czenstochowa
Czenstochowa, A Town Of Poland, In The Province Of Kielce, On The Left Bank Of The Warta, 143m. S.w. Of Warsaw, On The Railway Between That City And Cracow. Pop. (1900) 53,65o; (1931) 117,588. Here Is A Celebrated Monastery Crowning The Steep Eminence Called Jasna Gora. It Was Founded By ...

Czernowitz
Czernowitz (rum. Cernauti), A City Of Rumania, Capital Of The Bukovina (q.v.), And Situated On The Main Lemberg-bu Charest Railway. Pop. (1930) 111,122. The Trading Circles Are Exclusively Jewish, The Peasants Ruthenian, The Official Circles Rumanian, And There Is Also A German Colony. Czernowitz Lies On An Eminence On The ...

Dab
Dab (limanda Limanda), A Species Of Flat-fish Belonging To The Family Pleuronectidae And Distinguishable From Plaice And Flounder By The Distinct Arch In The Lateral Line At The Anterior End. It Is Of A Brown Or Ashen Grey Colour With Irregular Dark Markings And Close Set Scales, And Is To ...

Dabchick
Dabchick, The Popular Name Of The Little Grebe (podicipes Fluviatilis) A Member Of The Family Colymbidae. The Dabchick Has A Wide Range In The Old World And In Great Britain Is Partially Migratory. The Frosts Of Winter Drive It From Ponds And Rivers To The Tidal Estuaries. See Grebe. D'abernon, ...

Dacca
Dacca, A City Of British India, Giving Its Name To A District And Division Of Bengal Situated On The Buri-ganga River With A Railway Station, 10 M. From The Terminus Of The River Steamers At Narayanganj. Pop. (1931) 138,518. Dacca Has Twice Been A Provincial Capital. In 1608 Islam Khan, ...

Dacia
Dacia, A Large District Of Central Europe, Bounded On The North By The Carpathians, On The South By The Danube, On The West By The Pathissus (theiss) And On The East By The Tyras (dniester), Thus Corresponding In The Main To The Modern Rumania And Transylvania. The Inhabitants Of This ...

Dacite
Dacite (from Dacia, Mod. Transylvania), In Petrology, Volcanic Rocks Which May Be Considered A Quartz-bearing Variety Of Andesite. Like The Latter They Consist For The Most Part Of Plagioclase Felspar With Biotite, Hornblende, Augite Or Enstatite, And Have Generally A Porphyritic Structure, But They Contain Also Quartz As Rounded, Corroded ...

Dacoit
Dacoit, A Term Used In India For A Robber Belonging To An Armed Gang. The Word Is Derived From The Hindustani Dakait, And Being Current In Bengal Got Into The Indian Penal Code. By Law, To Constitute Dacoity, There Must Be Five Or More In The Gang Committing The Crime. ...

Dactyl
Dactyl, In Prosody, A Long Syllable Followed By Two Short (gr. "a Finger"). (see Verse.) ...

Dado
Dado, A Decorative Band Running Horizontally Along The Lower Portion Of A Wall Above The Base; A Wainscot That Does Not Cover The Entire Height Of The Wall. The Dado Is Frequently Separated From The Rest Of The Wall By A Moulding Known As A Chair Rail Or Surbase. ...

Dadu Panthis
Dadu Panthis. The Dadu Panthi Sect Of Western India (following Dadu's Path) Founded By Dadu About The Year 160o, Has Many Followers In Ajmir And Marwar, One Section Of Whom, The Nagas, Engage Largely In Military Service, While The Others Are Either Householders Or Mendicants. The Followers Of This Creed ...

Daedalus
Daedalus, A Mythical Greek Architect And Sculptor, Who Was Said To Have Built The Labyrinth For Minos Of Crete, To Have Made A Wooden Cow For Pasiphae And A Bronze Man Who Repelled The Argonauts. Falling Under The Displeasure Of Minos, He Fash Ioned Wings For Himself And His Son ...

Daffodil
Daffodil, The Common Name Of A Group Of Plants Of The Genus Narcissus, And Family Amaryllidaceae (see Narcissus) . The Common Daffodil, N. Pseudo-narcissus, Is Frequent In Woods And Thickets In Most Parts Of Northern Europe, But Is Rare In Scot Land. It Is Sparingly Naturalized In The Eastern United ...

Dafla Hills
Dafla Hills, A Tract Of Hilly Country On The Border Of Assam, Occupied By An Independent Tribe Called Dafla. It Forms Part Of The Sub-himalayan Hills To The North Of The Darrang And Lakhimpur Districts, And Is Bounded On The West By The Bhareli River And On The East By ...

Daft
Daft, A Municipality (with Administration Centre And 36 Barrios Or Districts) And Capital Of The Province Of Camarines Norte, Luzon, Philippine Islands, Situated In The North-east Part Of The Province Near The Coast. It Is The Chief Commercial Place In The Province And Does Most Of Its Business Direct With ...

Dafydd Ab Gwilym
Dafydd Ab Gwilym (i 4th Cent.) , Welsh Poet, A Con Temporary Of Chaucer, Was Born At Bro Gynin, Cardiganshire, About 134o, And Died About 1400. He Was Elected Chief Bard Of Glamorgan, And Was Household Bard To His Kinsman, Ivor Hael Of Maesaleg. After An Unsuccessful Attempt To Elope ...

Dagari
Dagari, A People Closely Related To The Oule, Living On The Middle Black Volta River (upper Volta And Gold Coast, Diebou Gou-lorha District) , And Speaking A Mossi Dialect. See Tauxier, Le Noir Du Soudan (1 A Z 2) . ...

Dagger
Dagger, A Hand Weapon With A Short Blade. The Derivation Is Obscure (cf. Fr. Dague And Ger. Degen), But The Word Is Related To Dag, A Long Pointed Jag Such As Would Be Made In Deeply Nicking The Edge Of A Garment. The War Knife In Various Forms And Under ...

Daghestan
Daghestan (dagestan), An Autonomous S.s.r. In The Russian Socialist Federal Soviet Republic. Area 55,272 Sq.km. Pop. (1926) 788,078, Urban 73,831, Rural 714,247. Its Boundaries Are :— North, The Autonomous Kalmuck Area, East, The Caspian Sea, South, The Azerbaijan S.s.r., West, The North Caucasian Area, The Chechen Autonomous Area, And The ...

Dago
Dago, A Name Given Somewhat Contemptuously To Spanish, Portuguese And Italian Sailors. In America The Word Is Generally Confined In Its Use To Designate The Poorer Class Of Italian Immi Grants. The Word Is Apparently A Corruption Of The Common Spanish And Portuguese Christian Name "diego." ...

Dagobert I
Dagobert I. (d. 639), King Of The Franks, Was The Son Of Clotaire Ii. In 623 His Father Established Him As King Of The Region East Of The Ardennes, And In 626 Revived For Him The Ancient Kingdom Of Austrasia, Minus Aquitaine And Provence. As Dagobert Was Yet But A ...

Dagomba
Dagomba, The Hausa Name Of The Dagbamba In The Da Gong District Of Tamale And Yendi In The Northern Parts Of The Gold Coast, Probably Parent Stock Of The Mossi, Having The Same Physical, Linguistic And Social Characters; Once A Powerful Kingdom Which In The I8th Century Fought Against The ...

Dagon
Dagon, A Native Semitic Deity, Adopted By The Philistines After Their Settlement In Canaan (judg. Xvi. 21, 23 ; I Sam. V. 1; Cf. Josh. Xv. 41, I Chron. X. 1 O, 1 Ma Cc. X. 83, 84, Xi. 4) . Identical With The Babylonian God Dagan. The Name Popularly ...

Dagupan
Dagupan, A Municipality (with Administration Centre And 25 Barrios Or Districts), And The Most Important Commercial Centre Of The Province Of Pangasinan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, On A Branch Of The Agno River Near Its Entrance Into The Gulf Of Lingayen, 125 M. By Rail N.n.w. Of Manila. Pop. (1918) 22,441, ...

Dahabeah
Dahabeah, An Arabic Word For A Passenger Boat Used By Natives On The Nile. The Typical Form Is That Of A Barge-like House-boat Provided With Sails, Resembling The Painted Galleys Represented On The Tombs Of The Pharaohs. Similar State Barges Were Used By The Mohammedan Rulers Of Egypt, And To ...

Dahlak Islands
Dahlak Islands, An Archipelago Consisting Of A Group Of Islands Off The Bay Of Massaawa Forming Part Of The Italian Colony Of Eritrea. They Are Chiefly Of Coral Formation, Three Islands Only Being Inhabited. A Trade In Pearl And Sponge Fishing Has Been Conducted Since Roman Times. See Also Eritrea. ...

Dahlia
Dahlia, A Genus Of Herbaceous Plants Of The Family Corn Positae (q.v.). The Genus Contains Ten Species Indigenous To The High Sandy Plains Of Mexico. The Dahlia Was First Introduced Into Britain From Spain In 1789 By The Marchioness Of Bute. The Species Was Probably D. Variabilis, Whence By Far ...

Dahomeen
Dahomeen, A People Living In Dahomey In The Abomey —allada—wida District Of Africa. The Hierarchical Monarchy For Merly Comprised King, Ministers And High Court Functionaries, An Organized Standing Army Comprising Several Regiments Including One Composed Of Women (amazons), With Distinct Social Ranks Of Princes, High Dignitaries, People And Slaves. The ...

Dahomey
Dahomey (fr. Dahomti), One Of The Colonies Of The Group Of French West Africa. Dahomey Is Bounded South By The Gulf Of Guinea, East By Nigeria (british), North By The Colonies On The Niger And Upper Volta, And On The North-west By The Togo, The Eastern Portion Of Which Was ...

Daille
Daille (dallaees), Jean French Prot Estant Divine, Was Born At Chatellerault And Educated At Poitiers And Saumur. In 1625 He Became Minister Of The Church Of Sau Mur, And In 1626 Of The Church Of Charenton. Of His Works The Best Known Is The Treatise Du Vrai Emploi Des Peres ...

Dairen Dalny
Dairen (dalny), The Port Of The Kwantung Peninsula, On The Pe-chih-li Strait, Which Is The Southern End Of The Liao Tung Peninsula, In Southern Manchuria. The Kwantung Penin Sula Is Held By Japan On A Lease, And Is Administered By A Governor-general Stationed At Dairen. The Territory Forms A Customs ...

Dairy Farming
Dairy Farming. History Reveals That Many Species Of Mammals Have Been Used As A Source Of Milk For Human Consump Tion. The Most Common References To Sources Other Than That Of The Human Mother Were To The Cow, Ewe, Goat, And The Mare. Today The Ewe And The Goat Are ...

Dairy Machinery And Equipment
Dairy Machinery And Equipment. The De Velopment Of Modern Dairy Machinery Has Been Influenced By Sev Eral Factors, A Few Of Which Are: (i) Expansion In The Use Of Dairy Products And Dairy By-products; (2) The Urge To Save Labour; (3 ) Development Of Large Volume Production And Distribution Agencies; ...

Dais
Dais, Originally The Raised Part Of The Floor At The End Of A Mediaeval Hall. On This The Lord Of The Mansion Dined With His Friends At The High Table, Apart From The Retainers And Servants. There Was Generally A Deep-re Cessed Bay Window At One Or At Each End ...

Daisy
Daisy, The Name Applied To The Plants Constituting The Genus Bellis, Of The Family Compositae. It Is Derived From The Anglo Saxon And Means Day's Eye. The Genus Contains Ten Species Found In Europe And The Mediterranean Region. The Common Daisy, B. Perennis, Is The Only Representa Tive Of The ...

Dakar
Dakar, A Seaport Of Senegal, And Capital Of French West Africa, In 14° 40' N., I 7 ° 24' W. The Town Holds A Commanding Position On The Route Between Western Europe And Brazil And South Africa, Being Situated In The Gulf Of Goree On The Eastern Side Of The ...

Dakota
Dakota, A Tribe, Or Confederated Aggregation Of Tribes, Of Siouan Family In The Northern Plains Of The United States. The Name, Now Applied To Two States, Means "allies"; The Popular Designation Is Sioux, Abbreviated From Nadowessioux, From Ojibwa Via French. As The Largest Group In The Siouan Family, The Dakota ...

Dalaguete
Dalaguete, A Municipality (with Administration Centre And 25 Barrios Or Districts) Of The Province And Island Of Cebu, Philippine Islands, At The Mouth Of The Tapon River On The East Coast, 50 M. S.s.w. Of Cebu, The Provincial Capital. Pop. (1918) 26,904, Of Whom Only One Was White. The Climate ...

Dalbeattie
Dalbeattie, Police Burgh, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland. Pop. (1931) 3,011. It Lies On Dalbeattie Burn, 141 M. S.w. Of Dumfries By The L.m.s.r. The Town Dates From 1780 And Owes Its Rise To The Granite Quarries At Craignair And Elsewhere In The Vicinity, From Which Was Derived Stone Used For The Thames ...

Dalberg
Dalberg, The Name Of An Ancient And Distinguished Ger Man Noble Family, Derived From The Hamlet And Castle (now In Ruins) Of Dalberg Or Dalburg Near Kreuznach. In 1494 The Ger Man King, Maximilian I., Granted The Dalbergs The Honour Of Being The First To Receive Knighthood At The Coronation, ...

Dalecarlia
Dalecarlia (dalarne, "the Dales"), A West Midland Region Of Sweden, Extending From The Mountains Of The Norwegian Frontier To Within 25 M. Of Gefle On The Baltic Coast. It Is A Region Of Historical Associations And Local Peculiarities. The Dale Carlians Or Dalesmen Have Their Own Dialect And Costumes. In ...

Dalkeith
Dalkeith, Municipal And Police Burgh, Burgh Of Barony And Parish, Edinburghshire, Scotland, Betweeil The North And South Esk, 7 M. S.e. Of Edinburgh, By The L.n.e.r. Pop. (1931) It Is An Important Agricultural Centre, And One Of The Largest Grain-markets In Scotland. Besides Milling And Brewing, The Chief Industries Are ...

Dalkey
Dalkey, A Small Port And Watering Place Of Co. Dublin, Ireland, 9 M. South-east Of Dublin By Rail. Pop. Of Urban District (5926), 4,135. It Is Situated On And About Sorrento Point, The Southern Horn Of Dublin Bay. The 15th Century Castle Has Been Restored For Use As Offices. There ...

Dallas
Dallas, The Largest City Of Northern Texas, U.s.a., On The Trinity River, 3om. E. Of Fort Worth And 75 M. From The Oklahoma State Line ; The County Seat Of Dallas County, A Port Of Entry In The Galveston Customs District And An Important Financial And Commercial Centre. It Is ...

Dalle
Dalle, A Rapid Falling Over Flat Smooth Rock Surfaces In A River Bed, Especially In Rivers Flowing Between Basaltic Rocks (fr. For A Flag-stone Or Flat Tile). The Name Is Common In North Amer Ica, And Came Into Use Through The French Employes Of The Hud Son's Bay Company. Well-known ...