Home >> Chamber's Encyclopedia, Volume 4 >> Abraham Cowley to Cobra Da Capello

Chamber's Encyclopedia, Volume 4

Abraham Cowley
Cowley, Abraham, Was B. In London In 1618. He Was The Son Of A Grocer, And Was Educated At Westminster School And Trinity College, Cambridge. According To His Own Statement, Lie Was Made A Poet By The Perusal Of Bpenser, Whose Works Were Wont To Lie In His Mother's Parlor. ...

Absconding Debtors
Debtors, Absconding. The Existing Laws For The Arrest Of Debtors Absconding From England Having Been Found Insufficient, In Consequence Of The Delay Which Was Occasioned In Obtaining The Necessary Process, The "act To Facilitate The More Speedy Arrest Of Absconding Debtors" (14 And 15 Vict. C. 52) Was Passed In ...

Adam George Czartorysici
Czartorysici, Adam George, Son Of Prince Adam Casimir C., Of An Ancient Polish House, Sometimes (but Wrongly) Said To Be Sprung From The Jagellons (q.v.), Was B. At Warsaw, 14th Jan.. 1770. Having Completed An Excellent Education At Edinburgh And London, He Returned To His Native Country, And Took Part ...

Alexander Cruden
Cru'den, Alexander, Was B. At Aberdeen, 31st May, 1700, And Educated At Maris Chal College, With A View To The Church, But Having Exhibited Decided Symptoms Of Insanity, He Was For Some (line Placed In Confinement. On His Release, He Left Aberdeen, And After Spending Several Years As A Tutor, ...

Alexander Dalrymple
Dalrymple, Alexander, F.r.b., F.s.a., Younger Brother Of The Preceding, Was B. At New Hailes, The Seat Of His Father, Near Edinburgh, 24th July, 1737. In 1752, He Obtained An Appointment In The East India Company's Service; But His Extreme Youth, As Well As The Imperfect Education He Had Received At ...

Alexandre Gabriel Decamps
Decamps, Alexandre-gabriel, A Celebrated French Painter, Was B. At Paris In 1803. He Was A Pupil Of 31. Abel De Pujol, The Well-known Historical Painter, But He Seems Not To Have Been Very Amenable To Tuition. He Was One Of Those Who Cannot Be Made To Imitate Approved Models, And ...

American Colleges
Colleges, American, Have Been Organized Mostly According To One General Plan. A Corporation, Acting Tinder A Charter Granted By The Legislature, Has Control Of The Property, Appoints The Instructors, Makes Laws For The Government Of The Institution, And Confers Degrees. In Some Colleges, The Trustees Fill The Vacancies Which Occur ...

American Declaration Of Independence
Declaration Of Independence, American, Agreed Upon July 4, 1776, By The Thirteen American Colonies Then In Revolt Against England. Its History Is Brief But Important. Early In 1776, The Delegates In Congress From Massachusetts Were Directed To Vote For Independence Of England. Soon Afterwards Several Other Colonies Sent Similar Instructions. ...

Andrew Crosse
Crosse, Andrew, A Remarkable Experimenter On Electricity, B. At Fyne Court, In The Quantock Hills, Somersetshire, June 17, 1784, Was Educated At Bristol And Brasenose College, Oxford, And In 1805-6, Settled On His Paternal Estate, Where He Began To Devote Himself To The Study Of Electricity. Happening On One Occasion ...

Anthony Collins
Collins, Anthony, An Able Free-thinking Writer On Religious Questions, Was B. In 1676, At Heston, Near Hounslow, In Middlesex. Ile Studied At Eton, And Afterwards At King's College, Cambridge. In 1707, He Published His Essay Concerning The Use Of Human Reason; And In 1709, His Priesteraft In Perfection, Etc., Which ...

Antoine Court
Court, Antoine, 1690-1760; Called The "restorer Of Protestantism In France;" Born Of Peasant Parents, Adherents Of The Reformed Church, Which Was Then Undergoing Cruel Persecution. Court Was 8 Years Old When The Camisard Revolt Was Suppressed, And 19 When The Infamous Decree Of Louis Xiv. Was Published, Declaring That All ...

Antonio Allegiii Correggio
Correg'gio, Antonio Allegiii, A Celebrated Italian Painter, Called C. From The Place Of His Birth, A Small Town Near 31cdena, Now Called Reggio. He Was Born In The Year 1493-94, And His Father, A Tradesman Of Some Property, Had Him Carefully Educated, And Instructed In The Rudiments Of Art, By ...

Army Clothing
Clothing, Army, Is One Of The Departments Of The British Military System Into Which, Within Recent Years, Much Change And Improvement Have Been Introduced. In The Time Of Henry Viii., The Soldiers' Dress Was Principally White, With Green Or Russet For Special Corps. In Queen Elizabeth's Reign, A Sum Of ...

Army Cookery
Cookery, Army, Is Now Becoming An Important Feature In The English Military Sys Tem. The Sufferings In The Crimea In The Winter Of 1854-55 Drew Public Attention To The Subject; It Was Then Found That C. Was Little Understood By The British Troops, And That The Soldiers Seldom Had Meat ...

Article I
Article I., Sec. 1. All Legislative Powers Herein Granted Shall Be Vested In A Congress Of The United States, Which Shall Consist Of A Senate And House Of Representatives. Sec. 2. The House Of Representatives Shall Be Composed Of Members Chosen Every Second Year By The People Of The Several ...

Article Ii
Article Ii., Sec. 1. The Executive Power Shall Be Vested In A President Of The United States Of America. He Shall Hold His Office During The Term Of Four Years, And, Together With The Vice-president, Chosen For The Same Term, Be Elected As Follows: Each State Shall Appoint, In Such ...

Article Iii
Article Iii., Sec. 1. The Judicial Power Of The United States Shall Be Vested In One Supreme Court, And In Such Inferior Courts As The Congress May Front Time To Time Ordain And Establish. The Judges, Both Of The Supreme And Inferior Courts, Shall Hold Their Offices During Good Behavior, ...

Article X1v
Article X1v.. Sec. 1. All Persons Born Or Naturalized In The United States, And Subject To The Jurisdiction Thereof, Are Citizens Of The United States, And Of The State Wherein They Reside. No State Shall Make Or Enforce Any Law Which Shall Abridge The Privileges Or Immunities Of Citizens Of ...

Article Xii
Article Xii. The Electors Shall Meet In Their Respective States, 'and Vote By Ballot For President And Vice-president, One Of Whom At Least Shall Not Be An Inhabitant Of The Same State With Themselves. They Shall Name In Their Ballots The Person Voted For As President., And In Distinct Ballots ...

Auguste Comte
Comte, Auguste, The Founder Of The Positive Philosophy, Was B. At Montpellier In 1795 Or 1797. He Studied At Paris; And At An Early Period, It Is Said, Attracted The Attention Of His Companions By The Boldness And Novelty Of His Speculations, Maintain Ing That The Time Was Come When ...

Avglistiis De Morgan
De Morgan, A.vglistiis, Was B. In 1806, In The Small Indian Island Of Madura, On The N.e. Coast Of Java. His Father Was Au Officer In The British Army. He Was Educated At Trinity College, Cambridge, And Took His Degree Of B.a. In 1827, When He Was Fourth Wrangler. He ...

Bath
Bath, A Large Chamber In Which Patients Sit Under Increased Atmospheric Pressure For A Greater Or Shorter Period. An Attempt At This Kind Of Treat Ment Was Made As Early As 1662, By Dr. Henshaw, But Failed Owinr. To The Imperfection Of The Apparatus. The Apparatus, As Now Used, Is ...

Bears Paw Clam
Clam, Bear's Paw, Ilippopus Maculatus, A Bivalve Mollusk Of The South Seas, Of The Family Tridacnidw. The Shell Is Described As "perhaps The Most Beautiful Of Bivalves, Whether In Regard To Form, Texture, Or Color." It Is Therefore A Favorite Shell For Orna Mental Purposes. It Is Transversely Ovate, Ventricose, ...

Bertrand Clausel
Clausel, Bertrand, A French Marshal, Was B. At Mirepoix, In The Department Of Allege, Dec., 1772, And Entered The Army At An Early Age. He Commanded A Brigade In The Italian Campaign Of 1799; Was Made A General Of Division Of The Army Of The North Ill And Distinguished Himself ...

Book Of Daniel
Daniel, Book Of, Derives Its Name From The Chief Person Whose History It Narrates, And Who Is Generally Regarded As Its Author. The Close Correspondence Of Its Predic Tions With Historical Events Has, Indeed, Led Some Writers To Assert That It Was Written By Some Unknown Person About 175 Years ...

Camille Desmoulins
Desmoulins, Camille, One Of The Prominent Personages Of The French Revolution, Was B. In 1792 At Guise, In Picardy; Studied Law At The College Louis-le-grand, Paris; But On Account Of A Stutter In His Speech, Did Not Prosecute The Profession. His Mind Was Filled With Lofty But Confused Notions Of ...

Carlo Giovanni Maria Denina
Deni'na, Carlo Giovanni Maria, An Italian Author, Was 1). 28th Feb., 1731, At Revello, In Piedmont; Studied At Turin, And In 1754, Was Appointed Humanity Professor At Pignerolo, But Was Deprived Of His Offlce On Account Of His Having Written A Comedy In Which There Was Much That Excited The ...

Caroline Frances Cornwallis
Cornwallis, Caroline Frances, Was B. On The 12th 'july, 1786, And Was The Younger Daughter Of The Rev. William Cornwallis, Rector Of Wittersham And Elam In Kent. Her Childhood Was Precocious; But She Escaped The Usual Fate Of Precocious Children. She Lived To A Good Old Age; She Was Even ...

Ccentrus
Ccentrus. See Cestoid Worms. Jacques, D. 1456; A Native Of Bourges, France, Who Opened Trade Between His Country And The States Of The Levant. In 1436, Charles Vii. Made Hint Master Of The Mint Just Established In Paris, And In 1440 His Family Were Ennobled. In 1444, He Was Sent ...

Charles Cornwallis
Cornwal'lis, Charles, Marquis, An English Gen. And Statesman, Son Of Time First Earl Cornwallis, Was B. Dec. 31, 1738, And Was Educated At Eton And Cambridge. He Served As Aide-de-camp To The Marquis Of Granby In The Seven Years' War; In 1776, Was Made A Col., And Four Years Later, ...

Charles Darwin
Darwin, Charles, F.r.s., A Living Naturalist Of The Highest Eminence, Was B. At Shrewsbury, Feb. 12, 1809. He Is The Son Of Dr. Robert W.'darwin, F.r.s., And Grand Son Of Erasmus Darwin (q.v.). His Mother Was A Daughter Of Josiah Wedgwood, The Famous Manufacturer Of Pottery. After Attending A Public ...

Charlotte Saunders Cushman
Cushman, Charlotte Saunders, B. Boston, 1816; D. There 1870. She Was Of Puritan Descent, From Robert, One Of The Organizers Of The Pilgrim Emigration, Himself Arriving But A Few Weeks After The Landing Of The Mayflower. Charlotte Was The Eldest Of Five Children, Left Poor With The Mother By The ...

Ciictirbitacee
Ciictirbita'cee, A Natural Order Of Exogenous Plants, Consisting Chiefly Of Herba Ceous Plants, Natives Of The Warmer Regions Of The Globe, Having Succulent Stems Which Climb By Means Of Lateral Tendrils. There Are Some Shrubby Species. The Fruit (prpo) Is Peculiar; It Is More Or Less Succulent, Has A Thick ...

Circumcision
Circumcision (lat. A Cutting Around), The Cutting Off The Foreskin (praputium), Rite Widely Diffused Among Ancient And Modern Nations. The Prevalent Idea Among Christians Was (and Perhaps Still Is), That The Rite Originated With Abraham, Who (as We Read In Gen. Xvii. 9-14) Was Commanded By God To Circumcise Himself ...

Cistercians
Cistercians, A Religious Order, Taking Its Name From The Parent Monastery Of Citeaux (cistercium), Near Dijon, Which Was Founded In 1098 By The Benedictine Abbot, Robert Of 3io16me. Through The Influence Chiefly Of St. Bernard Of Clairvaux, Who Became A Monk Of Citeaux In 1113, The Order, Within Little More ...

Citation
Citation, The Act Of Calling A Party Into Court To Answer To An Action, To Give Evi Dence, Or To Perform Some Other Judicial Act. Being Derived From The Civil Law, The Term C. Is Known In England Chiefly Or Exclusively In The Ecclesiastical Courts. But It Is In Frequent ...

Citizen
Citizen (fr. Citoyen, Lat. Ciris). Aristotle Defines A C. To Be One To Whom Belongs The Right Of Taking Part Both In The Deliberative, Or Legislative, And In The Judicial Pro Ceedings Of The Community Of Which He Is A Member (politics, Iii. 1). A C., Therefore, Can Exist Only ...

Citpuliyere
Citpuliyere (i.e., Cupule-bearing), Or A Natural Order Of Exogenous Plants, Consisting Of Trees And Shrubs, Natives Of Temperate Climates. The Leaves Are Alternate And Furnished With Stipules. The Male Flowers, And Sometimes Also The Female Flowers, Are Disposed In Catkins (and This Order Is Regarded By Many Botanists As A ...

Citta Vecchia
Citta Vecchia. See Malta. City (fr. Cite, Lat. Cicitas). In The Sense In Which It Was First Used In The Romanic Languages Of Modern Europe, The Word C., Like Its Latin Original, Was Probably Equiva Lent To State (q.v.) (reepublica) Rather Than To Town Or Borough (urbs, Municipiuni); And Whilst ...

Civil List
Civil List. Down To The Period Of The Restoration In 1660, Notwithstanding An Attempt At Negotiation Between James I. And The Parliament For The Commutation Of The Hereditary Revenues Of The Crown, The Whole Expenses Of The Government Of England, Civil And Military, Were Included In One List, Or Rather ...

Civil Service
Civil Service Is A General Name For All The Duties Rendered To And Paid For By The State, Other Than Those Relating To Naval And Military Matters. At The Head Of The British C. S., Which Numbers Above 60,000 Officials Of All Grades, Are Placed The Officers Of The Royal ...

Civilian
Civilian. This Term Has Three Meanings, Which Are Distinct, Though Intimately Related. 1. In A Popular Sense, It Signifies A Person Whose Pursuits Arc Civil; I.e., Neither Military Nor Clerical. 2. As A Law.term, It Means, Either A Person Who Is Versed In The Principles And Rules In Accordance With ...

Civilization
Civilization. This Is A General Term To Designate The Condition Of The More Advanced Nations, As Contrasted With Those That Are Looked Upon As Barbarians Or Sav Ages. We Term The Leading Nations Of Europe Civilized; The Chinese And Tartars Less So; The Red Indians, Australians, Esquimaux. Least Of All. ...

Clackmannanshire
Clackman'nanshire, The Smallest Co. Of Scotland, Bounded N. And W. By Perth Shire And The Ochil Hills; E. By Perthshire And Fifeshire; S. By The Forth, Separating It From Stirlingshire. Its Greatest Dimensions Are 10 By 8 In.; Area, 48 Sq. Miles. Pop. '71, 23,747. 'it Chiefly Consists Of The ...

Clairvoyance
Clairvoyance, As Explained By Mr. Hudson Tuttle—whose Language Is Here In Part Adopted, Some Decided Modifications—"mnst Be Regarded As A Peculiar State Of The Mind, In Which It Is In A Greater Or Less Degree Independent Of The Physical Body. It Presents Many Gradations From Semi-consciousness To Profound And Deathlike ...

Clandestine Marriage
Clandestine Marriage. A Marriage Contracted Without The Due Observance Of Ecclesiastical Ceremonies, Even Where Concealment Was Not The Chief Or Only Object Of The Parties, Is Generally Called A Clandestine Marriage. But, In Scotland, A Distinction Is Made Between Marriages Which Are Clandestine, And Those Which Are Simply Irregular. All ...

Clapperton
Clapperton, Huorr, One Of Those British Travelers That Led The Way In Exploring The Interior Of Africa, Was B. At Annan, In The Co. Of Dumfries, Scotland, In 1788. At The Age Of 17, He Went To Sea; And Being Impressed Into A Man-of-war, Lie Distinguished Him Self By His ...

Claque
Claque (from Fr. Claquer, " To Clap The Hands," Or "applaud") Is The Name Given To A Contrivance For Securing The Success Of A Public Performance Or Production, By Bestowing Upon It Preconcerted Applause, And Thus Giving The Public, Who Are Not In The Secret, A False Notion Of The ...

Clare
Clare, A Maritime Co. In The Province Of Munster, Ireland, Bounded N. By Galway And Galway Bay; C. And S. By The Shannon, And Its Expansion Lough Derg, Separating It From Tipperary, Limerick, And Kerry; W. By The Atlantic. It Lies Between Let. 52° 32' And 53° 7' N., And ...

Clare_2
Clare, Sir James, Bart., A Distinguished Physician, Was Born At Cullen, Banffshire, Dec., 1788. His Early Education Was Obtained At The Grammar-school Of Fordyce; And He Afterwards Passed To King's College, Aberdeen, Where He Took The Degree Of M.a. He Studied Medicine At Edinburgh And London, And Entered As A ...

Clarendon
Clarendon, Constitutio:s.7s Of, Were Laws Made By A Parliament, Or Rather By A General Council Of The Nobility And Prelates, Held At Clarendon, A Village In Wiltshire, In 1164, Whereby King Henry Ii. Checked The Power Of The Church, And Greatly Narrowed The Total Exemption Which The Clergy Had Claimed ...

Clarke
Clarke, Dr. Samuel, An Eminent Philosopher And Theologian, Was B. At Norwich, Oct. 11, 1675, And Educated At Cambridge. The System Of Descartes At That Time Held Almost Universal Sway; But This Failing To Satisfy His Mind, He Adopted The Views Of His Contemporary And Friend, Newton. Along With Philosophy, ...

Claude Crebillon
Crebillon, Claude Prtosren Jolyot De, The Younger, Son Of The Dramatist, Was B. In Paris, Feb. 14, 1707. In An Age Of Licentious Manners, Lie Acquired Popularity By A Series Of Romances, Remarkable Chiefly For Their Violation Of Decency, The Principal Of Which Are Le Sopha; Le Llasard Du Coin ...

Claude Lorraine
Claude Lorraine (properly Named Claude Gelet), A Celebrated Landscape Painter, Was A Native Of Lorraine, And B. In 1600. A Relative, Who Traveled As A Lace Dealer, Took C., When Still A Boy, To Italy, But Deserted Him In Rome. However, He Soon Found Employment In Grinding Colors And Doing ...

Claudius I
Claudius I., Tulemus, A Roman Emperor, The Youngest Son Of Nero Claudius Drusus, Step-son Of The Emperor Augustus, Was B. At 'you 10 B.c. He Was Naturally Sickly And Infirm, And His Education Was Neglected, Or Left To Be Cared For By Women And Freedmen. His Supposed Imbecility Saved Him ...

Clay Soils
Clay Soils Derive Their Character From The Alumina Which They Contain In A State Of Mixture, As Well As In Chemical Combination With Other Substances. Some Soils Contain As Large A Proportion Of Alumina As 40 Per Cent, Hut Generally The Proportion Is Much Smaller. The Feldspar Which Chiefly Yields ...

Clearfield
Clearfield, A Co. In W. Pennsylvania, Intersected By The Susquehanna River And Clearfield Creek, And Reached By A Branch Of The Pennsylvania Central Railroad; 1150 Sq.m.; Pop. '70, 25.741. The E. Portion Is Rugged And Mountainous. But In Other Parts There Is Some Good Land. Coal And Iron Are Plentiful. ...

Clearing House
Clearing-house, In Banking. In New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Cincin Nati, And Other Large' Cities Of The United States, Clearing-houses Have Been For Several Years In Successful Operation. Either A Well-known Bank Or A Special Building Is Used For The Purpose. The Best Equipped And Most Admirably Arranged Clearing-houses Are Those ...

Clemens
Clemens, Trrus Flavms, A Celebrated Father Of The Christian Church, Was Born Probably At Athens, And Resided During The Greater Part Of His Life In Alexandria, Whence The Epithet Alexandrinus. He Flourished At The Close Of The 2d And The Begin Ning Of The 3d Century. In His Earlier Years, ...

Cleon
Cle'on, A Famous Athenian Demagogue, Who Flourished During A Part Of The Peloponnesian War, Was Originally A Tanner, But Having A Strong Bias Towards Poli Tics, He Gradually Abandoned His Business, And Became The Champion Of Popular "rights." He First Became Prominent In The Discussion Regarding The Fate Of The ...

Cleopatra
Cleopa'tra, The Daughter Of The Egyptian King, Ptolemy Auletes, Was B. 69 B.c., And, According To The Will Of Her Father, Should Have Inherited The Throne Along With Her Brother, Ptolemy Dionysus, Who Was Also Her Husband. Her Claim. However, Being Opposed, Julius Cmsar Came To Alexandria, 48 B.c., To ...

Clergy
Clergy (gr. Cleros, A Lot, An Inheritance), A Term Very Generally Applied To The Min Isters Of The Christian Religion, In Contradistinction To The (q.v.). This Use Of The Term Is Very Ancient, And Appears To Have Gradually Become Prevalent, As The Ministers Of Religion More And More Exclusively. Instead ...

Clerk
Clerk, Jolts, Of Eldin, Mid-lothian, Scotland, Inventor Of The Modern British Sys Tem Of Breaking The Enemy's Line At Sea, Was The 6th Son Of Sir John Clerk Of Penicuiek, Hart. Though Not A Naval Man, He Studied Deeply Both The Theory And Practice Of Naval Tactics, And In 1779 ...

Clermont
Clermont (in The Middle Ages, Carus Mons, Or Clarimontium) Is The Name Of Several Towns In France. The Most Important Is The Capital Of The Department Of Puy-de-dame, Clermont-ferrand (the Augustonemetum Of The Romans, In The Country Of The Arverni), Which Is Finely Situated On A Gentle Elevation Between The ...

Cleveland
Cleveland, Next To Cincinnati The Most Commercial City In Ohio, Stands On The S. Shore Of Lake Erie, At The Mouth Of The Cuyahoga, In Lat. 41° 30' N., And Long. 81° 47' West. The Harbor Is One Of The Best On The Coast; And Has Been Rendered Still More ...

Cleveland_2
Cleveland (ante), The Second City Of Ohio, On The Southern Shore Of Lake Erie, 170 M. W. Of Buffalo, And 130 M. N. Of Columbus, Has Grown To Its Present Dimensions From A Small Town Originally Surveyed And Settled In 1796 By Gen. Moses Cleveland, One Of The Directors Of ...

Climate
Climate (from The Greek Klima, A Slope Or Inclination, Afterwards Applied To A Tract Of Country, With Reference To Its Supposed Inclination To The Pole, And The Effect Of The Obliquity Of The Sun's Rays Upon The Temperature), A Term Now Employed As Including Not Merely The Conditions Of A ...

Clipper
Clipper Is A Name Familiarly Given To A Ship Built Expressly For Speed. The Require Ments Of Trades In Which The Merchandise Carried Was Of A Perishable Nature, And Ren Dered A Quick Passage Desirable, Were Probably Among The First Causes Which Directed Scientific Attention To The Lines Of Vessels ...

Cloaca Maxima
Cloaca Maxima. This Was A Subterranean Passage Of Vast Extent, By Which The Whole, Or A Great Part, Of The Filth Of Ancient Rome Was Conveyed To The Tiber. Drains From The Lower Parts Of The City Around The Forum,,,and From Thekther Valleys, Were Commenced By Tarquiuius Priscus; But The ...

Clotairf I And Ii
Clotairf I. And Ii., Kings Of The Franks. See Merovingians. A Name Common To A Number Of Species Of Small Moths Of The Genus Tinea, The Lame Or Caterpillars Of Which Are Extremely Destructive To Woolen Clothes, Furs, Stuffed Quadrupeds And Birds, Etc. Tined Destructor Is One Of The Most ...

Clouds
Clouds Are Masses Of Fog, Consisting Of Minute Particles Of Water, Often In A Frozen State, Floating In The Atmosphere. When Air Saturated, Or Nearly So, With Vapor, Has Its Temperature Lowered, Either By Ascending And Becoming Rarer, Or By Meeting A Colder Current, A Portion Of The Vapor Loses ...

Cloves
Cloves (fr. Elou, A Nail) Are The Flower-buds Of The Clove-tree (caryophyllus Aromaticus). The Genus To Which This Tree Belongs Is Of The Natural Order Myrtacecn; The Calyx Has A Cylindrical Tube And 4-cleft Border; The Corolla Consists Of Four Petals United By Their Tips; The Stamens Are In Four ...

Clovis
Clovis (old Ger. Choldwig, I.e., "famous Warrior;" Modern Ger. Ludwig, Fr. Louis), King Of The Franks, Was B. 465 A.d., And By The Death Of His Father, Childeric, Became King Of The Salian Franks, Whose Capital Was Tournay. His First Achievement Was The Overthrow Of The Gallo-romans Under Syagrius, Near ...

Club
Club. The Word Is Probably Allied To Cleave (ger. Kleben), Adhere," So As To Form One Body Or Mass. Among Other Significations, It Is Used To Mean A Company Or Asso Ciation Met For Some Common Purpose, Whether Of Hilarity, Literature, Politics, Or Econ Omy. C., In Its Usual English ...

Clubbing
Clubbing, In Cabbages, Turnips, And Other Plants Of The Genus Brassica, A Diseased Growth Of Tubercular Excrescences In The Upper Part Of The Root Or Lower Part Of The Stem, Caused By The Larvae Of The Cabbage Fly (q.v.), And Of Other Insects, By Which The Vigorous Growth Of The ...

Clyde
Clyde, A River In The S. Of Scotland. The Only Great British River, Besides The Severn, Flowing West. Commercially It Is The Most Important River In Scotland, And The Romantic Beauty Of Its Scenery Is Widely Celebrated. It Rises By Several Large Streams In The Semicircular Range Of The Lead, ...

Co Operation
Co-operation (ante), As A System Of United Effort For Commercial Or Indus Trial Purposes, Has Been Introduced And Is Spreading Among The Working Classes Of This Country. 1. They Co-operate In Providing Homes For Themselves. Building-loan Associations Have Existed In Philadelphia About 20 Years. The Members Subscribe For A Given ...

Co Operation
Co-opera'tion Is The Term Applied To A System Of United Effort For Commercial Or Industrial Purposes. It Refers Simply To A Joint-stock Copartnery On Ordinary Commer Cial Principles, With Limited Liability Of Members; But By The Interposition Of The Legislature For Protecting Individual Interests, And Encouraging Self-denial And Thrift, It ...

Co Ordinates
Co-ordinates. What Is Called The Method Of C. Is An Invention Of Descartes, Whereby Algebra And The Calculus May Be Employed In Geometrical Investigations. The Method Is Sometimes Called Algebraical Geometry—sometimes, And More Properly, Analytical Geometry; And It Is Commonly Treated Under The Heads "geometry Of Two Dimensions," And "geometry ...

Coach
Coach Is A General Name For A Vehicle Drawn By Horses, Designed For The Conveyance Of Passengers, As Distinguished From A Wagon Or Cart, For The Conveyance Of Goods. Coaches Or Inclosed Carriages, Drawn On Wheels, And Intended For Passengers, Were Inventions Which Have Been Claimed By Hungary, England, Italy, ...

Coaio
Co'aio, A Province Of Lombardy, Italy, On The Border Of Switzerland; 1049 Sq.m.; Pop. '71, 477,642. It Is A Mountainous Region, With Many Small Lakes And Several Rivers, The Adda And Ticino Being The Most Important Streams. The Products Are Corn, Wine, Fruit, Silk, Etc.; And There Are Mines Of ...

Coal
Coal, In The Sense Of A Piece Of Glowing Fuel (and Hence A Piece Of Fuel, Whether Dead Or Alive), Is A Word Common To All The Languages Of The Gothic Stock (ice]. Ka/, Ger. Kdde), And Seems Allied To The Lat. Ealeo, To Be Hot; As Also To Glow, ...

Coal Supply
Coal-supply. Referring To Carboniferous System And Coal For Various Details Connected With The Localities Of Coal-beds, The Diversity Of Qualities, And The Modes Of Working, We Shall Treat Here Of A Question Which Has Recently Been Accepted As One Of Great Importance To The Welfare Of The Nation—viz.: The Amount ...

Coan1a
Coan1a, A River Of Lower Guinea, Western Africa, Which, After A Course Of About 500 Or 600 In., Enters The Atlantic S. Of St. Paul De Loanda, In Lat. About 0" 10's. It Is Navigable For A Considerable Distance, But A Bar At Its Mouth Renders It Inaccessible Save To ...

Coast Survey
Coast Survey, A Scientific Department Of The Government Of The United States, Established For The Purpose Of Making Geodetic And Hydrographie Surveys To Determine The Coast-line, And Of Making Charts Of Harbors And Tide-waters, And Of The Bottom Of The Ocean Along The Coast. It Extends Its Observations To All ...

Cobalt
Cobalt (from Cobalus, A Malicious Sprite Or Gnome) Is A Metal Of No Use In The Arts And Manufactures, But Which Forms Compounds Of Commercial Importance. C. (symbol Co) Is Found Naturally In Combination With Arsenic (as), As Speiss C. (co As); In Combina Tion With Arsenic And Sulphur, As ...

Cobbett
Cob'bett, Wri,lram, A Celebrated English Political Writer, Was B. In Mar., 1762, At Farnham, In Surrey, Where His Father Was A Small Farmer. From His Infancy, He Was Trained In Habits Of Industry And Self-dependence. Taking A Dislike To Rural Occupa Tions, He Went To London, Where He Was Employed ...

Cobra Da Capello
Cobra Da Capel'lo, A Name Sometimes Limited To The Naja Tripudians, And Some Times Extended To All The Species Of The Genus Naja, Very Venomous Serpents Of The Family Viperidie, Remarkable For The Faculty Of Dilating The Back And Sides Of The Neck, Which They Do When Angry Or Otherwise ...