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Collier's New Encyclopedia, Volume 6

Medici
Medici (med'e-che), A Distinguished Italian Family Of Florence, Whose Histor Ical Fame Begins In 1351 With Giovanni De Medici, Who With A Small Body Of 100 Men Forced His Way Through A Milanese Army Which Was Besieging The Fortress Of Scarperia And Relieved The Place. His Son, Salvestro, Who Enjoyed ...

Medicine
Medicine, A Remedy, A Remedial Agent, An Antidote To Disease; Any Sub Stance Prescribed For The Alleviation Or Removal Of Disease. Medicines Are Ad Ministered, As A Rule, By The Mouth, But Sometimes Also By The Rectum, By Inhala Tion Into The Lungs, By Hypodermic In Jection Into The Cellular ...

Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea, A Large And Important Inland Sea, Bounded On The N. By Europe, On The E. By Asia, On The S. By Africa, And Communicating At Its W. Extremity By The Straits Of Gibraltar With The N. Atlantic Ocean, And At Its N. E. Extremity, By The Dardanelles And ...

Melbourne
Melbourne (-burn), The Capital Of Victoria, And The Largest City In Aus Tralia, On The Yarra-yarra River, About 9 Miles From Its Mouth In The Basin Of Port Phillip; Lat. 37° 49' 5" S., Ion. 144' 58' 35" E. Melbourne Is One Of The Most Im Portant Of British Colonial ...

Mercury
Mercury, In Astronomy, The Planet Nearest The Sun. Its Stationary Points Are From 15 To 20 Degrees Of Longitude From The Sun, Hence It Rises And Sets Not Far From The Time When The Sun Does So. The Light Of The Sun And The Haze Of The Horizon Combine To ...

Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia (-ta'inia), In Ancient Geography, A Country Of Western Asia, Situate Between The Tigris And The Euphrates. It Was Called, In The Old Testament, Aram Naharaim, Or "syria Between The Two Waters," And Padan Aram, I. E., "syria Of The Plain," And Is First Mentioned In The Scriptures As The ...

Metallurgy
Metallurgy. For The Specific Treatment Of The Ores Of Copper, Gold, Iron, Silver, Tin, Zinc, Etc., See The Articles On Those Metals. As Now Understood Metallurgy Is The Art Of Extracting Metals From Their Ores. The Operations Are Partly Mechanical And Partly Chemical. Those Processes Which Depend Principally On Chemical ...

Metals
Metals. Though Each Metal Is Con Sidered In A Separate Article, There Are Various Points Regarding The General Physical And Chemical Characters Of These Bodies, And The Method Of Classifying Them, Which Require Notice. A Metal, From The Chemical Point Of View, Is An Element Which Can Replace Hydrogen In ...

Meteor
Meteor, A Luminous Body Appearing For A Few Moments In The Sky, And Then Disappearing, Exploding Or Descending To The Earth; A Shooting Star. On Any Clear Night An Occasional Meteor May Be Seen, But The Most Brilliant Displays Are Con Fined To Particular Dates. A Very Notable One Is ...

Meteorology
Meteorology, That Branch Of Sci Ence Which Observes, Registers, Classifies, And Compares The Various And Varying Phenomena Of Our Atmosphere. It Re Marks, At The Same Time, The Connection Of Those Phenomena With Heavenly Bodies, And With The Solid And Liquid Materials Of The Earth, In Reference To Their Recip ...

Methodism
Methodism, One Of The Leading Re Ligious Systems Of English-speaking Races. A Religious Society Existed At Ox Ford In The Year 1727, Among The Mem Bers Of Which Were John And Charles Wesley And George Whitefield, Young Men Studying For Orders. They And Their Associates Were Half Derisively Called The ...

Metternich
Metternich (met'ter-nili,), Cle Mens, Prince Von, An Austrian Statesman; Born In Coblenz, Prussia, May 15, 1773. He Entered The Diplomatic Service As Secretary At The Congress Of Rastadt, In 1799. He Was Appointed Austrian Ambassador, In Succession, At The Courts Of Dresden, Berlin, And Paris. In 1809 He Was Appointed ...

Mexico
Mexico, A Republic Of North Ameri Ea; Bounded On The N. By The United States; On The E. By The Gulf Of Mexico And The Caribbean Sea; On The S. And S. E. By Guatemala And British Honduras; And On The W. And S. W. By The Pacific Ocean; Area, ...

Michigan
Michigan, A State In The North Central Division Of The North American Union; Bounded By Lake Superior, Lake Michigan, Lake Huron, Ohio, Indiana, Wisconsin, And Ontario; Counties, 83; Area, 57,430 Square Miles; Pop. (1890) 2,093,889; (1900) 2,420,982; (1910) 2, 810,173; (1920) 3,668,412; Capital, Lan Sing. Topography.—the State Is Divided By ...

Military Courts
Military Courts, Commonly Called "courts-martial," Are Courts Established For The Maintenance Of Discipline And The Administration Of Justice In The Mili Tary And Naval Forces. In The United States Such Courts Derive Their Authority From Those Provisions Of The Constitu Tion Which, First, Designate The Presi Dent As "commander-in-chief Of ...

Military Education
Military Education. The Chief Institution For Military Education In The United States Is The United States Mili Tary Academy At West Point, N. Y. This School Equals The Best In Europe In Thoroughness Of Preparation And In The Wide Range Of The Training Given To Mili Tary Officers. After Four ...

Military Insignia
Military Insignia, Devices In The Form Of Badges, Epaulets, Straps, Chevrons, Buttons, Braid, Mottoes, And The Like, Worn To Differentiate The Ranks And Divisions Of The Military And Naval Forces. Insignia For These Purposes Are To-day In Use In The Forces Of All Nations, Though Differing According To The Country ...

Milk
Milk, The Fluid Secreted By All Female Mammals For The Nourishment Of Their Young. As An Alimentary Substance, It May Be Regarded As A Perfect Food. It Consists Essentially Of A Solution Of Sugar, Albuminous And Saline Matter, And Holds In Suspension A Certain Pro Portion Of Fat In The ...

Milwaukee
Milwaukee, A City, Port Of Entry, County-seat Of Milwaukee Co., Wis., And The Largest City In Population And Impor Tance In The State; On The W. Side Of Lake Michigan, At The Mouth Of The Mil Waukee River; 85 Miles N. By W. Of Chi Cago And 83 Miles E. ...

Mineralogy
Mineralogy (-al'-), In Natural His Tory, A Science Treating Of Those Natural Inorganic Products Of The Earth Which Possess Definite Physical And Chemical Characters. In 1669 Nicolas Steno, A Dane, Made The Discovery That In Crys Tals Of Quartz The Angles Of Inclination Of Adjoining Faces Were Constant, And That ...

Mining
Mining, The Processes Whereby Min Erals Are Obtained From Their Natural Lo Calities Beneath The Surface Of The Earth, And The Subsequent Operations By Which Many Of Them Must Be Prepared For The Purposes Of The Metallurgist. The Art Has Been Practiced From The Remotest Times. The Coal Mines Of ...

Minneapolis
Minneapolis, A City And County Seat Of Hennepin Co., Minn.; On Both Banks Of The Mississippi River; The Cele Brated Falls Of St. Anthony Being In The Heart Of The City; Adjoining St. Paul, With Which It Is Connected By Railway And Electric Lines; Area 53 Square Miles; Pop. (1910) ...

Minnesota
Minnesota, A State In The North Central Division Of The United States; Hounded By Manitoba, Ontario, Lake Superior, Wisconsin, Iowa, North Da Kota, And South Dakota; Admitted To The Union May 11, 1858; Counties, 86; Area, 79,205 Square Miles; Pop. (1890) 1,301, 826; (1900) 1,751,394; (1910) 2,075,708; (1920) 2,387,125; Capital, ...

Mint
Mint, The Place Where A Country's Coinage Is Made And Issued Under Spe Cial Regulations And With Public Authority. In Former Times The Coinage Was Made By Contact At A Fixed Price. The Present Mint On Tower Hill, In London, Was Erected Between The Years 1810 And 1815. The English ...

Missions
Missions, An Organized Method Of Propagating A Religion: Specifically, The Propagandism Of Christianity Among The Heathen. Apostolic And Medieval Missions.— The Gospel Made Great Progress During The Lifetime Of The Apostles And Found A Footing In Most Countries To The E. And N. Of The Mediterranean. It Was Also Successfully ...

Mississippi
Mississippi, A State In The South Central Division Of The United States, Bounded By Tennessee, Alabama, Louisi Ana, Arkansas, And The Gulf Of Mexico; Admitted To The Union, Dec. 10, 1817; Area, 46,340 Square Miles; Pop. (1900) 1,551,270; (1910) 1,797,114; (1920) 1,790,618; Capital, Jackson. Topography.—the State Is Divided In To ...

Mississippi River
Mississippi River (from An In Dian Word Signifying Great Water, Or Father Of Waters), A River Of The United States, Forming With Its Tributaries One Of The Great Water Systems Of The World. From The Headwaters Of The Missouri, Which Is Now Recognized As The Parent Stream (the Upper Mississippi ...

Missouri
Missouri, A State In The South Central Division Of The United States, Bounded By Iowa, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kan Sas, And Nebraska; Admitted To The Union, Aug. 10, 1821; Counties, 115; Area, 68,735 Square Miles; Pop. (1900) 3, 108,665; (1910) 3,293,336; (1920) 3,404, 055; Capital, Jefferson City. The ...

Mobile
Mobile, A City, Port Of Entry Anci County-seat Of Mobile Co., Ala., On The Mobile River Near Mobile Bay; 30 Miles From The Gulf Of Mexico, And On The New Orleans, Mobile And Chicago, The Louisville And Nashville, The Southern, The Mobile And Ohio, And The Alabama, Tennessee And Northern ...

Modernism
Modernism, A Doctrine Or System Of Beliefs Held By Many Catholics In The Period 1888-1910 Which Were Opposed To The Traditional Belief Of The Roman Cath Olic Church. In Common With Many Protestants Some Catholics Believed That The Doctrines Of The Church Should Be Interpreted In The Light Of Modern ...

Mohammed
Mohammed (m5-ham'ed), Or Ma Homet (ma-hom'et;),the Arabian Proph Et, And The Founder Of Islam; Born In Mecca, Arabia, A. D. 570 Or 571. He Was The Only Son Of Abdallah And Amina, Being Of The Family Of Hashem, The Most Illustrious In The Noble Tribe Of Koreish, Princes Of Mecca, ...

Mollusca
Mollusca (-1us'ca), In Zoology Ac Cording To Linnmus, An Order Of Vermes, Distinct From Testacea, Which Immedi Ately Follows It. Cuvier Made The Mol Lusca One Of The Four Great "divisions" Or Sub-kingdoms Of The Animal King Dom, Of Equal Rank With The Vertebrata, The Articulata, And The Radiata. He ...

Monachism
Monachism (mon'a-kizm), The Sys Tem Of Monastic Life: Monkery, Monkish Ness. The Ultimate Fact On Which Mona Chism Rests Is That Many People Are Born With A Tendency To Contemplation And, If Pious, Consider That They Will Be More Free From Temptation To Sin By Retiring From The Ordinary World. ...

Monastery
Monastery, A Class Of Structures Which Arose In The Middle Ages To Meet The Requirements Of The Large Number Of Monks That Then Existed. Records Of Abbeys As Early As The 7th Century Show That The Arrangements Were Similar Then To Those Of The 12th Century. There Was, However, One ...

Money
Money, A Term Used To Describe The Medium Of Exchange Of Standard Value Of Any Country. Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper Are The Coinage Of Modern Nations, But Baser Metal Coinage, And Shells, Grains, Sheep, Wampum, Furs, And Other Commod Ities Have Been The Medium Of Exchange Among Primitive People. Money ...

Monroe Doctrine
Monroe Doctrine, A Policy Of The United States, First Definitely Announced By President James Monroe, In His An Nual Message To Congress, 1823, Which Contained The Following Sentences: "we Owe It To Candor And To The Amicable Re Lations Existing Between The United States And The Allied Powers, To Declare ...

Montana
Montana, A State In The Western Division Of The North American Union, Bounded By British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, North Dakota, South Da Kota, Wyoming, And Idaho, Admitted To The Union, Nov. 8, 1889; Number Of Coun Ties, 50; Area, 145,310 Square Miles; Pop. (1890) 132,159; (1900) 243,329; (1910) 376,053; (1920) ...

Montenegro
Montenegro (native Tzrnagora, Turkish Karadagh, All Meaning Black Mountain), Formerly An Independent Principality Of Europe, Situated In The W. Part Of The Balkan Peninsula, And Bounded By Albania, The Adriatic, And The Former Austrian Provinces Of Herzegovina And Dalmatia; Area, About 3,630 Square Miles; Pop. About 250,000. The Surface Is ...

Montessori System
Montessori System, A Method Of Instruction Used By Dr. Maria Montes Sori And, As Yet, Used Only In The Branches Of Elementary Education And With Chil Dren Between The Ages Of 3 And 10 Years. It Is Largely The Development Of The Ideas Of Froebel, And More Especially Of Seguin ...

Month
Month, In Astronomy, Properly The Time In Which The Moon Makes One Com Plete Revolution Round The Earth, Or Ap Pears To Return To Precisely The Same Point In The Heavens From Which It Started. This May Be From Change To Change, From Full Moon To Full Moon, Or In ...

Montreal
Montreal, The Metropolitan City Of Canada; On An Island Of The Same Name, In The Province Of Quebec, At The Head Of Ocean Navigation On The St. Lawrence River; 160 Miles N. Of Quebec. The City, Originally Called Ville Marie, Derives Its Present Name From Mount Royal, Which Rises Abruptly ...

Moon
Moon, The Single Satellite Attendant On The Earth. Its Diameter Is 2,160 Miles, That Of The Earth (which Is 7,918) Being Nearly Four Times As Great. Its Superficial Extent Is About A 13th Part Of The Earth's Surface; Its Bulk Is 1-45 That Of The Earth, But As The Earth ...

Moor
Moor, A Native Of The N. Coast Of Africa, Which Formed The Ancient Mauri Tania, Now Represented By The Countries Of Morocco, Algeria, Tunis, And Tripoli. In 709 The Arabs Conquered Mauritania, And Converted The People To Mohammed Anism. The Conquerors And The Con Quered Amalgamated Together, And In 711 ...

Moscow
Moscow (russian, Moskwa), The Second Capital (formerly The Only Capital) Of The Former Russian Empire. It Is The Chief Town Of The Government Of Moscow, And Is Situated In A Highly Cultivated District On The Moskwa River, 400 Miles S. E. Of Petrograd, With Which It Is In Direct Communication ...

Moses
Moses (egyptian Mo, Water, And Use, Saved), The Son Of Amram And Joahabed, Of The Tribe Of Levi. This Great Jewish Historian And Lawgiver Was Born In Egypt During The Rigor Of The Decree That Commanded The Death Of Every New-born Male Israelite. To Save Her Child, His Mother Made ...

Moth
Moth, The Popular Name Of A Numer Ous And Beautiful Division Of Lepidopter Ous Insects (heterocera), Readily Distin Guished From Butterflies By Their Antennw Varying In Form To A Point Instead Of Terminating In A Knob, By Their Wings Being Horizontal When Resting, And By Their Being Seldom Seen On ...

Motor Cycle
Motor Cycle, A Bicycle, The Frame Of Which Supports An Internal-combus Tion Engine Which Is Used For Propulsion. The Early Models, Which Followed The Lines Of The Foot-powered Bicycle, Were Uncomfortable And Likely To Tip Because Of Their Higher Center Of Gravity. The First Models Had The Fuel Tank Over ...

Motor Vehicle
Motor Vehicle, A Wagon Or Car Riage Carrying A Motor Or Engine Which Furnishes Power For Locomotion Of The Wagon Upon The Roads Or Highways, With Out A Track. The Two General Classes Into Which Motoy Vehicles Are Divided Are Those Which Are Designed To Move Freight, Usu Ally Called ...

Mount Vernon
Mount Vernon, The Estate Of President Washington, In Fairfax Co., Va., On The Right Bank Of The Potomac River; 15 Miles S. Of Washington. The Dwelling Is A Wooden Mansion, 96 Feet Long, Erected On A Bluff 200 Feet Above The River, And Commanding An Excellent View. The Estate, Originally ...

Moving Pictures
Moving Pictures, Also Known As Cinema And Biograph Pictures, An Inven Tion Whereby A Rapid Succession Of Photo Graphs, Thrown On A Screen, Each Suc Ceeding Picture Presenting A Slight Degree Of Progress In Physical Action Over The Preceding One, Produces The Optical Delu Sion Of Actual Movement. So Highly ...

Mozambique
Mozambique, The Principal Province Of Portuguese East Africa. It Lies Be Tween Former German East Africa On The N. And British East Africa On The S. And Extends From Cape Delgado To Kose Bay, A Point Just Below Delagoa Bay, A Distance Of 1,300 Miles. The N. Boundary Is Formed ...

Munich
Munich (nanik) (german Mun Chen), The Capital City Of Bavaria, On An Extensive Plateau, About 1,700 Feet Above Sea-level, Chiefly On The Left Bank Of The Isar. The Old Town Has A Quaint And Irregular Character, But The New Town, Which Has Sprung Up Chiefly To The N. And W., ...

Municipal Government
Municipal Government, The Power Vested In The Officials Of An In Corporated Town Or City To Regulate The Affairs Of The Municipality With A Limited Degree Of Freedom From Interference From The Centralized Government Of The State Or Nation. Municipal Governments Were First Granted This Measure Of Auton Omy Under ...

Municipal Ownership
Municipal Ownership, The Own Ership, And Usually The Operation, Of Public Services Or Industries By A Munici Pality, On A Non-profit-making Basis. This Is A Question Which Within Recent Years Has Become The Subject Of Much De Bate Between Those In Favor Of Private Industry As A Fundamental Principle And ...

Muscle And Muscular Tissue
Muscle And Muscular Tissue, Tissue Specially Distinguished By Its Con Tractile Power, The Instrument By Which All The Sensible Movements Of The Animal Body Are Performed. If Examined Under A High Magnifying Power The Fibers Of Which It Is Composed Are Found To Exist Under Two Forms, Which Can Be ...

Music
Music, Originally, Any Art Over Which The Muses Presided; Afterward, That Science And Art Which Deals With Sounds As Produced By The Human Singing Voice, And By Musical Instruments. The Science Of Music Includes Several Branches: (1) The Physics, That Is, The Analysis Of The Cause And Constitution Of Sound, ...

Mysore
Mysore (mi-sorl, Or Maisur (mi Nor'), A Native State Of Southern India, Bounded By Districts Of The Madras Pres Idency; Area Square Miles; Pop. About 6,000,000. Mysore Is An Extensive Tableland Much Broken By Hill Ranges And Deep Ravines, And Is Divided Into Two Portions, A Little N. Of Lat. ...

N Nitrogen
Nitrogen, N., At. Wt. 14.01, Color Less, Odorless, Tasteless Gas, Forming, Ap Proximately, Four-fifths Of The Atmos Phere. Slightly Lighter Than The Air. Discovered In 1772 By Rutherford, In The University Of Edinburgh. It Can Be Pre Pared By Passing Air Over Some Reagent Which Will Readily React With And ...

Nantes
Nantes (nongt), The 7th Largest City Of France, Capital Of The Department Of Loire-inferieure, On The Right Bank Of The Tidal Loire (here 2,000 Yards Wide, And Joined By The Navigable Erdre And Sevre-nantaise), 35 Miles From The Sea, And 248 S. Vt. Of Paris. The Natural Beauties Of The ...

Naples
Naples (italian, Napoli), A City In Southern Italy, The Largest In The King Dom, On The N. Shore Of The Bay Of Naples, About 160 Miles From Rome. Its Site Is Magnificent, Being On The Side Of A Nearly Semi-circular Bay, Partly Along The Shore, And Partly Climbing The Ad ...

Napoleon I Napoleon Bona
Napoleon I. (napoleon Bona Parte), Called The Great, Emperor Of The French; Born In Ajaccio, Corsica, Aug. 15, 1769. He Was The Son Of Charles Bonaparte, A Noble Corsican Of Little Fortune And His Wife, Letizia Ramo Lino, A Woman Of Great Beauty, Courage, And Ability. Having Early Evinced A ...

Napoleon Iii Charles Loitis
Napoleon Iii. (charles Loitis Napoleon Bonaparte), Emperor Of The French; Born In Paris, France, April 20, 1808. He Was The Youngest Son Of Louis Bonaparte, Brother Of Na Poleon I. And King Of Holland, And Of Hortense De Beauharnais. His Early Life Was Spent Chiefly In Switzerland And Ger Many. ...

Nashville
Nashville, A City, Port Of Delivery, And The Capital Of The State Of Ten Nessee; On The Cumberland River, And On The Nashville, Chattanooga And St. Louis, The Louisville And Nashville And The Tennessee Central Railroads; 233 Miles E. N. E. Of Memphis. This City Is Regarded As The Most ...

Natal
Natal, A British Colony On The S. E. Coast Of Africa, One Of The Original Prov Inces Of The Union Of South Africa. It Is Bounded By The Transvaal Province, Portuguese East Africa, The Indian Ocean, Cape Of Good Hope Province, Basutoland, And The Orange Free State Province; Area, Est. ...

Naturalization
Naturalization, In Law, The Act Of Placing An Alien In The Position, Or In Vesting Him With The Rights And Privi Leges Of A Natural-born Subject. The Naturalization Laws Of The United States Are Wholly The Fabric Of The Federal Gov Ernment, While The Privileges Attendant, So Far As Regards ...

Nature Study
Nature Study, A Course In The Elementary Schools Designed To Give The Child Some Acquaintance With The World Of Nature, Centering Attention Chiefly On Trees, Birds, And Flowers. A Study Of Na Ture Has Been For A Considerable Time Part Of The Curriculum Of Elementary Schools, But Recently The Influence ...

Nauv00
Nauv00, A Village Of Illinois, On The Mississippi River; 14 Miles Above Keokuk. It Was Built By The Mormons (q. V.) In 1840, And In A Few Months Contained A Population Of 15,000. Its Principal Fea Ture Was A Great Temple Of White Lime Stone (1841-1845) ; But It Had ...

Navigation Laws
Navigation Laws. Very Little Change Has Been Made In The Navigation Laws Of The United States Since Their Adoption In 1792-1793. The Main Fea Tures Of These Laws May Be Summed Up As Follows: No Vessel, Unless Entirely Built In This Country And Wholly Owned And Officered By Americans, Is ...

Nebraska
Nebraska, A State In The North Central Division Of The North American Union; Bounded By South Dakota, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, And Wyo Ming; Admitted To The Union, March 1, 1867; Capital, Lincoln; Number Of Coun Ties, 93; Area, 76,840 Square Miles; Pop. (1890) 1,058,910; (1900) 1,068,539; (1910), 1,192,214; (1920) ...

Negro Education
Negro Education In America Be Gan With The Early Efforts Of Individual Masters Or Slave Owners For Economic Reasons. They Were Supplemented By Spanish And French Missionaries As A Part Of Their Effort To Convert The In Dians And The Negroes To Christianity. The First Settlers Of The American Colonies, ...

Nepal
Nepal (ne-par), An Independent Kingdom Of India, On The S. Slope Of The Himalayas; Bounded On The N. By Tibet. On The S. And W. By Bengal, And On The E. By Sikkim; Long. 80° 6'-88° 14' E.; Length 500 Miles; Breadth About 150 Miles; Area About 54,000 Square Miles; ...

Nevada
Nevada, A State In The Western Di Vision Of The North American Union; Bounded By Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, And California ; Admitted To The Union, Oct. 31, 1864; Counties, 17; Capital, Car Son City; Area, 107,740 Square Miles; Pop. (1890) 45,761; (1900) 42,335; (1910) 81,875; (1920) 77,407. Topography.—the State ...

New Britain
New Britain, A City In Hartford Co., Conn.; On The New York, New Haven, And Hartford Railroad; 10 Miles S. W. Of Hartford. Here Are A High School, State Normal School, Public Library, Technical School, New Britain Institute, Hospital, Electric Lights, Street Railroads, Water Works On The Gravity System, Daily ...

New Hampshire
New Hampshire, A State In The North Atlantic Division Of The North American Union; Bounded By Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, Quebec, And The Atlantic Ocean; One Of The Original 13 States; Capital, Concord; Number Of Counties, 10; Area, 9,005 Square Miles; Pop. (1890) 376,530; (1900) 411,588; (1910) 430,572; (1920) 443,083. Surface ...

New Haven
New Haven, A City And County Seat Of New Haven Co., Conn., At The Head Of New Haven Bay, An Excellent Harbor 4 Miles Long That Sets In North Wardly From Long Island Sound. The City Is Located On The New York, New Haven, And Hartford Railroad, 73 Miles N. ...

New Jersey
New Jersey, A State In The North Atlantic Division Of The North American Union; Bounded By New York, Pennsyl Vania, Delaware, The Atlantic Ocean And Delaware Bay; One Of The Original 13 States; Counties, 21; Capital, Trenton; Area, 8,224 Square Miles; Pop. (1890) 1,444,933; (1900) 1,883,669; (1910) 2,537,167; (1920) 3,155,900. ...