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Encyclopedia Americana, Volume 8

Dance Of Death
Dance Of Death, A Grotesque Allegori Cal Representation In Which The Figure Of Death Under Various Forms Takes The Lead, Followed By Dancers Of All Ages And Conditions. It Was Fre Quently Drawn By Artists Of The Middle Ages For Cemeteries And Cloisters. These Representations Were Common In Germany, And ...

Dancing
Dancing, A Form Of Exercise Or Amuse Ment In Which One Or More Persons Make A Series Of Graceful Movements In Measured Steps In Accord With Music. Aristotle Ranked Dancing With Poetry, And Pindar Applies The Name Of ((the Even To Apollo. Dancing- Corre Sponds To A Universal Primitive Instinct ...

Dane
Dane, Nathan, American Jurist: B. Ips Wich, Mass., 27 Dec. 1752; D. Beverly, 15 Feb. 1835. He Was Graduated From Harvard In 1778, Studied Law In Salem, Mass., And Began Prac Tising In The Adjoining Town Of Beverly In 1782, Where He Resided Until His Death. In 1812 He Was ...

Danichich
Danichich, Diee-chich, Dpro (ser Bian Djuro Dancecc(), Serbian Philologist: B. Neusatz, 1825; D. 1882. Educated At Neusatz, Presburg And Buda-pesth, He Came To Vienna In 1845 Where He Met The Famous Serbian Scholar Vuk Stefanovich-karadjich, And Dedicated All His Efforts To The Study Of Serbian And Other Slavonic Languages. In ...

Daniel
Daniel (heb. "god Is My Judge"). The Hero And Putative Author Of The Book Of Daniel. According To This Book, He Was Carried Away From Jerusalem By Nebuchadnezzar In The Third Year Of Jehoiakim, I.e., 606 A.c. Although At The Time A Youth, He Was Old Enough To Be F ...

Daniel
Daniel, Book Of. In The Greek Bible And Its Daughter Versions, As Well As In The Syriac Peshita, The Latin Vulgate And Most Modern Translations, The Book Of Daniel Has A Position Among The Prophets; But In The Hebrew Bible Its Place Is Among The Hagiographa, Near The End Of ...

Danish Language
Danish Language. The Danish Lan Guage Belongs To The Scandinavian Group Of The Germanic Languages. This Group Comprises, In Modern Times, Besides The Language Already Mentioned, The Dano-norwegian, The Nor Wegian Landsmaal, The Swedish, The Icelandic And The Faroish Languages. The Earliest Specimens, Still Preserved, Of The Primitive Scandinavian Language ...

Danish Literature
Danish Literature. Danish History May Properly Be Divided Into Three Epochs: The Heathen Age, From The Earliest Times To 1000; Midde Age, 1000-1500; Modern Age, 1500 To The Present. Apart From The Runic Inscriptions, No Literature Originating In The First Period Has Been Preserved. Great Danish Scholars As Rask, One ...

Danites
Danites, Dinits, A Former Secret Society Of The Mormon Church, For Militant Action Against Its Enemies. It Was Organized By Joseph Smith At Kirtland, Ohio, 30 March 1836, By A °covenant* To Avenge Any Further Expulsion Of The Missouri Mormons By Mobs; On The Basis Of A "revelation* Of 6 ...

Dante
Dante (orig. Durante) Alighieri, Dan'ta Ale-gya're, Italian Poet: B. Florence, May 1265; D. Ravenna, Italy, 14 Sept, 1321. He Was Of A Family Belonging To The Lower Nobil Ity And Of Mixed Descent, The Aldighieri, Or Alighieri, Being Originally Teutonic. He Lost His Father In Early Life, But His Mother ...

Dantsic Dantzic
Dantzic, Dantsic, Or Danzig, Dint'slir, Germany, City And Port Of Prussia, Capital Of The Province Of West Prussia, 253 Miles Northeast Of Berlin; On An Arm Of The Vistula (now Cut Off By A Dam From The River), About Three Miles Above Its Mouth, And On The Mottlau, Several Arms ...

Danube
Danube (ancient, Danubius ; German, Donau ; Hungarian, Duna), The Second River Of Europe, Originating In Two Small Streams, The Brege And The Brigach, Rising On The East Slope Of The Schwarzwald, A Mountainous Region Of Southwest Germany (the Black Forest), In The Grand-duchy Of Baden, At An Elevation Of ...

Danville
Danville, Va., City And County-seat Of Pittsylvania County, On The Dan River, 140 Miles Southeast Of Richmond, On The Danville And Western And The Southern Railroads. One Of The Oldest Cities In The South; Incorporated As A Town In 1792. For A Short Time During The Last Days Of The ...

Daphnis And Chloe
Daphnis And Chloe. This Greek Prose Pastoral Romance, Attributed To One Longus, About Whom Nothing Is Known, May Have Been Written In The 2d Or Early In The 3d Century A.d. Despite Many Marks Of Decadence, It Is By Far The Most Delightful Of The Greek Romances. Daphnis, A Boy, ...

Darboy
Darboy, Dar-bwi, Georges, Archbishop Of Paris: B. Fayl-billot, Department Of Haut Marne, 16 Jan. 1813; D. Paris, 24 May 1871. He Was Admitted To The Priesthood 1836, And Began Regular Parish Work; But In 1839 Became Professor, First Of Philosophy, Then Of Dogmatic Theolpgy In The Ecclesiastical Seminary Of Lan ...

Dardanelles
Dardanelles (ancient Hellespont), A Narrow Channel In The Turkish Dominions, Which Connects The Sea Of Marmora With The Iegean Sea And Separates Europe From Asia. It Is About 42 Miles In Length, Varying In Breadth From 1,400 Yards To Five Miles. There Is Always A Rapid Current In The Channel, ...

Darfur
Darfur, Diefoor, Or Darfoor (coun Try Of The Fur, A Tribe Of Negroes), A Region Of Central Africa, Occupying A Large Portion Of The Area Between Abyssinia And Bornou And Forming Part Of The Egyptian Sudan. It May Be Considered As Lying Between Lat. 10° And 16° N. And Long. ...

Dargan
Dargan, Edmund Spawn, American Jurist: B. Montgomery County, S. C., 15 April 1805; D. Mobile, November 1879. He Was The Son Of A Baptist Minister Of Irish De Scent, At Whose Death He Was Left Without Means. By His Own Exertions, He Obtained A Fair Knowl Edge Of English, Latin ...

Darien
Darien (sp. Da-re-an'), The Colony Of, Established By The Spaniards On The Gulf Of Uraba (see Darien, Gulf Of), In The First Dec Ade Of The 16th Century, Was The Centre From Which Exploring Expeditions Were Sent Out Until Panama Was Founded In 1519. A Notary Of Tri Ana, Named ...

Darien Scheme
Darien Scheme, A Celebrated Financial Project, Conceived And Set Afloat By William Paterson (q.v.), A Scotchman, Toward The Close Of The 17th Century. On His Original And Osten Sible Design Of Establishing An East India Trade In Scotland He Ingrafted The Secret And Magnifi Cent Plan Of Forming An Emporium ...

Dark Day
Dark Day, A Name Frequently Used In This Country In Connection With 12 May 1780, But Applied Also To Days On Which Similar Phe Nomena Have Been Discerned. On The Date Men Tioned The Atmosphere In New England Was So Obscure As To Cause In Some Places Cessation From Outdoor ...

Darmstadt
Darmstadt, Dfirm'stiit, Germany, Capi Tal Of The Grand Duchy Of Hesse, Near The Darm River, 15 Miles South Of Frankfort. It Consists Of An Old And A New Town. The Former, Which Is The Business Part Of The Town, Is Very Poorly Built; The Houses Are Old, And The Streets ...

Darmstadter Bank
Darmstadter Bank, The. The Darmstadter Bank Was Established At Darm Stadt In 1853 As The Bank Fiir Handel Und Industrie, But It Is From 1856 That Its Important Activities Begin. Its Initial Authorized Capital Was 25,000,000 Florins (say 42,750,000 Marks), Of Which 10,000,000 Florins Were Issued At First. While Devoted ...

Darr
Darr), Ruben, Nicaraguan Poet: B. 1867; D. Leon, Nicaragua, 7 Feb. 1916. He Was Of Mixed Indian And Spanish Blood, And The Blend Ing Of These Two Strains Produced In Him A Literary Temperament Very Different From That Of Spanish Writers Born And Educated In Spain. Dario Had Much In ...

Darter
Darter, A Name Given To Water Birds Of A Small Family (anhingida), Found In The South Ern United States, In Africa, Asia And Australia. The American Species (plotus Anhinga), Also Called The Snake-bird And Water-turkey, Is Espe Cially Common In Florida, And Extends North Ward To North Carolina And Illinois. ...

Dartmoor
Dartmoor, An Extensive, Rugged, Moun Tainous Tract In England, In The Western Part Of Devonshire, Often Called The Eforest Of Dartmoor,)) Hut At Present Having No Appearance Of A Forest, Except What Is Afforded By Some Dwarf .oaks, Intermixed With Ash And Willow, •. • Reaching From Brent South To ...

Dartmoor Massacre
Dartmoor Massacre, The, 6 April 1815. During The War Of 1812 The American Prisoners Of The British, With Impressed American Seamen Discharged From British Ves Sels, Were Collected At Dartmoor Military Prison. On 31 March 1815 They Numbered 5,693, Includ Ing About 1,000 Negroes. They Had Heard Of The Peace ...

Dartmouth College
Dartmouth College, A Seat Of Learning In Hanover, N. H., Which Received Its Charter In 1769 And Opened Its Doors The Follow Ing Year Under The Presidency Of Eleazer Wheelock, D.d. It Grew Out Of An Earlier School Established By Eleazer Wheelock In Lebanon, Conn., And Was Intended For The ...

Dartmouth College Case
Dartmouth College Case, The. The Dartmouth College Case Is The Name By Which Is Commonly Known The Action Entitled Trustees Of Dartmouth College V. Woodward, Which Is Repeated In Volume Four Of Wheaton's 'united States Supreme Court Reports.' Per Haps No Decision Ever Rendered In Any Tribunal Has Attracted More ...

Darwin
Darwin, Charles Robert, English Nat Uralist: B. Shrewsbury, 12 Feb. 1809; D. Down, Kent, 19 April 1882. His Father, Robert Waring Darwin, Was A Distinguished Physician Of That Town, The Son Of A Still More Distinguished Father, Erasmus Darwin (q.v.). He Was Edu Cated At Shrewsbury School, And At The ...

Darwinian Theory
Darwinian Theory, The Explanation Of The Working Of Natural Selection In Effecting Specific Changes In Plants And Animals. 'dar Winism' Must Not Be Confused With 'evolution? The Term Darwinism Is Applied To One Particu Lar Interpretation Of The Mechanism Of The Uni Verse, And Is Summarized In Darwin's Great Work, ...

Dasyure
Dasyure, A Marsupial Native To Australasia; And Belonging To The Family Dos Yuride. Dasyures Are The Survivors Of The Fossil Forms Found In Tertiary Strata In South America, And Elsewhere; And Are Allied To The Opossum. The Hind And Fore Legs Are About Equal In Length, And The Toes Are ...

Date Or Date Palm
Date Or Date Palm (pkwnix Dactyl Ifera), A Tall Tree Of The Natural Order Palma Cecr. It Is Most Notable For Its Fruit, Which Is An Important Part Of The Daily Food Of The Natives Of Western Asia And Northern Africa, Where The Tree Is Indigenous And From Whence Large ...

Daubeny
Daubeny, Da'be-ni Or Dob'nt, Charles Giles Bridle, English Scientist: B. Stratton, Gloucestershire, 11 Feb. 1795; D. Oxford, 13 Dec. 1867. He Was Educated At Winchester School And Magdalen College, Oxford, And Practised For Some Years As A Physician In Ox Ford. In 1819 He Visited Auvergne, And In 1837 Made ...

Daudet
Daudet, Do-di, Alphonse, French Novel Ist: B. Nimes, 13 May 1840; D. Paris, 16 Dec. 1897. He Was Educated At The Lyons Lye& And For Two Years After Leaving It Supported Himself As An Usher At Alais. Going To Paris In 1857 He Took To Writing Verse, His First Volume ...

Daumier
Daumier, Honore, French Caricaturist And Painter : B. Marseilles, 26 Feb. 1808; D. Valmondois, 10 Feb. 1879. His Father Tried To Dissuade Him From Entering The Artistic Profession By Apprenticing Him To A Huissier And Later With A Bookseller. He Managed, However, To Master The Technique Of Lithography And Entered ...

Dauphin
Dauphin, Di'fln, Fr. Do-fifi, The Title Of The Eldest Son Of The Ding France. Dauphin Was Originally A Title Held By Several Of The Feudal Lords Of France And Is Believed To Have Originated From The Dolphins (fr. Dauphin) Worn On Their Helmets Or Used As A Family Crest. In ...

Dauthendey
Dauthendey, Max, German Poet : B. Wiirzburg, 1867. He Is Descended From An Old Family Of The Nobility, Which Came To Germany From France And England In The 16th Century. His Father Achieved Some Dis Tinction As A Pupil Of Daguerre In Paris And Subsequently As Court Photographer In Saint ...

Davenport
Davenport, John, American Puritan Clergyman: B. Coventry, England, 1597; D. Boston, Mags., 15 March 1670. Educated At Oxford, He Became Chaplain Of Hilton Castle, Near Durham, Later Was Made Minister Of Saint Stephen's Church, London (1616-33), And There Attained A Considerable Reputation As A Preacher. His Puritanical Principles And Views ...

Davenport_2
Davenport, Iowa, City Of Scott County, Of Which It Is The County-seat, On The Western Bank Of The Mississippi, Opposite Rock Island, 330 Miles Above Saint Louis, And 184 Miles West By South Of Chicago, On The Burlington, Cedar Rapids And Northern, The Chicago, Mil Waukee And Saint Paul, The ...

David
David, 2d King Of Israel, Shepherd And Harpist, Royal Armor Bearer And Warrior, Exile And Monarch, Psalmist And Conqueror. Biblical Sources Present A Strictly Historical Pic Ture Of One Of The Leading Characters In Scrip Ture, Embellished In Later Legends, Rabbinical And Mohammedan. According To 1 Chron. Xl 15, J ...

David Copperfield
David Copperfield. This Novel Peered In 20 Monthly Numbers, Beginning In May 1849 And Ending In November 1850. After• Finishing The Novel, Dickens Remarked That He Liked It The Best Of All His Books. His Fondness, For This Child Of His Fancy, As He Called It, Was. Partly Due To ...

David Ii
David Ii, King Of Scotland: B. Dunferm Line, Scotland, 5 March 1324; D. Edinburgh, 22 Feb. 1371. He Was The Son Of Robert Bruce (q.v.), And Succeeded To The Throne In 1329. On The Death Of His Father He Was Acknowledged By The Great Part Of The Nation. Edward Baliol, ...

David_2
David, Jacques Louis, French Painter: B. Paris, 30 Aug. 1748; D. Brussels, 29 Dec. 1825. He Studied Under Vien And Entered The Schools Of The Academy. After Obtaining The Grand Prize In Paris He Studied In Rome From 1775 To 1780, Devoting Himself Particularly To Historical Painting. He Visited Rome ...

David_3
David, Pierre Jean, French Sculptor: B. Angers, 12 March 1789; D. Paris, 5 Jan. 1856. He Is Commonly Called David D'angers. Against His Father's Wishes He Came To Paris In 1808, And For A Time Had A Hard Struggle With Poverty. In 1810 He Entered The Atelier Of Rolland And ...

Davidson
Davidson, James Wheeler, American Capitalist: B. Austin, Minn., 14 June 1872. He Was Graduated From The Northwestern Military Academy, Highland Park, Ill., In 1891. He Was A Member Of The Peary Artic Expedition To The North Polar Regions, 1893-94; War Correspond Ent With Chinese Army, 1895; And With The Japa ...

Davis
Davis, Arthur Hoey, Australian Literary Man: B. Drayton, Queensland, Australia, 14 Nov. 1861. After Spending Six Years In A Somewhat Venturesome Life For A Boy, From 1882 To 1888, On Sheep And Stock Farms, He Entered The Office Of The Curator Of Intestate Estates At Brisbane, And The Following Year ...

Davis_2
Davis, Henry Winter, American States Man And Orator: B. Annapolis, Md., 16 Aug. 1817; D. Baltimore, Md., 30 Dec. 1865. He Was A Member Of Congress For Three Terms (1856 65), And Took A Leading Part In Advocating Emancipation And Loyalty To The Union. His Published Works Are The War ...

Davis_3
Davis, Richard Harding, Americanjour Nalist And Popular Novelist: B. Philadelphia. Pa., 1864; D. Mount Kisco, N. Y., 11 April 1916. His Mother Was Rebecca Harding Davis. He Was Educated At Lehigh And At Johns Hop Kins; Became A Reporter On The Philadelphia Record In 1887; And In 1888 Went To ...

Davitt
Davitt, Michael, Irish Nationalist Politi Cian And Journalist: B. Straid, County Mayo, 25 March 1846; D. Dublin, 31 May 1906. His Par Ents, Peasant Farmers, Were Evicted From Their Farm In 1851 And Migrated To Lancashire, Where At The Age Of 10 Michael Began Work In A Cotton Mill At ...

Davout
Davout, Cli'voo', Louis Nicholas, Duke Of Auerstadt, Prince Of Eckmiihl And Marshal Of France: B. Annoux, Yonne, 10 May 1770; D. Paris, 1 June 1823. He Was Educated At Bri Enne And Entered The Army As Sub-lieutenant Of Cavalry In 1788. On The Outbreak Of The Revo Lution He Embraced ...

Dawn
Dawn, The. Or More Cor Rectly 'the Dawns' Aubes> ), Is Generally Regarded As The Greatest Symbolistic Drama Of Emile Verhaeren. It Differs From The Plays Of His Belgian Countryman, Maeterlinck, In Con Tent, In That It Concerns Itself Directly With Social Problems And The Social Revolution Of The Future, ...

Dawson
Dawson, Ga., City And County-seat Of Terrell County, On The Central Of Georgia And The Seaboard Air Line Railroads, 95 Miles South West Of Macon. It Has Oil, Lumber Aid Grist Mills And Is The Centre Of A Cotton And Fruit Growing District. It Contains A Carnegie Library. It Was ...

Day Nurseries
Day Nurseries, Institutions For The Care Of Those Infants Whose Mothers' Occupa Tions Oblige Them To Work Away From Home During The Day. The Movement Originated In France Under The Leadership Of Marbeau In 1844. A Society Was Formed For The Propaga Tion And Support Of These Nurseries, Which Was ...

Daylight Saving
Daylight Saving. A Movement Originated In England By William Willett (1857-1915) In 1907 By The Publication Of A Booklet Entitled The Waste Of Daylight.' Briefly Stated, His Scheme Aimed At Securing More Daylight Leisure For Recreation And Lessen Ing The Work Performed By Artificial Light Dur Ing The Summer Months. ...

Dayton
Dayton, Ohio, City And County-seat Of County, At The Confluence Of The Great Miami, Mad, And Stillwater Rivers And Wolf Creek. It Is On The Erie, The Big Four And The Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago And Saint Louis And The Baltimore And Ohio Rail Roads, 67 Miles Southwest Of Columbus And ...

De Bary
De Bary, Bi're, Heinrich Anton, Ger Man Botanist: B. Frankfort-on-main, 26 Jan. 1831; D. Strassburg, 19 Jan. 1888, After A Course Of Medical Studies He Began In 1853 To Practice In His Native City, But Next Year Be Came A Privat-docent In Tiibingen, And The Year After Was Called To ...

De Civitate Dei
De Civitate Dei, The City Of God.' Augustine's Characteristic Theological System Is To Be Looked For Elsewhere In His Writings Against Pelagius And The Donatists: The Depths Of His Individual Religious Experiences Are Re Vealed With Keen Powers Of Self-analysis In 'the Confessions.' The Title Of The Present Work Suggests ...

De Facto
De Facto. The Word De Facto Means 'actual, In Fact, Based On Fact," In Contradis Tinction To De Jure, Which Means Abased On Law, By Right, By Lawful. Title? A De Facto Govern Ment Is Always A Usurpation And May Be Said To Exist When The Usurping Government Has Ex ...

De Forest
De Forest, Jesse, The Reputed Founder Of New York City And Walloon Ancestor Of Many Thousands Of Americans: B. About 1575 At Avesnes, Hainanlt ; D. 1624. He Was Married To Marie Du Cloux, 23 Sept. 1601. In Sedan, Also, On 22 July 1604, Henry De Forest, Founder Of Harlem, ...

De Forest Wireless Tele
De Forest Wireless Tele Graph System, The. The Inception Of This System, Invented By Dr. Lee De Forest, Dates Back To 1899. Dr. De Forest's Original Idea Was To Develop A Receiver, Working On An Electrolytic Principle, Which Would Be Entirely Automatic In Its Actions, Requiring No Tapping Back Or ...

De Garmo
De Garmo, Charles, American Educator: B. Mukwanago, Wis., 7 Jan. 1849. He Was Graduated From The State Normal University Of Illinois In 1873; Was Principal Of Public Schools, Naples, Ill., 1873-76; Professor Of Modern Lan Guages At The State Normal University 1886-90, And President Of Swarthmore College 1891-98. Since 1898 ...

De Gerando
De Gerando, Zha-rati-do, Joseph Marie, Bar" French Philosopher And Statesman: B. Lyons, 29 Feb. 1772; D. Paris, November 1842. On The Siege Of Lyons In 1793 He Took Up Arms In Its Defense, And Greatly Distinguished Him Self By His Bravery, But Was Subsequently Obliged To Flee. He Returned To ...

De Quincey
De Quincey, Thomas, English Miscel Laneous Writer: B. Manchester, England, 15 Aug. 1785; D. Edinburgh, 8 Dec. 1859. In A Striking Sense, Dequincey's Life And Writings Are Distinct; For By Far The Most Interesting Events In His Life Took Place Before 1821, The Year Of His First Publication, After Which ...

De Quinceys Autobiographic Sketches
De Quincey's Autobiographic Sketches. What Is Commonly Called 'the Autobiography' Of Thomas Dequincey Is More Accurately Entitled 'autobiographic Sketches.' This Latter Title Suggests The Mode Of Com Position. Dequincey Did Not Deliberately Plan And Forthwith Compose His Autobiography. Rather He Began By Contributing Reminiscent Articles To Periodicals, A Practice Which ...

De Rerum Natura
De Rerum Natura, De Ra-rum Niitoo'ra ('on The Nature Of Things)), A Philo Sophical Poem Of About 7,500 Hexameter Verses, Conceived And Written In The Grand Style That Is Part Of The Epic Form, And Dealing With The Physical Constitution And Environment Of Human Life With A View To The ...

De Rosset
De Rosset, Armand John, American Physician: B. Wilmington, N. C., 17 Nov. 1767; D. There, 1 April 1859. He Was The Son Of Moses John De Rosset Of London And Mary Ivie, A Native Of The West Indies. In 1784 He Was Matriculated At Princeton. At The Close Of The ...

Deacon
Deacon (from The Greek Diakonos, A Servant), A Person Who Belongs An Inferior Order Of Ministers In The Christian Church. Seven Were Apparently First Instituted By The Apostles (acts, Chap. Vi), Which Number Was Retained A Long Time In Several Churches. In The Roman Catholic Church, A Sacred Minister Whose ...

Deaconesses
Deaconesses, In The Time Of The Apostles, Were Usually Widows Who Assisted In The Solemn Baptism Of Women (by Immersion), Instructed Female Catechumens In The Doctrines And Usages Of The Church, Visited Those Of Their Sex Who Were Sick Or Were In Prison For The Faith's Sake, Dispensed The Alms ...

Dead
Dead, Disposal Of The. In Every Age And In All Countries, The Living Have Shown Their Respect For The Dead By Various Modes Of Burial Ceremony, And The Religion And Laws Of All Countries Reflect In Large Measure This Feeling Of Reverence For The Memory Of Those Who Have Gone ...

Dead Line
Dead Line. A Phrase Which Probably Originated During The Civil War. In Some Of The Prison Camps A Line Was Drawn Through Or Around The Camp. If A Prisoner Attempted To Cross The Line He Was Shot At Once. To The Men It Became The Dead-line. In A Figurative Sense ...

Dead Sea
Dead Sea, The Usual Name Given To A Most Remarkable Lake In The Southeast Border Of Palestine, Called In The Old Testament °the Salt Sea,' °sea Of The Plain* Or °east See; By Josephus, °lacus Asphaltites°•, And By The Arabs Now, Bahr-llit, "sea Of Lot.* It Lies Along The Line ...

Dead Souls
Dead Souls. Gogol Was Indebted To The Great Russian Poet, Pushkin, For The Subject Of His °epoch-making° Satire, Chichikova Tli Myertvuiya Dushi.> (chichikof's Adventures Or Dead Souls)— Perhaps Better Translated (dead Serfs'.) And To 'don Quixote> For Its Plan. Under The Old ,regime In Russia The Serfs, •fastened To The ...

Deaf
Deaf, The ('deaf And Dumb,' *deaf Mutes"). The Term °the Deaf* Is Used In This Article To Designate The Class Of Persons Who Are Unable On Account Of Deafness To Be Taught In Ordinary Schools And Consequently Must Re Ceive Their Education In Special Schools Or Through Special Teachers At ...

Deaf Blind
Deaf-blind, The. "obstacles Are Things To Be Overcome Is The Motto Given By Dr. Howe To The Perkins Institution For The Blind. When This Remarkable Man Learned In 1837 That Up In The Mountains Of New Hampshire There Was A Little Girl Not Only Blind But Also Deaf And Dumb, ...

Deak
Deak, Da-ak, Ferencz, Hungarian States Man: B. Sojtar, Zala, Hungary, 17 Oct. 1803; D. Budapest, 29 Jan. 1876. Having Studied Law At Raab, He Practised For Sometime As A Barrister, But His Political Career Began With His Election To The National Diet In 1832. He Soon Became, In Spite Of ...

Dean
Dean, In Ecclesiastical Language, A Church Dignitary Presiding Over The Chapter Of A Cathe Dral. The Word Is From The French Doyen And From The Latin Decanus, One Set Over 10 (gr. Deka, Lat. Decem, 10). Originally Decanus Was The Designation Of A Petty Civil Functionary: Its Ecclesiastical Use Had ...