Home >> Encyclopedia Americana, Volume 8 >> Curzon to Danbury

Encyclopedia Americana, Volume 8

Curzon
Curzon, George Nathaniel (earl Cuv Zon Or Kedleston), English Statesman And Ad,: Ministrator: B. Kedleston, 11 Jan. 1859,. He Was Educated At Eton And Balliol College, Oxford;; Became Assistant Private Secretary To The Mar Quis Of Salisbury In 1885 And Next Year Was Elected Member Of Parliament For The South ...

Cusack
Cusack, Thomas F., American Roman Catholic Bishop: B. New York, 22 Feb. 1862; D. Albany, N. Y., 12 July 1918. His Early Years Were Spent In The E.ast Side Of New York And It Was In That Section That He Spent Most Of His Priestly Career. He Attended The Public ...

Cushing
Cushing, Caleb, American Jurist And Diplomatist: B. Salisbury, Mass., 17 Jan. 1800; D. Newburyport, Mass., 2 Jan. 1879. His In Tellectual Abilities Manifested Themselves Early. He Entered Harvard College At 13 And Was Graduated In 1817. He Then Studied Law, Was Admitted To The Bar At 22 And Soon Acquired ...

Custer
Custer, George Armstrong, American General: B. New Rumley, Ohio, 5 Dec. 1839; D. 25 June 1876. He Was Graduated At West Point, 1861, Was Made Second Lieutenant And His First Day At The Front Was At Bull Run, On Kearny's Staff. He Then Went On W. F. Smith's, In Charge ...

Custom
Custom Is The Legal Term Applied To Un Written Law Established By Common Consent And Uniform Practice From Time Immemorial. Some Thing Which, By Its Universality And Antiquity, Acquired The Force And Effect Of Law In The Par Ticular Place Or Country In Respect To The Sub Ject Matter To ...

Custom House
Custom-house, An Establishment Where Commodities Are Entered For Importation Or Exportation; Where Duties, Bounties Or Draw Backs, Payable Or Receivable Upon Such Importa Tion Or Exportation, Are Paid Or Received, And Where Ships Are Entered And Cleared. In The United States, The Custom-house Of Each Port Is Under The Direction ...

Customary Law
Customary Law Is That Law Which Has For Its Basis—usage, And Therefore May Be Abrogated By Usage. It Derives Its Whole Au Thority From The Silent Assent Of Those Who Are Affected By It. A Usage Cannot Be Sustained In Opposition To Well-established Principles Of Law. To Sustain A Usage ...

Customs Duties
Customs Duties, The Portion Of A State's Revenue Derived From A Tax On Imports. In Some Countries, Customs Duties Are Imposed On Certain Exports Also. The Origin Of The Term Is Connected With The Long Conflict Between The Crown And Parliament As To The Right Of Taxa Tion, Although The ...

Cutaneous Sensations
Cutaneous Sensations. Those Sensations Experienced From The Excitement Solely Of The Organs Of The Skin. Although Psychologists Have Been In Wide Disagreement As To The Seat Of Many Specific Sensations, It Seems Now To Be Definitely Decided That Sensa Tions Of The Skin Are Only Four In Number : Pres ...

Cuthbert
Cuthbert, Saint, English Anchoret, Cenobite And Bishop: B. About 633; D. Fame, Northumbria, 20 March 687. He Is One Of The Three Most Eminent Saints Of The Church In England, The Other Two Being Saint Edmund Of Edmundsbury, And Saint Thomas A Becket, Archbishop Of Canterbury. The Time And Place ...

Cutlery
Cutlery. Cutlery Broadly Considered May Include Any Article With A Cutting Edge. From A Trade And Makers Definition, It Com Prises Only Pocket Knives, Table Knives, Razors And Scissors. These Are Four Distinct And Separate Trades, And Although All Four Are Often Carried 'on By One Firm, Many Manufacturers Confine ...

Cuttage
Cuttage, The Propagation Of Plants By Means Of Slips Or Cuttings Which Are Detached Parts Of Roots, Stems, Leaves, Etc. This Form Of Asexual Or Bud-propagation Is Found In Na Ture Among Willows, Poplars And Many Other Trees And Shrubs, Especially Such As Are Readily Broken By Wind And Drop ...

Cuttlefish
Cuttlefish, A Common Name For The Cephalopods, But Originally Applied To A Member Of The Genus Sepia. In The United States It Is Restricted To The Octopods (q.v.). The Cuttle Fish Proper, S. Officinalis, Measures From 6 To 10 Inches In Length, And Its Color Varies From Pale-gray To Dark-brown ...

Cuttyhunk
Cuttyhunk, Mass., The Most Southerly Island In Buzzard's Bay. It Was On This Island That Bartholomew Gosnold Landed, On 25 May 1602, And There Established The First Settle Ment Of White Men In That Part Of The World. He Named The Island After Queen Elizabeth, Calling It Elizabeth Isle. The ...

Cuyp
Cuyp, The Name Of A Family Of Dutch Artists: (1) Jacob Giatarrsz, Dutch Painter, Commonly Called The Old Cuyp ; B. Dordrecht 1575; D. 1651. Jacob Cuyp's Representation Of Cows And Sheep, Battles And Encampments, Are Clever, But His Fame Rests Principally On His Ex Cellent Portraits Which Can He ...

Cuzco
Cuzco, Peru, The Most Famous Ancient City Of South America. Situated In Lat. 31' S. And Ion. 73° 3' W., Cuzco Is At An Elevation Of 11,380 Feet Above The Sea (compare Mount Washington, 6,288 Feet, And Mont Blanc, 15,779 Feet), And Its Climate Is Temperate; But In Winter Snow ...

Cy Pres
Cy-pres, Sepia (old Norman French For Gas Near As Possible)), The Principle In The Anierican And English Law Whereby A Gift Legal In Form, Which Cannot Be Administered Exactly As The Testator Specified, Or Which Is Not Defi Nitely Specified, May Be Applied )as Nearly As Possible,* According To The ...

Cyanide Practice
Cyanide Practice, A Term Used To Cover Generally The Diverse Applications Of The Process Of Securing The Precious Metals From Their Ores Through The Use Of Potassium Cyanide. While The Process Follows Certain Basic Lines, The Applications Of It Vary Almost With Every Mine In Which It Has Been Put ...

Cybele
Cybele, Sib'6-1e, A Goddess Of Asia Minor, Like Isis, The Symbol Of The Moon, And What Is Nearly Connected With This, Of The Fruitfulness Of The Earth, For Which Reason She Is Con Founded With Rhea, Whose Worship Originated In Crete, And In Whom Personified Nature Was Revered. According To ...

Cycadales
Cycadales, Slic-a-clalez (from Cytas Neo Lat. Nom. P1. Of Gr. Ainats; The Orig Inal Name Of The African Cocoa-palm), A Greater Group Of Tropic To Sub-tropic Naked-seeded Or Gymnospermous Plants, The Cycads. The Large Pith Of The Thick Palm-like Trunk Of Certain Species Of The Genus Cycas Is The Source ...

Cycadophyta
Cycadophyta, A Term Of Convenience For All Cycad-leafed Plants, Introduced By A. G. Nathorst. The Great Majority Of Such Plants Are Extinct And Of Unknown Fructification, But So Far As Discovered They Are Naked Seeded Or Gymno Spermous. The Apposed Gymnosperm Group Coniferophyta Is Now Also Used For The Living ...

Cyclone
Cyclone (gr. Uwhirling,p A Term Originally Applied To The Violent Rotatory Tempests Of The Tropical And Sub-tropical Regions, Called In The West Indies Hurricanes; In Senegal, Tornadoes; At The Cape Of Good Hope, Trovados; In The Chinese Sea, Typhoons; And On The West Coast Of Central America, Papagallos. The Diameter ...

Cyclostomi
Cyclostomi, Si-klos'to-me (gr. Around Mouthed"), One Of The Five Primary Divisions Or Classes Of The Craniate Vertebrate, Also Called Agnatka, Marsipobranckii, Etc. Excluding The Doubtful Extinct Ostracoderms, The Cyclostomes Have An Imperfect, Embryonic Brain Case, No Lower, Jaw, No Paired Limbs Or Their Supporting Girdles, No Ribs And No Scales. ...

Cymbeline
Cymbeline. Tragedy Of Cym Beline' Is The Last Play In The Shakespeare Folio Of 1623. Its Classification There Among The Tragedies Is Surprising, Since The Editors Of The Folio Made No Other Such Positive Error Of Defi Nition. One Would Expect To Find This Play In The List Of Comedies ...

Cynics
Cynics, A School Ofphilosophers Founded By A Pupil Of Socrates, At Athens About 380 B.c. Opinions Differ As To The Origin Of The Name. It Is Possible That It May Have Been Derived From The Gymnasium Called Cyno Sarges (q.v.), Where Aristippus First Delivered His Lectures; Or From The Greek ...

Cypress
Cypress, The Popular Name For Members Of The Genus Cupressus And For Certain Specks Of The Related Genera, Taxodium And Chamee Cyparis. There Are About A Dozen Species Of Cupressus, Which Are Trees Or Sometimes Shrubs With Small Aromatic, Evergreen Opposite Leaves And Tiny Moncecious Solitary Flowers, The Pistil Late ...

Cyprian
Cyprian, Sfp'ff-an, Saint (thaains Cadcilius Cyprianus), African Bishop, Martyr And One Of The Fathers Of The Church: B. About 200; D. Carthage, 14 Sept. 258. He Was Of Patrician Parentage And Inherited A Considerable Estate. Having Received The Highest Education He Professed Rhetoric With Eminent Success In Carthage And In ...

Cyprus
Cyprus, An Island Under British Protec Torate, Lying South Of Asia Minor, And The Most Eastern In The Mediterranean, Near The Mouth Of The Bay Or Gulf Of Iskanderun. It Is The Third Largest Island In The Mediterranean, And, Stretch Lug From Southwest To Northeast, Is About 148 Miles Long, ...

Cyrano De Bergerac
Cyrano De Bergerac, Se-rrn6 Cic Barzh'rak, By Edmond Rostand, Was First Acted In Paris 28 Dec. 1897. The Hero, Always The Cen Tral Figure And Usually The Speaker, Was A Man Of Mark In His Day (1620-55) As A Gasconnading Soldier, Intrepid And Indefatigable Duellist, A Facile Poet, Talented Musician ...

Cyrenaica
Cyrenaica, Sir-e-nri-ka, Anciently A Greek. State In The North Of Africa, Between Marmarica On The East And The Regio Syrtica On The West, And Extending In Its Widest Limits From The Philenonun Are At The Bottom Of The Great Syrties To The Chersonesus Magna Or North Headland Of The Gulf ...

Cyril
Cyril, Gel!, Saint, Patriarch Of Alex Andria, And One Of The Fathers Of The Church: B. Alexandria 376; D. There, June 444. He Was Educated In The Desert 65 Miles South Of Alex Andria By The Cenobitic Monks Of Nitria. He Was Patriarch Of Alexandria From 412, When He •succeeded ...

Cyril Of Jerusalem
Cyril Of Jerusalem, Saint, Greek Father Of The Church: B. Jerusalem About 315; D. There, 18 March 386. After His Ordination To The Priesthood In 345 His Special Office Was To Instruct The Catechumens, Both Those Who Were To Be Prepared For Admission To The Christian Communion Through Baptism And ...

Cyrillic Alphabet
.."'cyrillic Alphabet, The Story Of Whose Invention By Cyril (820-69), Apostle To The Slays, Whether True Or False, Forms An In Teresting Episode In Ecclesiastical Annals, Is Still A Debatable Form Of Letters As To Its Precise Origin And History. Its Reputed Inventor Was Originally A Monk Called Constantine, Who ...

Cyrillus
Cyrillus And Methodius, Apostles Of The Slays. They Were Brothers And Natives Of Thessalonica. Cyril Was The Name Adopted As A Monk By Constantine, B. 827. For His Learning He Was Surnamed .(the Philosopher.* The Khasars, A Tartar People, Having About The Year 860 Asked The Emperor Michael Iii To ...

Cyrus The Great
Cyrus The Great, King Of Persia: B. About 600; D. 529 A.c. The Ancient Original Authorities For The Facts Of His Life Are Herodo Tus And Ctesias, But Their Accounts Are Inter Spersed With Many Highly Colored Legends. His Lineage We Have From A Famous Cuneiform Cylinder Prepared Under His ...

Cyrus The Younger
Cyrus The Younger, King Of Per Sia: B. About 424 A.c.; D. 401 B.c. He Was The Second Son Of Darius Nothus, Or Ochus, And At 15 Obtained The Supreme Power Over All The Provinces Of Asia Minor. His Ambition Early Displayed Itself ; And When, After His Father's Death ...

Cytology
Cytology, The Science Which Deals With The Structure, Development And Functions Of The Cell; Of The Multiplication Of Cells And Of The Relations Of Cells To Organs And Tissues. It Is Distinguished From Histology In That Histology Deals With Tissues, While Cytology Deals Rather With The Cells Of Which Tissues ...

Czartoryski
Czartoryski, Adam George, Prince, Polish Statesman And Patriot: B. Warsaw, 14 Jan. 1770• D. Paris, 16 July 1861.he Was The Son Of Prince Adam C.asimir Czartoryski, The Head Of An• Ancient Polish House. His Education Was Completed At The University Of Edinburgh And In London. After The Partition Of His ...

Czech Literature
Czech Literature. The Tested Earliest Document In The Czech Language Dates From The Year 973 A.d. It Was A Hymn Sung At The Installation Of Bishop Dietmar At Prague, Beginning With The Phrase: Ny) (lord, Have Mercy On Us). When Czech Literature Had Its Resurrection, About The Year 1800, And ...

Czechs
Czechs And An Ethnic Group Of The Great Slavonic Family Of Races. Of The Former, About 7,000,000 Inhabit Bohemia, Moravia And Austrian Silesia, While About 3,000,000 Slovaks Live Under Hungarian Rule. The Approximate Total Of 10,000,000 Czechs And Czecho-slovaks Must Be Accepted With Some Reserve. The Last Official Census, 1910, ...

Czernin
Czernin, Cherinin, Count Ottokar Von Und Zu Chudenitz And Morzin, Garian Statesman: B. Dimokar, Bohemia, 27 Aug. 1875. For Six Years Preceding The Out Break Of The European War He Served As Austro-hungarian Minister To Rumania. On His Appointment To That Diplomatic Post The Hungarian Press Raised A Chorus Of ...

Czuczor
Czuczor, Tsoo'tsor, Gergely, Hungarian .poet And Philologist: B. And6d, 17 Dec. 1800; D. Pest, 9 Sept. 1866. He Was A Benedictine Monk, And The Eroticism Of The First Collection Of His 'poetical Works' (1836) Brought On Him Stern Animadversion From His Superiors. From 1825 To 1835, He Was Professor In ...

Dabaiba
Dabaiba (also Written Dabaybe, D'abaibe, Etc.), A Region Lying South Of The Gulf Of Darien, Of Which The Boundaries Were Never Eiractly Defined. Spanish Adventurers In The 16th Century Learned, As A Matter Of Common Report, That They Might Find Or At Least By Exploring In That General Direction, A ...

Dacia
Dacia, A Hamburg-amerika Liner Origi Nally Employed In The Cotton Trade Between Gal Veston And Hamburg. Just Before The Outbreak Of The European War She Entered Port Arthur, Tex., And Remained In Obscurity There Until, At The End Of The Year (1914), The Announcement Was Made That She Had Been ...

Daggers
Daggers, Short-bladed Weapons For Stabbing. There Are Still Extant Flint Daggers Not Less Than 5,000 Years Old. Homer Makes Mention Of The Dagger. Primitive Nations Use Daggers Made Of Wood, Bone,- Animals' Sharp Horns, Etc. The Citlrellus; Or Coustel, Of The 11th Century Was Used By Saxon And Norman Foot ...

Dagnan Bouveret
Dagnan-bouveret, Dfin-yin Boov-ra; Pascal Adolphe Jean, French Painter: B. Paris, 7 Jan. 1852. He Was A Pupil Of Gerome, And Recipient In 1874 Of The Second (grand Prize Of Rome' He Soon Broke With The Style Of Gerome And Showed The Influence Of Bastien Lepage. His Picture Of The Death ...

Daguerreotype Process
Daguerreotype Process. This Is One :of• The Tiarliest Methods Knovin For Fixing The. Image, Afforded By 'the Camera, And Thus Producing Permanent Pictures, Or "photographs" As Practised By Daguerre (q.v.), The Method Consisted In Exposing A Silver Plate To The Action Of Iodine Vapor Until A Suf Ficient Coating Of ...

Dahlia
Dahlia, A Genus Of Perennial Herbs Of The Family Asterace,r, Closely Related To The Genera Bidens, Coreopsis And Cosmos (q.v.), Which Are Distinguished By Technical Characters. In Deed, Cosmos Diversifolius, Or Black Cosmos, Is Well Known To American Gardeners As Bidens And Dahlia. The True Dahlias Are Much Con Fused ...

Dahlmann
Dahlmann, Carman, Friedrich Chris Toph, German Historian: B. Wismar, 13 May 1785; D. Bonn, Prussia, 5 Dec. 1860. He Studied At Copenhagen And Halle; In 1812 Was Appointed Professor Extraordinary Of History At Kiel, And In 1829 Accepted A Call To Fill The Chair Of Politi Cal Science In The ...

Dahomey
Dahomey, Da-hoinil Or (native Name Of The People, Dauma Or Dahoon1), West Africa, Formerly A Negro Kingdom, Now One Of The Colonies Of French West Africa, Bounded On The East By The British Possessions Of Nigeria And Lagos, On The South By The Gulf Of Guinea, On The West By ...

Dairy Industry
Dairy Industry, American. Com Pared With Other Farming And Agricultural In Dustries In The United States, Dairying Is Of Considerable Import And Shows Great Develop Ment During The Last Two Or Three Decades; In Fact Each Decade Far Outstrips The Preceding In Every Line Of The Industry. According To Gov ...

Daisy Miller
Daisy Miller. To Know This Novel By Henry James In All Its Forms, From The Straight Forward First Telling Of The Story In The Cornhill Magazine In 1878 To Its Revision In The New York Edition Of 1909, Including The Preface To The Latter And The Reworking Of The Former ...

Dakota Wesleyan University
Dakota Wesleyan University. A Charter For An Institution To Be Known As Dakota University Was Obtained In 1883, As The Result Of A Resolution Of The Dakota Mission Conference Held At Parker The Year Before. This Resolution Had Provided For The Appoint Ment Of A Committee To Investigate Various Of ...

Dalberg
Dalberg, Darbirg, Karl Theodor, Baron Von, Prince And Archbishop Of Mayence, Chancellor Of The Empire, And Elector: B. 1744; D. Ratisbon, 10 Feb. 1817. Having Made His Academic Studies In The Universities Of G8ttin Gen And Heidelberg, He Devoted Himself To The Study Of Canon Law And Entered The Ecclesiasti ...

Dalcroze
Dalcroze, Dalicroz% Emile Jacques, Swiss Composer And Originator Of Eurythmics: B. Vienna, 6 July 1865. He Lived In Geneva From 1873 To 1910. While Pursuing The Study Of Lit Erature At The University Of Geneva, He Also Attended The Conservatory. Later He Studied With Fuchs, Graedener And Bruckner At The ...

Dalembert
D'alembert, Dalliebie, The Assumed Mum Of Jean Le 'rond French Mathematician And Philosopher: B. 1717; D. 1783. He Was The Natural Son Of Chevalier Destouches And Madame De Tencin. As An Infant He Was Left On The Portico Of The Chapel Of Saint Jean Le Rond. His Father Contributed Secretly ...

Dalhousie College And Uni
Dalhousie College And Uni Versity, An Institution Of Learning Located At Halifax, N. S. It Was Founded In 1818 By The Rt. Hon. George Ramsay (q.v.), 9th Earl Of Dalhousie, Whose Last Public Act In Nova Scotia Was The Laying Of The Cornerstone Of The Old Building, 22 May 1820, ...

Dallas
Dallas, Ga., Battle Lines At. After The Confederate Evacuation Of Dalton (see Dm:1.0n, Ga., Military Operations At), 12 May 1864, And The Battle Of Resaca, 14-15 May, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's Army Retreated By Way Of Calhoun And Adairsville To Cassville, Where General Johnston Prepared To Make A Stand, And ...

Dallas
Dallas, Tex., City, County-seat Dallas County, 270 Miles North Of The Gulf Of Mexico On The Trinity River, Navigable To That Point, And On Nine Steam And Five Electric Interurban Railroads. The Steam Railroads Are The Missouri, Kansas And Texas Railway; Missouri, Okla Homa And Gulf Railway; Houston, Texas Cen ...

Dalmatia
Dalmatia.. A Crownland Of Austria Hungary Forming Part Of The Kingdom Of Croatia-slavonia-dalmatia And Situated Along The Eastern Adriatic Coast. It Is Bounded To The North By Croatia, To The East By Bosnia Herzegovina, To The South By Montenegro. The Area Is 4,956 Square Miles. There Are About 500 Islets ...

Dalton
Dalton, Ga., Military Operations At (23-25 Feb. 1864, And 8-12 May 1864, Including Engagements At Buzzard's Roost Gap, Dug Gap, Rocky Face Ridge And Varnell Station). Dal Ton Is In The Northwestern Part Of Georgia, Where The Chattanooga And Atlanta Railroad Is Intersected By That From Cleveland, Tenn. By Rail ...

Damages
Damages, The Injury, Recoverable By A Person Who Has Sustained An Njury, Either In His Person, Property Or Relative Rights, Through The Act Or Default Of Another; Also, The Sum Claimed As Such • Indemnity By A Plaintiff In His Complaint. Compensatory Damages Are Damages Allowed As A Recompense For ...

Damascus
Damascus (native Name Sham, Syria), A Celebrated City, Capital Of The Turkish Vilayet Of Syria, Finely Situated On A Plain, At The Eastern Base Of The Anti-libanus Range And Supposed To Be The Most Ancient City In The World. It Is Six Miles In Circumference, And Is Surrounded By A ...

Damascus Blades
Damascus Blades, Swords Or Scimi Tars Anciently Made At Damascus, Syria. These Famous Weapons, Used Among Nations Little Skilled In The Metallurgic Arts, Long Before The Christian Era, And Made Familiar To European Nations From The Time Of The Crusades, Long Defied All Attempts At Imitation. It Appears That The ...

Damask
Damask, A Textile Fabric, The Ground Of Which Is Bright And Glossy, With Vines, Flowers Andres Interwoven. At First It Was Made Only Silk, But Afterward Of Linen And Woolen. According To The Opinion Of Some, This Kind Of Weaving Was Derived From The Babylonians; Ac Cording To Others, Invented ...

Damasus
Damasus, The Name Of Two Popes. 1. Saner Damasus I Was Of The Hispanic Race: B. Rome, About 304; D. 384. From An Early Age He Was Employed As An Inferior Minister In The Service Of The Roman See. He Was Elected To The Papacy (366) ; But As His ...

Dambul
Dambul, Dim-boor, Dambool, Or Dambulla, A Village In The Island Of Ceylon, At The Junction Of Four Lines Of Road, 70 Miles Northeast Of Colombo. It Takes Its Name From The Rock Dambul, A Large Mass Of Gneiss And Mica Schist Which Rises 550 Feet Above The Sur Rounding Plain, ...

Damietta
Damietta, Egypt, Town In Lower Egypt, On One Of The Principal Branches Of The Nile, 125 Miles North-northeast Of Cairo; At. 31° 25' N.; Long. 31° 5' E. It Is Irregularly Built, And Contains Some Fine Mosques, Bazaars And Marble Baths. Damietta Was At One Time A Very Important Place, ...

Dammar
Dammar, A Resin Derived From Various Plants, Principally Agathis Danmiara And A. Australis, Both Members Of The Pine Family, Or The Trees Themselves. These Are Natives Of Molucca And The East India Islands, Also Of The Philippines And New Zealand. Danunar Is Exuded From The Main Stems And Also From ...

Dampier
Dampier, William, English Navigator: B. East Coker Somerset, June 1652; D. Lon Don, March 1715. In 1673 He Served In The Dutch War And Subsequently Engaged In A Band Of Privateers, As They Called Themselves, Although In Reality Pirates, With Whom He Roved On The Peruvian Coasts. Dampier, Wishing To ...

Damping Off
Damping-off, The Rotting Of 'seedlings And Cuttings. In The Seed-bed And The Cutting Bench, Usually Just Above The Surface Of The Soil. The Immediate Cause Is A Soil Fungus (usually Artotragus Or Pythium Debaryanum, Though Other Fungi May Produce The Same Effect) Which Feeds Upon Decaying Organic Matter Until It ...

Damrosch
Damrosch, Leopold, German Musician : B. Posen, Prussia, 22 Oct. 1832; D. New York, 15 Feb; 1885. He Was Graduated From The Univer Sity.of Berlin, And Began The Practice Of Medi Cine; But His Love For Music Predominated, And M 1864 He Gave Up His Medical Profession And Started On ...

Dams To
Dams To Dam (originally, To Stop Up). It To 0,stfuct Or Restrain The Flow Of A Liquid., In Engineering, A Slaq, Is A, Barrier To Constrain. Ox Keep Back A Body Of Water.: Dams Vary In Struciure As Widely As The Physical Character Of: Their, Sites, Thepurposes For Which' They ...

Dana
Dana, James Dwight,- American 'mineral Ogist: B. Utica, N. Y., 12 Feb. 1813; D. New Haven, Conn., 14 April 1895; .he 'showed An Interest In Science From His Early Youth, And,this Was Encouraged By Fay Edgerton, His Teacher In Utica High School. In 1830 He • Matricu Lated At Yale, ...

Dana_2
Dana Marvin, American ,-writer-; B. Cornwall; Ivt., 2 'march 1867. • His 'published . Works'. Include .'''hater Christi And '-':either •, Of General.-custer"; His Tory Of ,the Mormons); T' Wars Of The Centuryl; Studies- In. Grinlinialogy>1; Brievuniversal Oz Diana; Atithild4lairierittitilltit4uti; 111 Cahill Brktgd,itias4., .7 ' 17 May' 1772: !;;he: Was ...

Danbury
Danbury, Conn., City In Fairfield County In The Southwestern Part Of The State. This Is One Of Two County-seats. It Has Railroads To New York, New Haven, Bridgeport, Hartford, Pittsfield, Poughkeepsie And Litchfield. These Are All Branches Of The New York, New Haven And Hartford Road. A Right Of Way ...